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Showing posts from March, 2018

Cash Rents and the 2019 Growing Season

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Cash Rents and the 2019 Growing Season
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Professional farm managers in the state of Illinois have completed a cash rent survey. Todd Gleason reports it is a fairly go indicator of where cash rents in the state can be expected to go. He talked with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey about the results.

Dry Cows | 10 Steps for a Successful Transition Period

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Dry Cows | 10 Steps for a Successful Transition Period | Playlist
Phil Cardoso, Dairy Specialist - University of IllinoisNutrition and management of the dry dairy cow has been an area of extensive research over the last 25 years. Although nutritional requirements during this phase are fairly simple, the sudden transition from non-lactating to lactating state – as well as the physiologic and metabolic processes associated with it – make the transition period a fascinating and important stage of the production cycle of the dairy cow.

Avoid Invasives, Plant Natives this Spring

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Avoid Invasives, Plant Natives this Spring
Kelly Allsup, Horticulture - University of Illinois Extension Invasive plant species in our natural areas can wreak havoc for wildlife. These invasive plants can reduce nesting sites or add confusion for birds causing them to nest too early, reduce insect and pollinator food and habitat and drastically reduce native plant populations. Todd Gleason talks with Illinois Extension’s Kelly Allsup about native alternatives to some popular landscape plants.

Designing & Planting a Windbreak

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Designing & Planting a Windbreak
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionRight now may be a very good time to consider creating a windbreak for your home or farm. Todd Gleason has more on how with Duane Friend from University of Illinois Extension.

Exceptional Corn and Soybean Yields in 2017

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Exceptional Corn and Soybean Yields in 2017
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleMany areas of the country had above trend yields in 2017. While still not the majority, county yields of over 200 bushels per acre are becoming common and may be expected in the center of the corn-belt. Similarly, counties with over 60 bushels per acre are occurring with some regularity. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey.

Export Outlook for Soybean

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Export Outlook for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleRecent data on the soybean export pace indicates stronger weekly sales. This offers hope for meeting the USDA marketing year export projection. The size of the 2018 crop in South America and the competitiveness of U.S. export prices, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs, remain essential to determining U.S. export possibilities for the remainder of the marketing year.
ILLINOIS Ag Economist Todd Hubbs discusses the potential for U.S. soybean exports to meet USDA’s stated marketing year goal with Todd Gleason.

Trends in Farm Balance Sheets Over Time

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Trends in Farm Balance Sheets Over Time
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleTrends in the financial position of Illinois farms are presented in this article.
University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey explored Illinois Farm Business Farm Management balance sheets to see how they have changed over time. He discusses those changes with University of Illinois Extension Farm Broadcaster Todd Gleason.Overall, farms gained financial strength from 2006 to 2012. Since 2012, working capital has declined. The net worth and debt-to-asset position of most farms remain strong, but per acre net worth has decreased and the debt-to-asset ratios have increased in recent years. Those are worrisome trends. Future financial performance depends on returns. Likely financial performance given differing commodity prices are presented at the end of this article.

Estimating the March 1 Grains Stocks Report

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Corn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report.

The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is the quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand.



The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector.

He says most of the other use categories can be tracked, but that Feed and Residual category is different, “There is really no good idea as we move through the marketing year what that is going to be and I look at historical data and what the USDA is saying the number is going to be. USDA is currently saying 5.55 billion bush…

Estimating the March 1 Grains Stocks Report

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Corn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report.

The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is the quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand.



The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector.

He says most of the other use categories can be tracked, but that Feed and Residual category is different, “There is really no good idea as we move through the marketing year what that is going to be and I look at historical data and what the USDA is saying the number is going to be. USDA is currently saying 5.55 billion bush…

Last Call for Soybean Information

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Last Call for Soybean Information
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist (retired) - University of Illinois

Farmers are always complaining university research, because it is done in small plot trials, doesn’t reflect real world conditions. Todd Gleason reports, now is the time for them to go all in on a best management practices study for soybeans.

Land Grant university agronomists across the whole…
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Land Grant university agronomists across the whole of the corn belt have been asking producers for their production data. Emerson Nafziger is in charge for the state of Illinois. He says it’s not been easy to convince farmers to fill out a production practices survey.

Nafziger :41 …$50 gift card if they’ll fill out one of these forms.

Quote Summary - As our part of it here in Illinois we are supposed to collect data from about 500 soybean fields a year for each of those crop years. We have not gotten really very close to that, yet, so we are …

USDA’s Next Big Report Day is March 29

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USDA’s Next Big Report Day is March 29
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisCorn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. Todd Gleason has this report….The agency has been surveying farmers…
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2:16 radio self-contained The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report. The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand. The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector. Hubbs :31 …1.68 billion bushels of disappearance for the second quarter. Quote Summary - Most of the other use cat…

Hunger Summit at ILLINOIS March 15-17

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PUSH (Presidents United to Solve Hunger) is a consortium of universities from around the world that have the collective mission to end hunger and poverty, both locally and globally. Ninety university presidents from five continents have agreed to make food and nutrition security a priority on their campus—making ending hunger a core value of higher education institutions worldwide.

March 15-17 participants will meet at the i-Hotel on the University of Illinois campus. There is a free and open to the public session from 4-6pm Thursday, March 15.

Details are available online at https://publish.illinois.edu/push-conference/

the following organizations are supporting PUSH

Explaining the Illinois Extension Master Naturalist Program

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Explaining the Illinois Extension Master Naturalist Program
Dave Shiley, University of Illinois ExtensionThe Master Naturalist program is for nature lovers. It is offered through University of Illinois Extension and gives people the opportunity to expand their knowledge while volunteering in the community.

The Early Birds | a Master Naturalist Journal Entry

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The Early Birds | a Master Naturalist Journal Entry
Rose Moore, University of Illinois Extension Master Naturalistby Rose Moore, Illinois Extension Certified Master NaturalistJust about this time every winter, subtle changes begin to occur in the natural world. There still may be snow on the ground and in the air but that doesn’t seem to affect the invisible clocks of the creatures around us.Every morning as winter gradually lessons it’s grip, these changes become more noticeable to me. On this late February day, I immediately heard the noisy chatter of blackbirds as I stepped outside. This is a distinctive change from previously quiet mornings. Sure enough down near the creek a large flock of blackbirds could be seen in the honey locusts. I spotted a few red-winged blackbirds a distance away. Their cackles are the harbinger of spring to me as much as the robin. This chatter is a comfort to me and reminds me of childhood days spent outside in the spring.Hundreds of Europe…