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Showing posts from 2018

AirScout Precision Agriculture Startup

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AirScout Precision Agriculture Startup
Brian Sutton, AirScout Founder & President - Champaign, Illinois A startup on the south end of the University of Illinois campus @UIResearchPark is using thermal imaging to help precision agriculture become prescription agriculture. Todd Gleason has more on how AirScout @AirScoutInc is helping farmers take advantage of their precision-guided equipment.

EPA Wheeler Senate Hearing

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EPA Wheeler Senate Hearing
Andrew Wheeler, Acting Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyThis morning, during a U.S. Senate hearing, Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler answered questions about ethanol, biofuels, the RFS, and small refinery waivers. He appears to be holding the same line Scott Pruitt took during his time at the helm of the agency with some notable differences. Wheeler told U.S. Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa…
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2:55 radio self-contained Wheeler told U.S. Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa that EPA is looking for ways to improve transparency as it is related to the issuance of small refinery waivers. It is the reallocation of the waived ethanol gallons which has raised the ire of farm country politicians… that’s because EPA has seen fit not to reallocate those gallons to larger refineries. Here’s a portion of the exchange between Senator Ernst and Acting Administrator Wheeler. Ernst & Wheeler :58 …but we are confined by the law. Ernst …

Trade Tariff Farmer Compensation Package

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Trade Tariff Farmer Compensation Package
Chief Economist Rob Johansson, USDA
USDA Assistant Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Brad KarmenUSDA has announced a $12 billion dollar plan to compensate farmers for damages done so far by the trade dispute with China and other nations. Todd Gleason has more on what is known about the plan.The largest part of that money will be paid out… 2:43 radio
2:56 radio self-contained The largest part of that money will be paid out to soybean producers, though direct payments will also be made for other commodities including corn, wheat, sorghum, cotton, dairy, and pork. USDA Chief Economist Rob Johansson told reporters on the line the initial damage calculation has already been made. Johansson :40 …the program will be flexible to allow that.Quote Summary - We’ve calculated what the damage is to producers facing these illegal tariff actions. We are working out the specific details and will be working it out as a rule making action in a…

Breeding Barley to Make Budweiser

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Breeding Barley to Make Budweiser
Josh Butler, Senior Manager Global Barley Breeding - Anheuser BuschYou might think of Anheuser Busch as a beverage company producing great American beers like Budweiser. However, as Todd Gleason reports from Idaho Falls, Idaho, it is a highly integrated agricultural company. AB InBev develops and tests its own barley varieties…
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1:32 tv self-containedAB InBev develops and tests its own barley varieties. Josh Butler is the senior manager for Global Barley Breeding. During this year’s Grower Days he explained to the farmers who raise barley for Anheuser Busch that his group has three main customers. There is the maltster, beer is made from malted barley; the brewer, the malt needs to be consistent in its enzyme and protein make up; and most importantly, he says, the farmer. Butler :07 …agronomics that are beneficial to a grower. Quote Summary: So, really, ultimately, the first goal is yield. Yield…

A Commodity Markets Interview with Todd Hubbs

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A Commodity Markets Interview with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe commodity markets seemed to have found a bottom for the moment. Todd Gleason has more on what may be next with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs.

Fungicides for Corn Yield Kick, Yeah No

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Fungicides for Corn Yield Kick, Yeah No
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisFarmers are always under pressure to spend more money to protect their crop from insect pests and diseases. Todd Gleason has one more thing they probably shouldn’t use. In the case of fungicides corn producers…
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1:17 radio self-contained In the case of fungicides corn producers will hear about the potential for yield increases. The odds are against that says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski (kleh-cheh-ski).Kleczewski :38 …save yourself the money. That’s kind of my thought. Quote Summary - It is not consistent. You are probably less than 30% of the time that you are going to see anything. And as I have mentioned in some of my talks and some my posts, your may reason to apply a fungicide should be to prevent disease and that is when you are going to see the most benefit. If you are applying it thinking that maybe 30% of…

When Farmers Should Spray for Japanese Beetles

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When Farmers Should Spray for Japanese Beetles
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of IllinoisJapanese beetles are showing up in corn and soybean fields. These can do enough damage to cause yield losses, but it is fairly unlikely. Todd Gleason has more…The University of Illinois has published thresholds…
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1:26 radio self-containedThe University of Illinois has published thresholds for when farmers should spray crops to protect them from the Japanese beetle. Nick Seiter says there needs to be a lot of beetles and a whole lot damage done before a producer should spend money on a rescue treatment. Seiter :41 …the field while pollination is still ongoing. Quote Summary - Most of the reports that I am getting, as you would expect and as is typical, are below the treatment thresholds. These are 25 percent defoliation after bloom and 35 percent before bloom for soybean and the threshold for silk clipping in corn is consistent clipping to half-an-inch or le…

EPA's Biofuels Proposal May Contradict Congressional Intent

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EPA’s Biofuels Proposal May Contradict Congressional Intent
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The biofuels proposal U.S. EPA put forth this week appears to give the agency authority Congress did not intend. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois. The proposed rulemaking asserts…
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2:22 tv cgThe proposed rulemaking asserts EPA’s right to extend small refinery waivers without reallocating the congressionally mandated gallons. In this case that would be corn-based ethanol blended into the nation’s regular gasoline supply at the rate of no more than 15 billion gallons annually says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin.Irwin :28 …not sure that they will be able to make that hold.Quote Summary - It seems like that could be challenged in court. It is easy to establish that this was the most important policy decision EPA had to make for this rulemaking and it said “no way, n…

McDonald's Uses 2% of the U.S. Beef Supply

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McDonald’s Uses 2% of the U.S. Beef Supply
Rickette Collins, Sr. Director Global Supply Chain - McDonald’s CorporationHave you seen those fresh beef quarter pounder commercials from McDonald’s? That campaign has been running since March. It is working, and as Todd Gleason reports some Illinois beef producers found out just how well at their association’s summer conference in Galena. 1:30 radio
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1:46 tv cgA senior supply director for McDonald’s made an hour-long presentation to those farmers. They raise some of the beef used at its restaurants. Rickette Collins told them the fresh beef campaign has been a big success. Collins :10 …68% increase in Quarter Pounder sales.Quote Summary - So, in the U.S. we’ve just launched our fresh quarter-pound beef patties and we’ve seen tremendous success with about a 68% increase in Quarter Pounder sales.That was the initial uptick, but the thing is the fresh beef push has been hanging on to a lot of those…

KILL 9am Jun 22 | Farm Bill Vote Friday

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KILL 9am Jun 22 | Farm Bill Vote Friday
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois The House of Representatives is set to vote Friday (today) on a version of the farm bill that failed earlier in the year. Todd Gleason has more from the Univeristy of Illinois on how the vote may go, what the bill contains, and how it compares to the Senate’s version of the legislation.

Nothing to do about Seedling Diseases in Soybean

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Nothing to do about Seedling Diseases in Soybean
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisSoybean seed treatments aren’t working at the moment and there’s nothing a farmer can do. Todd Gleason has more from east central Illinois.1:47 radio
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2:01 tv cgIf you drive around much you’ll have noted some drown out areas in soybean fields, probably across the whole of the corn belt. Those are pretty easy to spot, but there are some areas that look like they’ve not been underwater - at least not for very long, if at all. They’re wilted back and showing signs of seedling diseases says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski. Kleczewski :20 …are well past that point now. Quote Summary - Why am I seeing these diseases now? You must remember these soybeans have been in the ground for 30 or 40 days and seed treatments are going to only give us two to three weeks of protection. Under perfect cond…

Replacing Petrochemicals with Biochemicals made from Corn

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Replacing Petrochemicals with Biochemicals made from Corn
Vijah Singh, Agricultural Engineer - University of IllinoisFarmers gathered in St. Louis this week (June 4, 5, 6) to learn about future uses for the nation’s number one commodity crop. Todd Gleason has more from the Corn Utilization Technology Conference. CUTC happens every two years…
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2:02 tv cg CUTC happens every two years. It is a conference dedicated to future uses of corn. Vijay Singh is a regular. He works for the agricultural college at the University of Illinois and specializes in engineering ethanol processing plants. He sees them expanding to include biochemical production in the near future. Singh :23 …comes from the corn processing industry.Quote Summary - You know chemicals have been around, but they come from petroleum sources. Now what we are doing is rather than using petroleum sources is using renewable sources. That’s the big thing right now and for that we ne…

Corn Growth Stage and Post-Emergence Herbicides

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Corn Growth Stage and Post-Emergence Herbicides
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois The month of May was one of the warmest on record across the Midwest. That heat has the corn crop growing really fast. As Todd Gleason reports, this means farmers will be short on time to get post-emergence herbicide applications done. The labels of most post-emergence corn…
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1:38 tv cg The labels of most post-emergence corn herbicides allow applications at various crop growth stages, but almost all product labels also indicate a maximum growth stage beyond which broadcast applications should not be made says University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager. Hager :15 …twelve inch corn cutoff height.For product labels that indicate a specific corn height and growth state, Hager says farmers should be sure to follow the more restrictive of the two. Hager :18 …go with the development stage instead of the corn height.The …

Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials

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Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of Illinois When farmers want to know how well an insecticide works they turn to their Land Grant University for unbiased information. Todd Gleason has more from the western corn rootworm trials on the Urbana-Champaign campus. This little four row planter is outfitted…
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2:00 tv cgThis little four-row planter is outfitted with some pretty high tech stuff. All of which must be calibrated before it goes to the field where it will be used to plant a western corn rootworm trial. A trial that will assess how well twelve different current in-furrow liquid and granular insecticides work. Well, at least some of them are current products, others are experimentals says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter. Seiter :25 …how effective they are.Quote Summary - We like to evaluate all the different options that are out there. There is alw…

How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans

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How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe President has been tweeting about agriculture. He says the potential deal with China will result in “massive” export increases for farm commodities. Most have taken this to mean, at a minimum, that the flow of soybeans will be increased. University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs has been pondering the implications and the deal. Hubbs 4:04 …but a large increase is going to put a lot of pressure on prices. Todd Hubbs specializes is row crop commodity marketing at the University of Illinois. You may read his thoughts on marketing soybeans in today’s (this week’s) post to the farmdocDaily website.

Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans

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Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Farmers, as we enter the last half of May, are nearing the end of the spring planting season and they are turning their attention again to the marketplace. Todd Gleason has more on how one agricultural economist sees prices playing out for the year. We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes…
2:47 radio 3:04 radio self-contained We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes in the Supply and Demand tables for each commodity, the season’s average price. For corn, that number - at the midpoint - is $3.80. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is a bit more optimistic. He has it at $4.05. His soybean price, however, is less than USDA’s. The agency has it at $10.00 a bushel. Hubbs puts it at $9.45. The difference in viewpoint says Hubbs lands squarely on soybean exports.Hubbs :36 …whats going on currently in the market.Quote Summary - When we look forwa…

Projected Cutting Dates for Black Cutworm in Corn

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Projected Cutting Dates for Black Cut Worm in Corn
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of IllinoisFarmers should be on the look out for black cut worm in their corn fields. Todd Gleason has more…1:34 radio
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0:44 tv voicerThe earliest projected cutting date is this week in Montgomery County. University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter says fields especially at risk to having plants cut by the black cut worm include those with later planted corn and those sown into grassy weeds or a late terminated cover crop. Seiter :44 …to initiate a treatment. Quote Summary - What you are going to want to do is to scout your field. Look for plants lying on the ground that appear to have been cut with scissors. This is different looking than damage from a bird digging up the plant looking for the seed. These corn plants will be cut off. When you start finding that, scrape around in the residue looking for the larvae. The black cut worm l…

May 10 | USDA WASDE ReAct with Todd Hubbs

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May 10 | USDA WASDE ReAct with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The monthly WASDE report for May 2018 introduced the first look at the new crop corn and soybean supply & demand tables. Todd Gleason has more with University of Illinois commodity markets specialist Todd Hubbs.

Soybean Crush Continues Strength

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Soybean Crush Continues Strength
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisby Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleSoybean crush levels picked up substantially over the last few months due to strong crush margins. Driven by production issues in Argentina, the increase in crush margin recently is attributed to rapid growth in soybean meal prices. For the 2017–08 marketing year, the USDA currently projects the domestic crush at 1.97 billion bushels, up 3.6 percent from last marketing year. Soybean meal use needs to build on recent progress to meet or exceed the current crush projection.Soybean crush during the first half of the marketing year from September 2017 through February 2018 equaled 1010.6 million bushels, 3.5 percent greater than the total of the previous year. The USDA’s current projection indicates a 3.6 percent increase for the year and implies that the crush during the last half of the year will b…

Soil-borne Plant Disease Trials @ Illinois

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Soil-borne Plant Disease Trials @ Illinois
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisOver the next few years, companies will release new and updated ways to use seed treatments to control soil-borne diseases in corn and soybeans. Todd Gleason reports researchers at the University of Illinois are looking to assess how well each of these might work. One of the first steps in the scientific…
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1:17 tv cgOne of the first steps in the scientific process is to lay out the trials. In this case that means intentionally inoculating the area with a disease says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski (kleh-cheh-skee).Kleczewski :13 …getting those in the ground.Quote Summary - We are putting in some different soybean and corn trials today looking at different seed treatments for controlling seed-borne diseases. So, we have some pythium trials, some SDS trials, and some rhizoctonia tr…

ILLINOIS Plant Pathology Plots | an interview with Nathan Kleczewski

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ILLINOIS Plant Pathology Plots | an interview with Nathan Kleczewski
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of Illinois Farm Broadcaster Todd Gleason talks with the University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist about his research work on the south-farms.

Yield Implications of Delayed Corn Planting

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Yield Implications of Delayed Corn Planting
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleThe late spring has many worried. Others are confident farmers can plant a corn crop in 5 working days. Todd Gleason reports, University of Illinois agricultural economists have gone through the USDA data to see if this is true and what impact a late planting season might have on corn yields. 1:35 radio
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2:00 tv cg (TV ONLY) The grand prairie of Illinois is still lying dormant. It’s soils are just beginning to reach that magical 50 degree mark. That’s when the corn planters begin to roll. (RADIO START HERE) It’s a late start to the season this year, and despite the increased size of the machinery University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin says it’ll still take about as much time to plant the corn crop this season as it did nearly 30 years ago. Irwin :15 …to get the job done.Quote Summary - If we ar…

A Late Planting Season Lesson

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A Late Planting Season Lesson
Mike Tannura, T-storm Weather - Chicago, IllinoisThe late start to the growing season in the corn belt and the northern plains has farmers and traders worried. But, as a commodity marketing class at the University of Illinois found out this/last week (April 18) there is much more to be learned from the data. Todd Gleason has more…This 400 level agricultural college class taught…
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1:58 tv cg This 400 level agricultural college class taught by Scott Irwin includes guest lectures by Illinois alum involved in price discovery. In this case, Mike Tannura from T-storm Weather in Chicago is teaching them about how the weather and the markets work together. Right now he tells them is a good example of a weather market. The cold, the snow storms, the damp air hasn’t allowed farmers from Ohio to North Dakota to really begin the planting season.Tannura :15 …then everybody is going to fall behind.Quote Summary -…

Planting Dates and Acreage Switches in North Dakota

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Planting Dates and Acreage Switches in North Dakota
Hans Kandel, Broadleaf Crops Specialist - North Dakota State University The ground is still frozen in North Dakota and that means farmers have yet to turn a wheel for the planting season. The trade has been wondering what it might mean for the eventual acreage mix as it relates to spring wheat and soybeans. Todd Gleason explores the issue with NDSU Extension.

2018 Acreage Decisions: Steady as She Goes in Rough Waters

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2018 Acreage Decisions: Steady as She Goes in Rough Waters
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleThe price of corn and soybeans has been swinging on trade threats and changing acreage mixes in the United States. However, those price movements have yet to change the relative profitability between corn and soybeans writes Gary Schnitkey on the farmdocDaily website this week. Soybeans remain more profitable than corn in the University of Illinois agricultural economist’s crop budgets, but the difference between them has narrowed. Schnitkey says the risks of significant price declines have increased, particularly for soybeans and that hedging a large percentage of 2018 expected soybean production seems prudent.Current prices are higher than earlier in the winter. The central Illinois fall delivery bids on April 6, 2018 were $3.80 for corn and $10.00 per bushel for soybeans. Budgets based on these fall delivery bids are shown i…

NDSU’s Frayne Olson Talks Markets & the PNW

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NDSU’s Frayne Olson Talks Markets & the PNW
Frayne Olson, Agricultural Economist - North Dakota State UniveristyThe trading floor at North Dakota State University is extraordinary. Extension uses it to teach day trading lessons to farmers who need to take a longer outlook on the market place. Todd Gleason has more from the Fargo campus.

Spring Wheat, A Late Start, & Soybeans

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Spring Wheat, A Late Start, & Soybeans
Joel Ransom, Extension Cereal Grains Specialist - North Dakota State UniversityThe trade is already wondering what will come next if spring wheat doesn’t get planted across the northwestern corn belt. Todd Gleason traveled to Fargo to find out.

No Good Way for Perdue to Protect Farmers

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No Good Way for Perdue to Protect Farmers
Jonathan Coppess, Ag Policy Specialist - University of Illinois President Trump has asked the Secretary of Agriculture to protect U.S. farmers from the trade dispute with China. However, as Todd Gleason reports, there aren’t many options for Sonny Perdue.Last week Sonny Perdue was on the road for his second RV… 1:24 radio
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1:39 tv cg Last week Sonny Perdue was on the road for his second RV tour of farm country. His first tour was last summer. That’s when he told producers he would be their salesman to the world. Now he’s being asked to be their protector in the face of trade restrictions, some in place others proposed, as President Trump sets about rectifying what he sees as unfair trade with China. However, Perdue isn’t saying what he’ll do for farmers and there may be a good reason that’s the case says University of Illinois Ag Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess. Coppess :40 …that limits the crea…

Illinois 4-H'ers Package 1,000,000 Meals for the Hungry

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Illinois 4-H’ers Package 1,000,000 Meals for the Hungry
Bill Million, Extension Youth Development - University of Illinois

Wednesday night 4-H’ers in Illinois packaged their one-millionth meal to help feed the hungry. Todd Gleason was there and has the story.

The weather was cold for the beginning of April…
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The weather was cold for the beginning of April, but the hearts were all warm. 4-H members and volunteers gathered in a shed to create and package up meals. It’s something they’ve been doing under the guidance of Illinois Extension’s Bill Million since 2013.

Million :20 That time was the same year we launched the 4-H Feeding & Growing Our Communities Initiative here in Illinois. Meal packaging has been one of the integral components of engaging 4-H members, 4-H clubs, and communities that address hunger and food insecurity here in Illinois.

That’s no small accomplishment. Feeding America puts the number of …

Jonathan Coppess Breaks Down Trump Trade Issues

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Jonathan Coppess Breaks Down Trump Trade Issues
Jonathan Coppess, Ag Policy Specialist - Univeristy of Illinois The first week of April has been tumultuous for American agriculture. Todd Gleason talks with Jonathan Coppess about how the Trump Administration has been handling trade with China, the NAFTA negotiations, and biofuels.

How to Properly Use Dicamba on Soybeans

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How to Properly Use Dicamba on Soybeans
Aaron Hager, University of Illinois

read farmdocdaily article

As the growing season approaches it is important for farmers to understand how to use dicamba on resistant soybean varieties. Todd Gleason has more with University of Illinois weed scientist Aaron Hager.



The following is an excerpt from the March 23 farmdocdaily article posted by University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager.

Steps for Successful Weed Management in Dicamba-Resistant Soybean

Step 1
plant dicamba soybean seed into a weed-free seedbedachieve a weed-free seedbed through the use of preplant tillage, an effective burndown herbicide(s), or a combination of tillage and burndown herbicides Step 2:
select and apply within 7 days of planting a soil-residual herbicide that targets your most problematic weed species; if desired (and labeled), add dicamba and an appropriate bufferfor waterhemp or Palmer amaranth, select a product containing the active ingredients from…

A New Firmer Tone for Corn Prices

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A New Firmer Tone for Corn Prices
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Last week’s USDA reports solidified the more positive outlook the trade has had for corn. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois with commodity markets specialist Todd Hubbs.

Cash Rents and the 2019 Growing Season

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Cash Rents and the 2019 Growing Season
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Professional farm managers in the state of Illinois have completed a cash rent survey. Todd Gleason reports it is a fairly go indicator of where cash rents in the state can be expected to go. He talked with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey about the results.

Dry Cows | 10 Steps for a Successful Transition Period

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Dry Cows | 10 Steps for a Successful Transition Period | Playlist
Phil Cardoso, Dairy Specialist - University of IllinoisNutrition and management of the dry dairy cow has been an area of extensive research over the last 25 years. Although nutritional requirements during this phase are fairly simple, the sudden transition from non-lactating to lactating state – as well as the physiologic and metabolic processes associated with it – make the transition period a fascinating and important stage of the production cycle of the dairy cow.

Avoid Invasives, Plant Natives this Spring

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Avoid Invasives, Plant Natives this Spring
Kelly Allsup, Horticulture - University of Illinois Extension Invasive plant species in our natural areas can wreak havoc for wildlife. These invasive plants can reduce nesting sites or add confusion for birds causing them to nest too early, reduce insect and pollinator food and habitat and drastically reduce native plant populations. Todd Gleason talks with Illinois Extension’s Kelly Allsup about native alternatives to some popular landscape plants.

Designing & Planting a Windbreak

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Designing & Planting a Windbreak
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionRight now may be a very good time to consider creating a windbreak for your home or farm. Todd Gleason has more on how with Duane Friend from University of Illinois Extension.

Exceptional Corn and Soybean Yields in 2017

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Exceptional Corn and Soybean Yields in 2017
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleMany areas of the country had above trend yields in 2017. While still not the majority, county yields of over 200 bushels per acre are becoming common and may be expected in the center of the corn-belt. Similarly, counties with over 60 bushels per acre are occurring with some regularity. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey.

Export Outlook for Soybean

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Export Outlook for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleRecent data on the soybean export pace indicates stronger weekly sales. This offers hope for meeting the USDA marketing year export projection. The size of the 2018 crop in South America and the competitiveness of U.S. export prices, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs, remain essential to determining U.S. export possibilities for the remainder of the marketing year.
ILLINOIS Ag Economist Todd Hubbs discusses the potential for U.S. soybean exports to meet USDA’s stated marketing year goal with Todd Gleason.

Trends in Farm Balance Sheets Over Time

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Trends in Farm Balance Sheets Over Time
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleTrends in the financial position of Illinois farms are presented in this article.
University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey explored Illinois Farm Business Farm Management balance sheets to see how they have changed over time. He discusses those changes with University of Illinois Extension Farm Broadcaster Todd Gleason.Overall, farms gained financial strength from 2006 to 2012. Since 2012, working capital has declined. The net worth and debt-to-asset position of most farms remain strong, but per acre net worth has decreased and the debt-to-asset ratios have increased in recent years. Those are worrisome trends. Future financial performance depends on returns. Likely financial performance given differing commodity prices are presented at the end of this article.

Estimating the March 1 Grains Stocks Report

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Corn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report.

The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is the quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand.



The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector.

He says most of the other use categories can be tracked, but that Feed and Residual category is different, “There is really no good idea as we move through the marketing year what that is going to be and I look at historical data and what the USDA is saying the number is going to be. USDA is currently saying 5.55 billion bush…

Estimating the March 1 Grains Stocks Report

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Corn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report.

The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is the quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand.



The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector.

He says most of the other use categories can be tracked, but that Feed and Residual category is different, “There is really no good idea as we move through the marketing year what that is going to be and I look at historical data and what the USDA is saying the number is going to be. USDA is currently saying 5.55 billion bush…

Last Call for Soybean Information

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Last Call for Soybean Information
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist (retired) - University of Illinois

Farmers are always complaining university research, because it is done in small plot trials, doesn’t reflect real world conditions. Todd Gleason reports, now is the time for them to go all in on a best management practices study for soybeans.

Land Grant university agronomists across the whole…
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Land Grant university agronomists across the whole of the corn belt have been asking producers for their production data. Emerson Nafziger is in charge for the state of Illinois. He says it’s not been easy to convince farmers to fill out a production practices survey.

Nafziger :41 …$50 gift card if they’ll fill out one of these forms.

Quote Summary - As our part of it here in Illinois we are supposed to collect data from about 500 soybean fields a year for each of those crop years. We have not gotten really very close to that, yet, so we are …

USDA’s Next Big Report Day is March 29

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USDA’s Next Big Report Day is March 29
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisCorn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. Todd Gleason has this report….The agency has been surveying farmers…
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2:16 radio self-contained The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report. The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand. The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector. Hubbs :31 …1.68 billion bushels of disappearance for the second quarter. Quote Summary - Most of the other use cat…

Hunger Summit at ILLINOIS March 15-17

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PUSH (Presidents United to Solve Hunger) is a consortium of universities from around the world that have the collective mission to end hunger and poverty, both locally and globally. Ninety university presidents from five continents have agreed to make food and nutrition security a priority on their campus—making ending hunger a core value of higher education institutions worldwide.

March 15-17 participants will meet at the i-Hotel on the University of Illinois campus. There is a free and open to the public session from 4-6pm Thursday, March 15.

Details are available online at https://publish.illinois.edu/push-conference/

the following organizations are supporting PUSH

Explaining the Illinois Extension Master Naturalist Program

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Explaining the Illinois Extension Master Naturalist Program
Dave Shiley, University of Illinois ExtensionThe Master Naturalist program is for nature lovers. It is offered through University of Illinois Extension and gives people the opportunity to expand their knowledge while volunteering in the community.

The Early Birds | a Master Naturalist Journal Entry

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The Early Birds | a Master Naturalist Journal Entry
Rose Moore, University of Illinois Extension Master Naturalistby Rose Moore, Illinois Extension Certified Master NaturalistJust about this time every winter, subtle changes begin to occur in the natural world. There still may be snow on the ground and in the air but that doesn’t seem to affect the invisible clocks of the creatures around us.Every morning as winter gradually lessons it’s grip, these changes become more noticeable to me. On this late February day, I immediately heard the noisy chatter of blackbirds as I stepped outside. This is a distinctive change from previously quiet mornings. Sure enough down near the creek a large flock of blackbirds could be seen in the honey locusts. I spotted a few red-winged blackbirds a distance away. Their cackles are the harbinger of spring to me as much as the robin. This chatter is a comfort to me and reminds me of childhood days spent outside in the spring.Hundreds of Europe…

Soil & Water Management Webinar for Certified Crop Advisors

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Soil & Water Management Webinar for Certified Crop Advisors
earn 4.5 hard to get Soil & Water Management CEU’s
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionCertified Crop Advisors in the state of Illinois looking for the hard to get Soil and Water Management credits should registered today for a University of Ilinois Extension Webinar. The soil and water management webinar will be held February 20 at locations around the state. Crop Advisors can earn 4.5 CEU’s, or Continuing Education Units, by attending. The cost is $45 and includes lunch and snack. The program runs from 9 to 2 Tuesday, February 20th. Check with your local Illinois Extension office for complete details.

Above Trend Yields or Higher Prices Needed to Break-Even in 2018

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Above Trend Yields or Higher Prices Needed to Break-Even in 2018
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleFarmers figuring crop budgets for this year will face an uncomfortable reality. In order to break-even on cash rented land, generally speaking, it will require above trend yields, higher prices, or some combination of the two. Todd Gleason has more…

Is It Time to Sell New Crop Soybeans

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Is It Time to Sell New Crop Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleSoybean prices rallied over the last week on increased uncertainty in South American soybean production and a weaker dollar. Soybean prices in the 2017–18 marketing year are following a very similar pattern to last marketing year and brings to the forefront the prospects of 2018 soybean sales. New crop cash bid prices for harvest in central Illinois recently ranged between $9.70 and $9.80. A prudent marketing plan for soybeans this year may possess some selling of new crop soybeans in this price rally says Todd Hubbs from the University of Illinois.

Can Corn Prices Get Above the Current Range

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Can Corn Prices Get Above the Current Range
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read the farmdocDaily articleMarch corn futures continue to trade between $3.48 and $3.60. This has been the case since the release of the November USDA supply and demand tables. It continues today despite the bearish information contained in USDA’s end of year reports released January 12. Todd Hubbs says corn prices continue to stay in relatively narrow range, and that pattern may remain for the next several weeks.
Listen to Todd Hubbs discussion of his farmdocDaily article with Univesity of Illinois Farm Broadcaster Todd GleasonThe University of Illinois grain markets specialist says the present outlook projects ample corn supplies in 2018. This will likely keep corn prices in the current range until information on spring planting is released. USDA’s Prospective Plantings report is due March 29th. Hubbs says a typical price pattern suggests a price rally in late spring …