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Showing posts from 2018

Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials

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Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of Illinois When farmers want to know how well an insecticide works they turn to their Land Grant University for unbiased information. Todd Gleason has more from the western corn rootworm trials on the Urbana-Champaign campus. This little four row planter is outfitted…
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2:00 tv cgThis little four-row planter is outfitted with some pretty high tech stuff. All of which must be calibrated before it goes to the field where it will be used to plant a western corn rootworm trial. A trial that will assess how well twelve different current in-furrow liquid and granular insecticides work. Well, at least some of them are current products, others are experimentals says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter. Seiter :25 …how effective they are.Quote Summary - We like to evaluate all the different options that are out there. There is alw…

How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans

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How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe President has been tweeting about agriculture. He says the potential deal with China will result in “massive” export increases for farm commodities. Most have taken this to mean, at a minimum, that the flow of soybeans will be increased. University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs has been pondering the implications and the deal. Hubbs 4:04 …but a large increase is going to put a lot of pressure on prices. Todd Hubbs specializes is row crop commodity marketing at the University of Illinois. You may read his thoughts on marketing soybeans in today’s (this week’s) post to the farmdocDaily website.

Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans

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Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Farmers, as we enter the last half of May, are nearing the end of the spring planting season and they are turning their attention again to the marketplace. Todd Gleason has more on how one agricultural economist sees prices playing out for the year. We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes…
2:47 radio 3:04 radio self-contained We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes in the Supply and Demand tables for each commodity, the season’s average price. For corn, that number - at the midpoint - is $3.80. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is a bit more optimistic. He has it at $4.05. His soybean price, however, is less than USDA’s. The agency has it at $10.00 a bushel. Hubbs puts it at $9.45. The difference in viewpoint says Hubbs lands squarely on soybean exports.Hubbs :36 …whats going on currently in the market.Quote Summary - When we look forwa…

Projected Cutting Dates for Black Cutworm in Corn

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Projected Cutting Dates for Black Cut Worm in Corn
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of IllinoisFarmers should be on the look out for black cut worm in their corn fields. Todd Gleason has more…1:34 radio
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0:44 tv voicerThe earliest projected cutting date is this week in Montgomery County. University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter says fields especially at risk to having plants cut by the black cut worm include those with later planted corn and those sown into grassy weeds or a late terminated cover crop. Seiter :44 …to initiate a treatment. Quote Summary - What you are going to want to do is to scout your field. Look for plants lying on the ground that appear to have been cut with scissors. This is different looking than damage from a bird digging up the plant looking for the seed. These corn plants will be cut off. When you start finding that, scrape around in the residue looking for the larvae. The black cut worm l…

May 10 | USDA WASDE ReAct with Todd Hubbs

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May 10 | USDA WASDE ReAct with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The monthly WASDE report for May 2018 introduced the first look at the new crop corn and soybean supply & demand tables. Todd Gleason has more with University of Illinois commodity markets specialist Todd Hubbs.

Soybean Crush Continues Strength

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Soybean Crush Continues Strength
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisby Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleSoybean crush levels picked up substantially over the last few months due to strong crush margins. Driven by production issues in Argentina, the increase in crush margin recently is attributed to rapid growth in soybean meal prices. For the 2017–08 marketing year, the USDA currently projects the domestic crush at 1.97 billion bushels, up 3.6 percent from last marketing year. Soybean meal use needs to build on recent progress to meet or exceed the current crush projection.Soybean crush during the first half of the marketing year from September 2017 through February 2018 equaled 1010.6 million bushels, 3.5 percent greater than the total of the previous year. The USDA’s current projection indicates a 3.6 percent increase for the year and implies that the crush during the last half of the year will b…

Soil-borne Plant Disease Trials @ Illinois

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Soil-borne Plant Disease Trials @ Illinois
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisOver the next few years, companies will release new and updated ways to use seed treatments to control soil-borne diseases in corn and soybeans. Todd Gleason reports researchers at the University of Illinois are looking to assess how well each of these might work. One of the first steps in the scientific…
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1:17 tv cgOne of the first steps in the scientific process is to lay out the trials. In this case that means intentionally inoculating the area with a disease says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski (kleh-cheh-skee).Kleczewski :13 …getting those in the ground.Quote Summary - We are putting in some different soybean and corn trials today looking at different seed treatments for controlling seed-borne diseases. So, we have some pythium trials, some SDS trials, and some rhizoctonia tr…

ILLINOIS Plant Pathology Plots | an interview with Nathan Kleczewski

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ILLINOIS Plant Pathology Plots | an interview with Nathan Kleczewski
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of Illinois Farm Broadcaster Todd Gleason talks with the University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist about his research work on the south-farms.

Yield Implications of Delayed Corn Planting

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Yield Implications of Delayed Corn Planting
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleThe late spring has many worried. Others are confident farmers can plant a corn crop in 5 working days. Todd Gleason reports, University of Illinois agricultural economists have gone through the USDA data to see if this is true and what impact a late planting season might have on corn yields. 1:35 radio
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2:00 tv cg (TV ONLY) The grand prairie of Illinois is still lying dormant. It’s soils are just beginning to reach that magical 50 degree mark. That’s when the corn planters begin to roll. (RADIO START HERE) It’s a late start to the season this year, and despite the increased size of the machinery University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin says it’ll still take about as much time to plant the corn crop this season as it did nearly 30 years ago. Irwin :15 …to get the job done.Quote Summary - If we ar…

A Late Planting Season Lesson

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A Late Planting Season Lesson
Mike Tannura, T-storm Weather - Chicago, IllinoisThe late start to the growing season in the corn belt and the northern plains has farmers and traders worried. But, as a commodity marketing class at the University of Illinois found out this/last week (April 18) there is much more to be learned from the data. Todd Gleason has more…This 400 level agricultural college class taught…
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1:58 tv cg This 400 level agricultural college class taught by Scott Irwin includes guest lectures by Illinois alum involved in price discovery. In this case, Mike Tannura from T-storm Weather in Chicago is teaching them about how the weather and the markets work together. Right now he tells them is a good example of a weather market. The cold, the snow storms, the damp air hasn’t allowed farmers from Ohio to North Dakota to really begin the planting season.Tannura :15 …then everybody is going to fall behind.Quote Summary -…

Planting Dates and Acreage Switches in North Dakota

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Planting Dates and Acreage Switches in North Dakota
Hans Kandel, Broadleaf Crops Specialist - North Dakota State University The ground is still frozen in North Dakota and that means farmers have yet to turn a wheel for the planting season. The trade has been wondering what it might mean for the eventual acreage mix as it relates to spring wheat and soybeans. Todd Gleason explores the issue with NDSU Extension.

2018 Acreage Decisions: Steady as She Goes in Rough Waters

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2018 Acreage Decisions: Steady as She Goes in Rough Waters
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleThe price of corn and soybeans has been swinging on trade threats and changing acreage mixes in the United States. However, those price movements have yet to change the relative profitability between corn and soybeans writes Gary Schnitkey on the farmdocDaily website this week. Soybeans remain more profitable than corn in the University of Illinois agricultural economist’s crop budgets, but the difference between them has narrowed. Schnitkey says the risks of significant price declines have increased, particularly for soybeans and that hedging a large percentage of 2018 expected soybean production seems prudent.Current prices are higher than earlier in the winter. The central Illinois fall delivery bids on April 6, 2018 were $3.80 for corn and $10.00 per bushel for soybeans. Budgets based on these fall delivery bids are shown i…

NDSU’s Frayne Olson Talks Markets & the PNW

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NDSU’s Frayne Olson Talks Markets & the PNW
Frayne Olson, Agricultural Economist - North Dakota State UniveristyThe trading floor at North Dakota State University is extraordinary. Extension uses it to teach day trading lessons to farmers who need to take a longer outlook on the market place. Todd Gleason has more from the Fargo campus.

Spring Wheat, A Late Start, & Soybeans

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Spring Wheat, A Late Start, & Soybeans
Joel Ransom, Extension Cereal Grains Specialist - North Dakota State UniversityThe trade is already wondering what will come next if spring wheat doesn’t get planted across the northwestern corn belt. Todd Gleason traveled to Fargo to find out.

No Good Way for Perdue to Protect Farmers

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No Good Way for Perdue to Protect Farmers
Jonathan Coppess, Ag Policy Specialist - University of Illinois President Trump has asked the Secretary of Agriculture to protect U.S. farmers from the trade dispute with China. However, as Todd Gleason reports, there aren’t many options for Sonny Perdue.Last week Sonny Perdue was on the road for his second RV… 1:24 radio
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1:39 tv cg Last week Sonny Perdue was on the road for his second RV tour of farm country. His first tour was last summer. That’s when he told producers he would be their salesman to the world. Now he’s being asked to be their protector in the face of trade restrictions, some in place others proposed, as President Trump sets about rectifying what he sees as unfair trade with China. However, Perdue isn’t saying what he’ll do for farmers and there may be a good reason that’s the case says University of Illinois Ag Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess. Coppess :40 …that limits the crea…

Illinois 4-H'ers Package 1,000,000 Meals for the Hungry

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Illinois 4-H’ers Package 1,000,000 Meals for the Hungry
Bill Million, Extension Youth Development - University of Illinois

Wednesday night 4-H’ers in Illinois packaged their one-millionth meal to help feed the hungry. Todd Gleason was there and has the story.

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The weather was cold for the beginning of April, but the hearts were all warm. 4-H members and volunteers gathered in a shed to create and package up meals. It’s something they’ve been doing under the guidance of Illinois Extension’s Bill Million since 2013.

Million :20 That time was the same year we launched the 4-H Feeding & Growing Our Communities Initiative here in Illinois. Meal packaging has been one of the integral components of engaging 4-H members, 4-H clubs, and communities that address hunger and food insecurity here in Illinois.

That’s no small accomplishment. Feeding America puts the number of …

Jonathan Coppess Breaks Down Trump Trade Issues

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Jonathan Coppess Breaks Down Trump Trade Issues
Jonathan Coppess, Ag Policy Specialist - Univeristy of Illinois The first week of April has been tumultuous for American agriculture. Todd Gleason talks with Jonathan Coppess about how the Trump Administration has been handling trade with China, the NAFTA negotiations, and biofuels.

How to Properly Use Dicamba on Soybeans

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How to Properly Use Dicamba on Soybeans
Aaron Hager, University of Illinois

read farmdocdaily article

As the growing season approaches it is important for farmers to understand how to use dicamba on resistant soybean varieties. Todd Gleason has more with University of Illinois weed scientist Aaron Hager.



The following is an excerpt from the March 23 farmdocdaily article posted by University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager.

Steps for Successful Weed Management in Dicamba-Resistant Soybean

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plant dicamba soybean seed into a weed-free seedbedachieve a weed-free seedbed through the use of preplant tillage, an effective burndown herbicide(s), or a combination of tillage and burndown herbicides Step 2:
select and apply within 7 days of planting a soil-residual herbicide that targets your most problematic weed species; if desired (and labeled), add dicamba and an appropriate bufferfor waterhemp or Palmer amaranth, select a product containing the active ingredients from…

A New Firmer Tone for Corn Prices

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A New Firmer Tone for Corn Prices
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Last week’s USDA reports solidified the more positive outlook the trade has had for corn. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois with commodity markets specialist Todd Hubbs.

Cash Rents and the 2019 Growing Season

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Cash Rents and the 2019 Growing Season
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Professional farm managers in the state of Illinois have completed a cash rent survey. Todd Gleason reports it is a fairly go indicator of where cash rents in the state can be expected to go. He talked with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey about the results.

Dry Cows | 10 Steps for a Successful Transition Period

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Dry Cows | 10 Steps for a Successful Transition Period | Playlist
Phil Cardoso, Dairy Specialist - University of IllinoisNutrition and management of the dry dairy cow has been an area of extensive research over the last 25 years. Although nutritional requirements during this phase are fairly simple, the sudden transition from non-lactating to lactating state – as well as the physiologic and metabolic processes associated with it – make the transition period a fascinating and important stage of the production cycle of the dairy cow.

Avoid Invasives, Plant Natives this Spring

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Avoid Invasives, Plant Natives this Spring
Kelly Allsup, Horticulture - University of Illinois Extension Invasive plant species in our natural areas can wreak havoc for wildlife. These invasive plants can reduce nesting sites or add confusion for birds causing them to nest too early, reduce insect and pollinator food and habitat and drastically reduce native plant populations. Todd Gleason talks with Illinois Extension’s Kelly Allsup about native alternatives to some popular landscape plants.

Designing & Planting a Windbreak

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Designing & Planting a Windbreak
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionRight now may be a very good time to consider creating a windbreak for your home or farm. Todd Gleason has more on how with Duane Friend from University of Illinois Extension.

Exceptional Corn and Soybean Yields in 2017

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Exceptional Corn and Soybean Yields in 2017
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleMany areas of the country had above trend yields in 2017. While still not the majority, county yields of over 200 bushels per acre are becoming common and may be expected in the center of the corn-belt. Similarly, counties with over 60 bushels per acre are occurring with some regularity. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey.

Export Outlook for Soybean

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Export Outlook for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleRecent data on the soybean export pace indicates stronger weekly sales. This offers hope for meeting the USDA marketing year export projection. The size of the 2018 crop in South America and the competitiveness of U.S. export prices, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs, remain essential to determining U.S. export possibilities for the remainder of the marketing year.
ILLINOIS Ag Economist Todd Hubbs discusses the potential for U.S. soybean exports to meet USDA’s stated marketing year goal with Todd Gleason.

Trends in Farm Balance Sheets Over Time

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Trends in Farm Balance Sheets Over Time
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleTrends in the financial position of Illinois farms are presented in this article.
University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey explored Illinois Farm Business Farm Management balance sheets to see how they have changed over time. He discusses those changes with University of Illinois Extension Farm Broadcaster Todd Gleason.Overall, farms gained financial strength from 2006 to 2012. Since 2012, working capital has declined. The net worth and debt-to-asset position of most farms remain strong, but per acre net worth has decreased and the debt-to-asset ratios have increased in recent years. Those are worrisome trends. Future financial performance depends on returns. Likely financial performance given differing commodity prices are presented at the end of this article.

Estimating the March 1 Grains Stocks Report

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Corn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report.

The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is the quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand.



The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector.

He says most of the other use categories can be tracked, but that Feed and Residual category is different, “There is really no good idea as we move through the marketing year what that is going to be and I look at historical data and what the USDA is saying the number is going to be. USDA is currently saying 5.55 billion bush…

Estimating the March 1 Grains Stocks Report

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Corn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report.

The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is the quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand.



The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector.

He says most of the other use categories can be tracked, but that Feed and Residual category is different, “There is really no good idea as we move through the marketing year what that is going to be and I look at historical data and what the USDA is saying the number is going to be. USDA is currently saying 5.55 billion bush…

Last Call for Soybean Information

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Last Call for Soybean Information
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist (retired) - University of Illinois

Farmers are always complaining university research, because it is done in small plot trials, doesn’t reflect real world conditions. Todd Gleason reports, now is the time for them to go all in on a best management practices study for soybeans.

Land Grant university agronomists across the whole…
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Land Grant university agronomists across the whole of the corn belt have been asking producers for their production data. Emerson Nafziger is in charge for the state of Illinois. He says it’s not been easy to convince farmers to fill out a production practices survey.

Nafziger :41 …$50 gift card if they’ll fill out one of these forms.

Quote Summary - As our part of it here in Illinois we are supposed to collect data from about 500 soybean fields a year for each of those crop years. We have not gotten really very close to that, yet, so we are …

USDA’s Next Big Report Day is March 29

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USDA’s Next Big Report Day is March 29
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisCorn farmers across the planet are bracing themselves for the USDA report due out at the end of this month. Todd Gleason has this report….The agency has been surveying farmers…
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2:16 radio self-contained The agency has been surveying farmers in the Midwest to see how many acres of corn they expect to plant. That’s called the Prospective Plantings report. The other big item due at 11am central Thursday, March 29th is quarterly grain stocks number. It is nearly a census of some 9000 grain elevators and storage facilities across the United States to evaluate how much crop remains on hand. The tricky part of making this calculation says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is figuring the feed and residual usage for the livestock sector. Hubbs :31 …1.68 billion bushels of disappearance for the second quarter. Quote Summary - Most of the other use cat…

Hunger Summit at ILLINOIS March 15-17

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PUSH (Presidents United to Solve Hunger) is a consortium of universities from around the world that have the collective mission to end hunger and poverty, both locally and globally. Ninety university presidents from five continents have agreed to make food and nutrition security a priority on their campus—making ending hunger a core value of higher education institutions worldwide.

March 15-17 participants will meet at the i-Hotel on the University of Illinois campus. There is a free and open to the public session from 4-6pm Thursday, March 15.

Details are available online at https://publish.illinois.edu/push-conference/

the following organizations are supporting PUSH

Explaining the Illinois Extension Master Naturalist Program

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Explaining the Illinois Extension Master Naturalist Program
Dave Shiley, University of Illinois ExtensionThe Master Naturalist program is for nature lovers. It is offered through University of Illinois Extension and gives people the opportunity to expand their knowledge while volunteering in the community.

The Early Birds | a Master Naturalist Journal Entry

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The Early Birds | a Master Naturalist Journal Entry
Rose Moore, University of Illinois Extension Master Naturalistby Rose Moore, Illinois Extension Certified Master NaturalistJust about this time every winter, subtle changes begin to occur in the natural world. There still may be snow on the ground and in the air but that doesn’t seem to affect the invisible clocks of the creatures around us.Every morning as winter gradually lessons it’s grip, these changes become more noticeable to me. On this late February day, I immediately heard the noisy chatter of blackbirds as I stepped outside. This is a distinctive change from previously quiet mornings. Sure enough down near the creek a large flock of blackbirds could be seen in the honey locusts. I spotted a few red-winged blackbirds a distance away. Their cackles are the harbinger of spring to me as much as the robin. This chatter is a comfort to me and reminds me of childhood days spent outside in the spring.Hundreds of Europe…

Soil & Water Management Webinar for Certified Crop Advisors

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Soil & Water Management Webinar for Certified Crop Advisors
earn 4.5 hard to get Soil & Water Management CEU’s
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionCertified Crop Advisors in the state of Illinois looking for the hard to get Soil and Water Management credits should registered today for a University of Ilinois Extension Webinar. The soil and water management webinar will be held February 20 at locations around the state. Crop Advisors can earn 4.5 CEU’s, or Continuing Education Units, by attending. The cost is $45 and includes lunch and snack. The program runs from 9 to 2 Tuesday, February 20th. Check with your local Illinois Extension office for complete details.

Above Trend Yields or Higher Prices Needed to Break-Even in 2018

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Above Trend Yields or Higher Prices Needed to Break-Even in 2018
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleFarmers figuring crop budgets for this year will face an uncomfortable reality. In order to break-even on cash rented land, generally speaking, it will require above trend yields, higher prices, or some combination of the two. Todd Gleason has more…

Is It Time to Sell New Crop Soybeans

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Is It Time to Sell New Crop Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleSoybean prices rallied over the last week on increased uncertainty in South American soybean production and a weaker dollar. Soybean prices in the 2017–18 marketing year are following a very similar pattern to last marketing year and brings to the forefront the prospects of 2018 soybean sales. New crop cash bid prices for harvest in central Illinois recently ranged between $9.70 and $9.80. A prudent marketing plan for soybeans this year may possess some selling of new crop soybeans in this price rally says Todd Hubbs from the University of Illinois.

Can Corn Prices Get Above the Current Range

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Can Corn Prices Get Above the Current Range
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read the farmdocDaily articleMarch corn futures continue to trade between $3.48 and $3.60. This has been the case since the release of the November USDA supply and demand tables. It continues today despite the bearish information contained in USDA’s end of year reports released January 12. Todd Hubbs says corn prices continue to stay in relatively narrow range, and that pattern may remain for the next several weeks.
Listen to Todd Hubbs discussion of his farmdocDaily article with Univesity of Illinois Farm Broadcaster Todd GleasonThe University of Illinois grain markets specialist says the present outlook projects ample corn supplies in 2018. This will likely keep corn prices in the current range until information on spring planting is released. USDA’s Prospective Plantings report is due March 29th. Hubbs says a typical price pattern suggests a price rally in late spring …

Bad Weather Rising

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Bad Weather Rising
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois An agricultural economist at the University of Illinois is looking for a long-term recovery in the commodity markets. Todd Gleason has more on the reasons why.Commodity prices have been low since 2014…
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1:27 radio self-contained Commodity prices have been low since 2014, but the price of farmland has remained fairly strong. This is an indication thinks University of Illinois’ Scott Irwin that those buying farmland believe his contrarian view that prices will recover say to $4.00 for corn, $10.75 for soybeans, and $4.75 for all wheat. Irwin :20 …will restore profitability.Quote Summary - That’s at least one way to reconcile the firmness of land values. These long-run investors, whether they be farmers or outside investors, some reversions to averages like that which will restore profitability. Irwin says there are two reasons for commodity prices to increase. One of them is slow. It’s…

Returning to the New Era Corn Price Mid-Point

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Returning to the New Era Corn Price Mid-Point
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe agricultural economists at ILLINOIS have been championing a new era for grain prices since the rise of ethanol as a major player in the U.S corn market. Todd Gleason has more on why.Scott Irwin is an agricultural economist…
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2:57 radio self-contained Scott Irwin is an agricultural economist from the University of Illinois. He and his colleagues believe grain prices have achieved a new higher plateau era. An era that started just after Congress mandated renewable fuels be ramped up in the U.S. gasoline supply over a ten year period beginning in 2005. Irwin says it is the third such era.Irwin :25 …within a range during these eras.Quote Summary - The periods that I call eras of grain prices run from post World War II to 1973, from 1973 to 2006, and 2006 to the present. What we have found to date is that grain prices, unadjusted for inflation, tend to move wi…

MLK Day | A Chronology of Martin Luther King's Life

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MLK Day | A Chronology of Martin Luther King’s LifeThis is a self-contained audio file meant for air on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday in the United States.

Looking for Anaplasmosis in Beef Cattle

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Looking for Anaplasmosis in Beef Cattle
Teresa Steckler, Commercial Agriculture - Illinois Extension
Loy Hosselton, Beef Cattle Producer & Veterinarian - Clay City, Illinois

Researchers at the University of Illinois are working with beef cattle producers in the southern third of the state to determine the prevalence of a disease that causes cows to become listless and die. Todd Gleason has more…

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A cattle disease called anaplasmosis has been ramping up in southern Illinois, or at least that’s the way it appears. In short, it causes severe anemia. Illinois Extension’s Teresa Steckler, with funding from the Illinois Beef Association, has been pulling blood samples from herds in the area. She’s trying to determine if the strain of anaplasmosis is one called Mississippi that can be controlled by a vaccine, or if it is something else.

Steckler :35 …guys are reporting to me, the big black horse flies.

Quote Summary - I’…

Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat Acres in Illinois

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Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat Acres in Illinois
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Since 1996, acreage changes in Illinois have been primarily shifting between corn and soybean. Todd Gleason has more…1:37 radio
1:45 radio self-contained Between 1996 and 2017, the sum of acres planted to corn, soybeans, and wheat have varied within a tight band for the state of Illinois. It has ranged from 22.0 million to 22.7 million acres for the three crops. Over this period acreage planted to wheat has been small and declining. It has decreased from 1.7 million in 1996 to just half-a-million in 2017. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey says most of the acreage switches in the state have been between corn and soybeans. He makes note that this is a trend east of the Mississippi River, and while corn acres still out-number soybean in Illinois, that’s not the case in Ohio.Schnitkey :11 …and we are approaching near equality here in Illinois.…

Switches in Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat Acres | United States

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Switches in Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat Acres | United States
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisU.S. farmers have been shifting acres out of corn and into soybeans since 2012. This is likely because soybeans have been more profitable than corn. However, as Todd Gleason reports it is part of a larger trend that started in 1996.1996 is the year Congress passed a bill…
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3:041996 is the year Congress passed a bill informally called “Freedom to Farm”. It eliminated the set-aside programs for the primary row crops. These were supply-control measures. It freed farmers participating in government farm programs to plant whatever crop they wanted. It freed them, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey, to react to the marketplace. Schnitkey :31 …were more profitable than wheat.Quote Summary - From 1996 to 2012 we saw both corn and soybean acreages increase in the United States. This came, to a large extent, at the expense of …

IFES 2017: What Is Up with Soybean Yields

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IFES 2017: What Is Up with Soybean Yields
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily arcticleby Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisSoybean yields in the U.S. have been very high the last four years. The U.S. average yield set new records in a stair-step fashion each year between 2014 and 2016. The 2016 yield reached the remarkable level of 52.1 bushels. While not a record, the 2017 yield (based on the November 1 USDA estimate) was 49.5 bushels, the second largest ever. On top of the high U.S. average yields are the numerous reports of field-level yields in the 70s, 80s, and even a few in the 90s.The high soybean yields of recent years have sparked a debate about what is driving the exceptional yields. In thinking about this debate it is important to understand that there are only three possible sources of soybean yield gain. The first is weather during the growing season. The second is genetic improvement in soyb…

IFES 2017: Crop and Livestock Price Prospects for 2018

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IFES 2017: Crop and Livestock Price Prospects for 2018
Todd Hubbs, Commodity Markets Specialist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleby Todd Hubbs, Commodity Markets Specialist - University of IllinoisCROPSCrop prices will remain below the high levels seen in the early part of this decade due to large global inventories. Global economic growth continues to build on the momentum seen over the last year. Growth in China and emerging market in Asia is projected to remain strong throughout 2018. The prospects of improved growth support commodity demand, but the significant changes to trade policy could mitigate some of this demand growth in export markets. Lower prices are expected to continue in 2018 barring a shortfall in one of the major production regions. The following price outlook analysis assumes a good 2018 growing season.Corn prices continue to struggle with large crops and five consecutive years of growth in ending stocks. Domestic corn demand continues…

U.S. Crop Acreage Still Moving to Soybean

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U.S. Crop Acreage Still Moving to Soybean
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
farmdocDaily articleFarmers in the United States have been slowly switching their cropland to just two field crops. Todd Gleason reports on the move away from wheat and towards soybeans. Corn is king in the United States…
2:39 radio
2:48 radio self-contained Corn is king in the United States. Soybean has been on a swift move upward. And wheat acreage has been on the decline for about 40 years. About half-way through those 4 decades two important things happened. Congress passed the 1996 farm bill - often called Freedom to Farm because it eliminated the last vestiges of supply controls for program crops and Monsanto introduced Round-Up Ready soybeans, that was 1995. The latter made it a whole lot easier to raise beans and the former, says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey, let farmers react to the market. From 1996 to 2012 U.S. farmers increas…