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Showing posts from 2018

Reviewing Prices and Market Facilitation Payments

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Reviewing Prices and Market Facilitation Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

read farmdocDaily article



As the trade conflict with China continues, prices for many agricultural commodities remain relatively low. Illinois corn and soybean prices dipped to new lows in September, coinciding with the latest rounds of tariffs. The difference between selling an entire crop at spring forward bid prices compared to the September average cash prices makes a substantial difference in income on an average central Illinois grain farm. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey reviews how this plays out on a 1700 acre corn and soybean farm in Illinois this year, and what the prospects look like for next year.

Trump Admin Still Has Some Biofuels Work to Do

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Trump Admin Still Has Some Biofuels Work to Do
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Last Tuesday President Donald Trump made a campaign trip to Council Bluffs, Iowa. There, as Todd Gleason reports, he told a very excited crowd his administration would be backing corn farmers and ethanol. 2:14 radio
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2:27 tv cg The President leaned into the mic and gave corn farmers a little insider news they’ve been clamoring to hear since U.S. EPA pronounced gasoline blended with 15 percent ethanol would be ok to use in all cars made since 2001.Trump :08 …we are going with E15 year-round.Quote Summary - We are a little bit early. I shouldn’t say it now, but we are going with E15 year-round. Mr. Trump is a little early. Today E15 can be used about 9 months out of the year in much of the nation. During those other three months, the summer months, it has been prohibited. U.S. EPA will need to write some rules about how to make the yea…

Expected E15 Announcement No Big Deal

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Expected E15 Announcement No Big Deal
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

President Trump at his Council Bluffs, Iowa rally Tuesday is expected to announce a waiver to allow year-round use of gasoline blended with 15% ethanol (E15). Todd Gleason reports it may make little difference in how much corn is used to make ethanol.

2019 Illinois Crop Budgets are Dismal

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2019 Illinois Crop Budgets are Dismal
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisIf the numbers pan out next year will be dismal for Illinois grain farmers. Todd Gleason has more on the reasons why….The numbers look bad for Illinois grain farmers…
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1:24 radio self-containedThe numbers look bad for Illinois grain farmers next year. That’s the only conclusion Gary Schnitkey can draw when he puts the costs up against the incomes for corn and soybeans in 2019. Schnitkey, an ag economist at the Univesity of Illinois, says fuel and fertilizer costs are expected to go up. Prices aren’t and that’s the dismal part. Schnitkey :30 …what that has done to commodity prices.Quote Summary - Probably the one thing that has changed relative to recent years is that corn is expected to be more profitable than soybeans. Again, that is largely due to our use of $3.60 for a 2019 corn price and $8.50 for soybeans. This switches the profitability around. That’s drive…

New Lab Dedicated to Commodity Crop Bioprocessing

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New Lab Dedicated to Commodity Crop Bioprocessing
Vijay Singh, Director of IBRL - University of IllinoisThe market for commodity crops processed into new products is expected to more than double in the next six years to some 490 billion dollars. Todd Gleason reports the Univesity of Illinois is investing in the future of these agricultural innovations. Last week a new building was dedicated…
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1:42 radio self-contained(Sep 27, 2018) Last week a new building was dedicated on the Univeristy of Illinois campus in Urbana-Champaign. The Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory is designed to bridge the gap between discovery and commercialization. IBRL’s director, Vijay Singh, says every year some 250 invention disclosures are filed at the University of Illinois. Most are never commercialized because there isn’t a proof of concept facility to scale up new ways to process ethanol or other agricultural biofuels. The labs in IBRL, Singh says, will do just that.Singh :…

African Swine Fever from China to Europe

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African Swine Fever from China to Europe
Jim Lowe, DVM - University of Illinois We’ve been hearing a great deal lately about a pig disease called African Swine Fever. Soybean traders in Chicago worry it will have a negative impact on feed usage in China. Todd Gleason has more on the disease and its spread.1:44 radio
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2:04 tv cgASF, as the name implies, developed in Africa. It moved from there to Europe about ten years ago says University of Illinois veterinarian Jim Lowe. He was doing some heavy yard work when we caught up with him. Lowe :32 …it has moved into eastern Europe over time here.Quote Summary - The virus is interesting because it survives outside the host really well. So, in meat or meat products or tissue it lives. We think the virus was brought to Europe from Africa in some meat. We don’t know for sure, but that is the most likely explanation. About ten years ago it was introduced into the wild boar population in Europe. It ha…

Friday's USDA Grain Stocks Report Preview

Friday the United States Department of Agriculture will tally how much of last year’s corn and soybean crops are still left in the bin around the nation. The Grain Stocks report is more of a census of what’s on hand than an estimate. This is because USDA collects information from more than 9000 grain elevators, terminals, and other storage facilities around the United States. It helps them to determine the total number of last year’s bushels on hand as of the first day of September. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs says his calculations aren’t far off from what USDA has already projected the report should show, “For corn, in particular, it will come down to the feed and residual number and how much feed was used in the fourth quarter of the 2017/18 marketing year and it looks like soybeans are on track to hit the projection USDA currently has.”USDA’s ending stocks figure from the September World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates report for soybeans is 395…

Friday's USDA Grain Stocks Report Preview*

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Friday’s USDA Grain Stocks Report Preview
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Friday the United States Department of Agriculture will tally how much of last year’s corn and soybean crops are still left in the bin around the nation. Todd Gleason has more on what the agency is expected to find. The Grain Stocks report is more of a census…
2:12 radio 2:21 radio self-contained The Grain Stocks report is more of a census of what’s on hand than an estimate. This is because USDA collects information from more than 9000 grain elevators, terminals, and other storage facilities around the United States. It helps them to determine the total number of last year’s bushels on hand as of the first day of September. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs says his calculations aren’t far off from what USDA has already projected the report should show. Hubbs :14 …on track to hit the projection USDA currently has. Quotes Summary - For corn, in parti…

2019 Crop Budgets Suggest Dismal Corn and Soybean Returns

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2019 Crop Budgets Suggest Dismal Corn and Soybean Returns
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois farmdocDaily articleEven with cost-cutting and savings measures, University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey says, for the moment, it seems unlikely farmers will have positive returns on rented farmland in 2019. Todd Gleason has more…I’m University of Illinois Extension’s Todd Gleason…
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Small Refinery Exemptions and Ethanol Demand Destruction

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Small Refinery Exemptions and Ethanol Demand Destruction
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois farmdocDaily articleThere is widespread interest in whether small refinery exemptions (SREs) under the RFS have “destroyed” demand for ethanol in the physical market. Todd Gleason discusses the point with University of Illinois agricultural economist Scott Irwin.I’m University of Illinois Extension’s Todd Gleason… 8:09

How Does the 2019 Acreage Mix Change

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How Does the 2019 Acreage Mix Change
Frayne Olson, Agricultural Economist - North Dakota State University VOICERIf the Trump Administration trade and tariff policies continue for very much longer it will cause farmers to plant different crops next year says North Dakota State University’s Frayne Olson. Olson :15 …a very large variety of other crops. Quote Summary - More than likely we’ll see a pretty drastic reduction at least in soybeans. In this region, in particular, the southeast (of North Dakota) because we’ve been rotating soybeans pretty hard in this area. What do we switch to? A combination of corn and spring wheat are the two obvious ones, but we do grow a very large variety of other crops. The problem with this kind of switch is that it’s likely to produce an overabundance of corn in 2019.

Trump Trade Policy Crashes Soybean Basis

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Trump Trade Policy Crashes Soybean Basis
Frayne Olson, Agricultural Economist - North Dakota State University

The Trump Administration trade and tariff dispute with China has caused the cash price of soybeans in the United States to tumble. Todd Gleason has more on the impact this year and next.

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China, the number one destination for all U.S. soybeans, has stopped buying because of the President’s trade policies. Normally those bushels would be exported via the PNW (the Pacific Northwest) grain export terminals. That gate has closed says NDSU’s Frayne Olson and now all those bushels are expected to try and move through the other export gate at the Port of New Orleans.

Olson :20 …magic number is depends upon where you are.

Quote Summary - The challenge we have in the soybean market is that the basis levels are trying to choke off the inflow of grain. Local basis is all about what’s the inflow rate versus the outflow rate. The problem is ou…

Selling Soybeans Across the Scale

This week an ag economist from the University of Illinois has penned an article for the farmdocDaily website which explores the price of soybeans and how the Trump administration trade policies have changed how the oilseed is moved across the planet. Todd Gleason has more on what this means for farmers trying to sell the crop into the world market.This fall farmers will harvest a record sized soybean crop. USDA says about 4.7 billion bushels. They’ll need a home and farmers in North Dakota are really worried. About 2/3rds of their crop is shipped by rail to the Pacific Northwest for export to China. The Trump administration trade policies have mostly closed that market says North Dakota Senator Heidi Heitkamp, “What I would tell you is not only have you disrupted the markets and we have taken a haircut, you may not be able to sell them which is something I’ve been talking about for a long time.” Heitkamp was speaking to farmers in Fargo at the Big Iron farm show this week. The cash pr…

Selling Soybeans Across the Scale

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Selling Soybeans Across the Scale
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp - North DakotaThis week an ag economist from the University of Illinois has penned an article for the farmdocDaily website which explores the price of soybeans and how the Trump administration trade policies have changed how the oilseed is moved across the planet. Todd Gleason has more on what this means for farmers trying to sell the crop into the world market.This fall farmers will harvest a record sized soybean…
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1:58 tv cg This fall farmers will harvest a record sized soybean crop. USDA says about 4.7 billion bushels. They’ll need a home and farmers in North Dakota are really worried. About 2/3rds of their crop is shipped by rail to the Pacific Northwest for export to China. The Trump administration trade policies have mostly closed that market says North Dakota Senator Heidi Heitkamp.Heitkamp :11 …been t…

Market Mitigation Signup | an interview with Gary Schnitkey

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Market Mitigation Signup | an interview with Gary Schnitkey
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisSign up for the trade and tariff compensation package from the United State Department of Agriculture is open. Todd Gleason has more on how and when farmers and landlords should fill out the paperwork.Gary Schnitkey now joins us from the University… 5:52

Marketing Corn & Soybeans this Fall

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Marketing Corn & Soybeans this Fall
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The dramatic fall in the price of corn and soybeans earlier in the year has put farmers in a unique marketing position. They must decide how much of the drop is due to the expected bumper crop size of the harvest and how much comes from the Trump Administration trade policies. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs says determining when those disputes might be settled is key to making good marketing decisions.Well it is a really tough marketing year…
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Great Corn Grind, but Ethanol Stocks are Building

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Great Corn Grind, but Ethanol Stocks are Building
Dan O’Brien, Kansas State University Extension Dan O’Brien from Kansas State University discusses the state of ethanol production and stocks. While grind has been tremendous, stocks are building, and plant profitability looks to be near breakeven. Todd Gleason has more with O’Brien.We are now joined by Dan O’Brien… 5:57

2018 Cash Rents were up $5/acre in Illinois

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2018 Cash Rents were up $5/acre in Illinois
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois


University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey discusses the surprise $5 an acre cash rent increase seen in the state wide 2018 survey numbers and how farm economics look going into the 2019 growing season.

by USDA NASS
see the 2018 USDA Land Values Survey

Agricultural Land Values Highlights

The United States farm real estate value, a measurement of the value of all land and buildings on farms, averaged $3,140 per acre for 2018, up $60 per acre (1.9 percent) from 2017 values.


Regional changes in the average value of farm real estate ranged from an 8.3 percent increase in the Southern Plains region to 1.4 percent decrease in the Northern Plains region. The highest farm real estate values were in the Corn Belt region at $6,430 per acre. The Mountain region had the lowest farm real estate value at $1,140 per acre.


The United States cropland value averaged $4…

Tough Marketing Decisions for New Crop Soybeans

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Tough Marketing Decisions for New Crop Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
A new article posted to the farmdocDaily website suggests farmers will have a very tough time making marketing decisions related to this year’s soybean crop. Todd Gleason reports from the University of Illinois that this is because prices are low with prospects for little to change overtime unless a trade deal is struck with China.by Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
link to farmdocDaily articleNovember soybean futures prices dropped significantly after the release of the August USDA reports. The November futures price closed at $8.93 on August 17, higher last week on the news involving recent developments in trade negotiations with China. The sensitivity of soybean prices to trade issues and the potential for large yields create difficult marketing decisions for new crop soybeans.Numerous issues look to keep new crop marketing decisions dif…

AirScout Precision Agriculture Startup

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AirScout Precision Agriculture Startup
Brian Sutton, AirScout Founder & President - Champaign, Illinois A startup on the south end of the University of Illinois campus @UIResearchPark is using thermal imaging to help precision agriculture become prescription agriculture. Todd Gleason has more on how AirScout @AirScoutInc is helping farmers take advantage of their precision-guided equipment.

EPA Wheeler Senate Hearing

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EPA Wheeler Senate Hearing
Andrew Wheeler, Acting Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyThis morning, during a U.S. Senate hearing, Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler answered questions about ethanol, biofuels, the RFS, and small refinery waivers. He appears to be holding the same line Scott Pruitt took during his time at the helm of the agency with some notable differences. Wheeler told U.S. Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa…
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2:55 radio self-contained Wheeler told U.S. Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa that EPA is looking for ways to improve transparency as it is related to the issuance of small refinery waivers. It is the reallocation of the waived ethanol gallons which has raised the ire of farm country politicians… that’s because EPA has seen fit not to reallocate those gallons to larger refineries. Here’s a portion of the exchange between Senator Ernst and Acting Administrator Wheeler. Ernst & Wheeler :58 …but we are confined by the law. Ernst …

Trade Tariff Farmer Compensation Package

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Trade Tariff Farmer Compensation Package
Chief Economist Rob Johansson, USDA
USDA Assistant Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, Brad KarmenUSDA has announced a $12 billion dollar plan to compensate farmers for damages done so far by the trade dispute with China and other nations. Todd Gleason has more on what is known about the plan.The largest part of that money will be paid out… 2:43 radio
2:56 radio self-contained The largest part of that money will be paid out to soybean producers, though direct payments will also be made for other commodities including corn, wheat, sorghum, cotton, dairy, and pork. USDA Chief Economist Rob Johansson told reporters on the line the initial damage calculation has already been made. Johansson :40 …the program will be flexible to allow that.Quote Summary - We’ve calculated what the damage is to producers facing these illegal tariff actions. We are working out the specific details and will be working it out as a rule making action in a…

Breeding Barley to Make Budweiser

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Breeding Barley to Make Budweiser
Josh Butler, Senior Manager Global Barley Breeding - Anheuser BuschYou might think of Anheuser Busch as a beverage company producing great American beers like Budweiser. However, as Todd Gleason reports from Idaho Falls, Idaho, it is a highly integrated agricultural company. AB InBev develops and tests its own barley varieties…
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1:32 tv self-containedAB InBev develops and tests its own barley varieties. Josh Butler is the senior manager for Global Barley Breeding. During this year’s Grower Days he explained to the farmers who raise barley for Anheuser Busch that his group has three main customers. There is the maltster, beer is made from malted barley; the brewer, the malt needs to be consistent in its enzyme and protein make up; and most importantly, he says, the farmer. Butler :07 …agronomics that are beneficial to a grower. Quote Summary: So, really, ultimately, the first goal is yield. Yield…

A Commodity Markets Interview with Todd Hubbs

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A Commodity Markets Interview with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe commodity markets seemed to have found a bottom for the moment. Todd Gleason has more on what may be next with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs.

Fungicides for Corn Yield Kick, Yeah No

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Fungicides for Corn Yield Kick, Yeah No
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisFarmers are always under pressure to spend more money to protect their crop from insect pests and diseases. Todd Gleason has one more thing they probably shouldn’t use. In the case of fungicides corn producers…
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1:17 radio self-contained In the case of fungicides corn producers will hear about the potential for yield increases. The odds are against that says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski (kleh-cheh-ski).Kleczewski :38 …save yourself the money. That’s kind of my thought. Quote Summary - It is not consistent. You are probably less than 30% of the time that you are going to see anything. And as I have mentioned in some of my talks and some my posts, your may reason to apply a fungicide should be to prevent disease and that is when you are going to see the most benefit. If you are applying it thinking that maybe 30% of…

When Farmers Should Spray for Japanese Beetles

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When Farmers Should Spray for Japanese Beetles
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of IllinoisJapanese beetles are showing up in corn and soybean fields. These can do enough damage to cause yield losses, but it is fairly unlikely. Todd Gleason has more…The University of Illinois has published thresholds…
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1:26 radio self-containedThe University of Illinois has published thresholds for when farmers should spray crops to protect them from the Japanese beetle. Nick Seiter says there needs to be a lot of beetles and a whole lot damage done before a producer should spend money on a rescue treatment. Seiter :41 …the field while pollination is still ongoing. Quote Summary - Most of the reports that I am getting, as you would expect and as is typical, are below the treatment thresholds. These are 25 percent defoliation after bloom and 35 percent before bloom for soybean and the threshold for silk clipping in corn is consistent clipping to half-an-inch or le…

EPA's Biofuels Proposal May Contradict Congressional Intent

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EPA’s Biofuels Proposal May Contradict Congressional Intent
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The biofuels proposal U.S. EPA put forth this week appears to give the agency authority Congress did not intend. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois. The proposed rulemaking asserts…
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2:22 tv cgThe proposed rulemaking asserts EPA’s right to extend small refinery waivers without reallocating the congressionally mandated gallons. In this case that would be corn-based ethanol blended into the nation’s regular gasoline supply at the rate of no more than 15 billion gallons annually says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin.Irwin :28 …not sure that they will be able to make that hold.Quote Summary - It seems like that could be challenged in court. It is easy to establish that this was the most important policy decision EPA had to make for this rulemaking and it said “no way, n…

McDonald's Uses 2% of the U.S. Beef Supply

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McDonald’s Uses 2% of the U.S. Beef Supply
Rickette Collins, Sr. Director Global Supply Chain - McDonald’s CorporationHave you seen those fresh beef quarter pounder commercials from McDonald’s? That campaign has been running since March. It is working, and as Todd Gleason reports some Illinois beef producers found out just how well at their association’s summer conference in Galena. 1:30 radio
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1:46 tv cgA senior supply director for McDonald’s made an hour-long presentation to those farmers. They raise some of the beef used at its restaurants. Rickette Collins told them the fresh beef campaign has been a big success. Collins :10 …68% increase in Quarter Pounder sales.Quote Summary - So, in the U.S. we’ve just launched our fresh quarter-pound beef patties and we’ve seen tremendous success with about a 68% increase in Quarter Pounder sales.That was the initial uptick, but the thing is the fresh beef push has been hanging on to a lot of those…

KILL 9am Jun 22 | Farm Bill Vote Friday

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KILL 9am Jun 22 | Farm Bill Vote Friday
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois The House of Representatives is set to vote Friday (today) on a version of the farm bill that failed earlier in the year. Todd Gleason has more from the Univeristy of Illinois on how the vote may go, what the bill contains, and how it compares to the Senate’s version of the legislation.

Nothing to do about Seedling Diseases in Soybean

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Nothing to do about Seedling Diseases in Soybean
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisSoybean seed treatments aren’t working at the moment and there’s nothing a farmer can do. Todd Gleason has more from east central Illinois.1:47 radio
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2:01 tv cgIf you drive around much you’ll have noted some drown out areas in soybean fields, probably across the whole of the corn belt. Those are pretty easy to spot, but there are some areas that look like they’ve not been underwater - at least not for very long, if at all. They’re wilted back and showing signs of seedling diseases says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski. Kleczewski :20 …are well past that point now. Quote Summary - Why am I seeing these diseases now? You must remember these soybeans have been in the ground for 30 or 40 days and seed treatments are going to only give us two to three weeks of protection. Under perfect cond…

Replacing Petrochemicals with Biochemicals made from Corn

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Replacing Petrochemicals with Biochemicals made from Corn
Vijah Singh, Agricultural Engineer - University of IllinoisFarmers gathered in St. Louis this week (June 4, 5, 6) to learn about future uses for the nation’s number one commodity crop. Todd Gleason has more from the Corn Utilization Technology Conference. CUTC happens every two years…
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2:02 tv cg CUTC happens every two years. It is a conference dedicated to future uses of corn. Vijay Singh is a regular. He works for the agricultural college at the University of Illinois and specializes in engineering ethanol processing plants. He sees them expanding to include biochemical production in the near future. Singh :23 …comes from the corn processing industry.Quote Summary - You know chemicals have been around, but they come from petroleum sources. Now what we are doing is rather than using petroleum sources is using renewable sources. That’s the big thing right now and for that we ne…

Corn Growth Stage and Post-Emergence Herbicides

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Corn Growth Stage and Post-Emergence Herbicides
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois The month of May was one of the warmest on record across the Midwest. That heat has the corn crop growing really fast. As Todd Gleason reports, this means farmers will be short on time to get post-emergence herbicide applications done. The labels of most post-emergence corn…
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1:38 tv cg The labels of most post-emergence corn herbicides allow applications at various crop growth stages, but almost all product labels also indicate a maximum growth stage beyond which broadcast applications should not be made says University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager. Hager :15 …twelve inch corn cutoff height.For product labels that indicate a specific corn height and growth state, Hager says farmers should be sure to follow the more restrictive of the two. Hager :18 …go with the development stage instead of the corn height.The …

Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials

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Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of Illinois When farmers want to know how well an insecticide works they turn to their Land Grant University for unbiased information. Todd Gleason has more from the western corn rootworm trials on the Urbana-Champaign campus. This little four row planter is outfitted…
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2:00 tv cgThis little four-row planter is outfitted with some pretty high tech stuff. All of which must be calibrated before it goes to the field where it will be used to plant a western corn rootworm trial. A trial that will assess how well twelve different current in-furrow liquid and granular insecticides work. Well, at least some of them are current products, others are experimentals says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter. Seiter :25 …how effective they are.Quote Summary - We like to evaluate all the different options that are out there. There is alw…

How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans

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How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe President has been tweeting about agriculture. He says the potential deal with China will result in “massive” export increases for farm commodities. Most have taken this to mean, at a minimum, that the flow of soybeans will be increased. University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs has been pondering the implications and the deal. Hubbs 4:04 …but a large increase is going to put a lot of pressure on prices. Todd Hubbs specializes is row crop commodity marketing at the University of Illinois. You may read his thoughts on marketing soybeans in today’s (this week’s) post to the farmdocDaily website.

Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans

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Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Farmers, as we enter the last half of May, are nearing the end of the spring planting season and they are turning their attention again to the marketplace. Todd Gleason has more on how one agricultural economist sees prices playing out for the year. We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes…
2:47 radio 3:04 radio self-contained We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes in the Supply and Demand tables for each commodity, the season’s average price. For corn, that number - at the midpoint - is $3.80. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is a bit more optimistic. He has it at $4.05. His soybean price, however, is less than USDA’s. The agency has it at $10.00 a bushel. Hubbs puts it at $9.45. The difference in viewpoint says Hubbs lands squarely on soybean exports.Hubbs :36 …whats going on currently in the market.Quote Summary - When we look forwa…

Projected Cutting Dates for Black Cutworm in Corn

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Projected Cutting Dates for Black Cut Worm in Corn
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of IllinoisFarmers should be on the look out for black cut worm in their corn fields. Todd Gleason has more…1:34 radio
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0:44 tv voicerThe earliest projected cutting date is this week in Montgomery County. University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter says fields especially at risk to having plants cut by the black cut worm include those with later planted corn and those sown into grassy weeds or a late terminated cover crop. Seiter :44 …to initiate a treatment. Quote Summary - What you are going to want to do is to scout your field. Look for plants lying on the ground that appear to have been cut with scissors. This is different looking than damage from a bird digging up the plant looking for the seed. These corn plants will be cut off. When you start finding that, scrape around in the residue looking for the larvae. The black cut worm l…

May 10 | USDA WASDE ReAct with Todd Hubbs

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May 10 | USDA WASDE ReAct with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The monthly WASDE report for May 2018 introduced the first look at the new crop corn and soybean supply & demand tables. Todd Gleason has more with University of Illinois commodity markets specialist Todd Hubbs.

Soybean Crush Continues Strength

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Soybean Crush Continues Strength
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisby Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleSoybean crush levels picked up substantially over the last few months due to strong crush margins. Driven by production issues in Argentina, the increase in crush margin recently is attributed to rapid growth in soybean meal prices. For the 2017–08 marketing year, the USDA currently projects the domestic crush at 1.97 billion bushels, up 3.6 percent from last marketing year. Soybean meal use needs to build on recent progress to meet or exceed the current crush projection.Soybean crush during the first half of the marketing year from September 2017 through February 2018 equaled 1010.6 million bushels, 3.5 percent greater than the total of the previous year. The USDA’s current projection indicates a 3.6 percent increase for the year and implies that the crush during the last half of the year will b…

Soil-borne Plant Disease Trials @ Illinois

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Soil-borne Plant Disease Trials @ Illinois
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisOver the next few years, companies will release new and updated ways to use seed treatments to control soil-borne diseases in corn and soybeans. Todd Gleason reports researchers at the University of Illinois are looking to assess how well each of these might work. One of the first steps in the scientific…
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1:17 tv cgOne of the first steps in the scientific process is to lay out the trials. In this case that means intentionally inoculating the area with a disease says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski (kleh-cheh-skee).Kleczewski :13 …getting those in the ground.Quote Summary - We are putting in some different soybean and corn trials today looking at different seed treatments for controlling seed-borne diseases. So, we have some pythium trials, some SDS trials, and some rhizoctonia tr…

ILLINOIS Plant Pathology Plots | an interview with Nathan Kleczewski

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ILLINOIS Plant Pathology Plots | an interview with Nathan Kleczewski
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of Illinois Farm Broadcaster Todd Gleason talks with the University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist about his research work on the south-farms.

Yield Implications of Delayed Corn Planting

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Yield Implications of Delayed Corn Planting
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleThe late spring has many worried. Others are confident farmers can plant a corn crop in 5 working days. Todd Gleason reports, University of Illinois agricultural economists have gone through the USDA data to see if this is true and what impact a late planting season might have on corn yields. 1:35 radio
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2:00 tv cg (TV ONLY) The grand prairie of Illinois is still lying dormant. It’s soils are just beginning to reach that magical 50 degree mark. That’s when the corn planters begin to roll. (RADIO START HERE) It’s a late start to the season this year, and despite the increased size of the machinery University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin says it’ll still take about as much time to plant the corn crop this season as it did nearly 30 years ago. Irwin :15 …to get the job done.Quote Summary - If we ar…

A Late Planting Season Lesson

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A Late Planting Season Lesson
Mike Tannura, T-storm Weather - Chicago, IllinoisThe late start to the growing season in the corn belt and the northern plains has farmers and traders worried. But, as a commodity marketing class at the University of Illinois found out this/last week (April 18) there is much more to be learned from the data. Todd Gleason has more…This 400 level agricultural college class taught…
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1:58 tv cg This 400 level agricultural college class taught by Scott Irwin includes guest lectures by Illinois alum involved in price discovery. In this case, Mike Tannura from T-storm Weather in Chicago is teaching them about how the weather and the markets work together. Right now he tells them is a good example of a weather market. The cold, the snow storms, the damp air hasn’t allowed farmers from Ohio to North Dakota to really begin the planting season.Tannura :15 …then everybody is going to fall behind.Quote Summary -…

Planting Dates and Acreage Switches in North Dakota

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Planting Dates and Acreage Switches in North Dakota
Hans Kandel, Broadleaf Crops Specialist - North Dakota State University The ground is still frozen in North Dakota and that means farmers have yet to turn a wheel for the planting season. The trade has been wondering what it might mean for the eventual acreage mix as it relates to spring wheat and soybeans. Todd Gleason explores the issue with NDSU Extension.

2018 Acreage Decisions: Steady as She Goes in Rough Waters

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2018 Acreage Decisions: Steady as She Goes in Rough Waters
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisread farmdocDaily articleThe price of corn and soybeans has been swinging on trade threats and changing acreage mixes in the United States. However, those price movements have yet to change the relative profitability between corn and soybeans writes Gary Schnitkey on the farmdocDaily website this week. Soybeans remain more profitable than corn in the University of Illinois agricultural economist’s crop budgets, but the difference between them has narrowed. Schnitkey says the risks of significant price declines have increased, particularly for soybeans and that hedging a large percentage of 2018 expected soybean production seems prudent.Current prices are higher than earlier in the winter. The central Illinois fall delivery bids on April 6, 2018 were $3.80 for corn and $10.00 per bushel for soybeans. Budgets based on these fall delivery bids are shown i…

NDSU’s Frayne Olson Talks Markets & the PNW

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NDSU’s Frayne Olson Talks Markets & the PNW
Frayne Olson, Agricultural Economist - North Dakota State UniveristyThe trading floor at North Dakota State University is extraordinary. Extension uses it to teach day trading lessons to farmers who need to take a longer outlook on the market place. Todd Gleason has more from the Fargo campus.