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Showing posts from February, 2017

Estimated 2016 ARC-CO Payments

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Estimated 2016 ARC-CO Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA-NASS) has released the county yields for the 2016 crop year. Todd Gleason tells us these, along with some other estimates, can be used to project the ARC-County (ark) payments farmers and landowners around the nation will receive in October. ARC-County payments are part of the federal…
1:04 radio
1:22 radio self-containedARC-County payments are part of the federal government’s safety net program for American farmers authorized in 2014. The final calculations for the payments to be made this fall won’t be completed for another six months, but Gary Schnitkey from the University of Illinois says there is enough information available to make a good guess at the numbers. Schnitkey :16 …there are some larger payments as well.Quote Summary - There are some larger payments on ARC-County for corn. Those occur mainly in the eastern corn …

Estimated 2016 ARC-CO Payments

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Estimated 2016 ARC-CO Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

FOR BROADCAST

(Thursday, Feb 23, 2017) Yesterday the National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA-NASS) released the county yields for the 2016 crop year. These, along with some other estimates, can be used to project the ARC-County (ark) payments farmers and landowners around the nation will receive in October. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois…

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5:21 running time


FOR WEB

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On February 23rd, the National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) released county yields for the 2016 crop year. With these yield estimates, fairly accurate estimates of 2016 Agricultural Risk Coverage at the county level (ARC-Co) can be obtained. We present maps showing estimated payments per base acre for corn, soybeans, and wheat. Also shown are maps giving 2016 county yields relative to benchmark yields. A table showing estimated payments per cou…

Global Trade of Agricultural Commodities Expected to Grow

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Global Trade of Agricultural Commodities Expected to Grow
Robert Johannson, Chief Economist - United States Department of AgricultureChina purchases two-thirds of the soybeans traded on the planet. Todd Gleason has more on this and other markets for U.S. crops. Over the next ten years, USDA expects global soybean…
1:40 radio
1:47 radio self-contained Over the next ten years, USDA expects global soybean trade to increase by 25% and that Chinese purchases will account for 85% of the increase. The numbers were presented at the Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington D.C., (today, Thursday, Feb 23, 2017) by USDA Chief Economist Rob Johannson. He says the projections are based on the assumption the number of middle-class households in China will double to nearly 250 million by the year 2024. Johannson :14 …India is expected to triple by 2024.Quote Summary - Those households will start demanding more meat, protein, and processed foods in their diet. And looking to other potent…

February Application of NH3 O.K.

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VOICER
February Application of NH3 O.K.
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of IllinoisThe warm weather in the Midwest has farmers itching to go to the field to get some pre-season work done. University of Illinois Extension Agronomist Emerson Nafziger says it is ok to apply anhydrous ammonia to corn acres.Nafziger :16 …that’s the most important thing. Quote Summary - It is o.k. to do it. I would liken it more to a fall application than a spring application. The good news is soil conditions are pretty good right now because we haven’t had much rain (across the state) in February. That’s the most important thing. Again, Nafziger says as long as soil conditions are good, a late winter anhydrous ammonia application should work just like a fall application.

2017 Corn Prospects

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2017 Corn Prospects
Todd Hubbs, Grain Markets Specialist - University of IllinoisThe grain marketing specialist at the University of Illinois has been thinking a lot about the coming growing season. Todd Gleason has more on how the balance sheet for corn may look.A balance sheet is just what it sounds like…
2:55 radio
3:07 radio self-containedA balance sheet is just what it sounds like. It adds up on the available supplies and then subtracts all of the demand. It is often times called a supply and demand table. The grain markets specialist at the University of Illinois has been developing his S&D table for corn. It starts, says Todd Hubbs, with the number of acres he believes farmers will plant this year. Hubbs :19 …it may even come in a little bit higher.Quote Summary - When I look forward into 2017/17 on the supply side I see a reduction in corn acreage. I put it at 91.5 which is a 3.5 million acre reduction from 2016. It could be more than that, the numbers are all…

2017 Corn Prospects | an interview with Todd Hubbs

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2017 Corn Prospects | an interview with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Grain Markets Specialist - University of Illinoissources
FarmDocDaily Article
Congressional Budge Office (CBO) Projections
USDA Long-Term Projections, February 2017by Todd Hubbs, Grain Specialist - University of Illinois The time of year to develop corn balance sheet projections for the upcoming crop year is upon us. As we approach the halfway point of the 2016–17 marketing year, decision making regarding planting and new crop marketing get determined. The expectations for corn in the 2017 crop year put forth in this analysis show lower production leading to decreased ending stocks in 2017–18. The magnitude of reduced ending stocks provides important implications for corn prices moving through 2017–18.Current market consensus projects farmers to plant fewer corn acres in 2017 than the 94 million acres planted in 2016. As discussed previously, numerous factors point toward greater soybean acreage and lower corn ac…

Casting a Data Science Company | an interview with Robb Fraley

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Casting a Data Science Company | an interview with Robb Fraley
Robb Fraley, Chief Technology Officer - MonsantoMonsanto used to be a chemical company that made herbicides. It then transitioned to a genetic-traits company that produced seeds. Now, as it is set to merge with Bayer, the Chief Technology Officer for Monsanto looks to be casting the St. Louis based agricultural giant into the data-science world of Apple and Samsung. Todd Gleason has this interview with Robb Fraley from the 2017 Illinois Soybean Summit in Peoria.

2017 Projected Incomes on Illinois Grain Farms

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2017 Projected Incomes on Illinois Grain Farms
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois A new article from the University of Illinois projects lower farm incomes in the state this year. Todd Gleason has more…Net incomes for Illinois grain farms are projected to be lower…
3:09 radio
3:18 radio self containedNet incomes for Illinois grain farms are projected to be lower this year than last. If this University of Illinois estimate holds, writes agricultural economist Gary Schnitkey on the farmdocdaily website, the weakening financial position of farms in the state will worsen. The last half decade has really changed the financial picture for farmers says Schnitkey. Schnitkey :35 …enough to maintain the financial position of farms.Quote Summary - So we had high incomes from 2010 to 2012 and every year since 2012 we’ve been on a downward trend through 2015. This is when we hit a $500 per farm average net income on Illinois grain farms enrolled in FBFM. T…

2017 Soybean Prospects

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2017 Soybean Prospects
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Farmers around the nation are expected to plant more soybeans than usual this spring. There are many reasons this might be the case, but only one price outcome if things on the planet remain the same. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois.Supply and demand drive price…
2:16 radio
2:30 radio self contained Supply and demand drive price. It is a simple concept, and one farmers deal with every day. However, trying to forecast supply and demand is much harder. Todd Hubbs from the University of Illinois starts each season by considering where price might go if supply and demand remain as expected. He’s posted his 2017/18 marketing year soybean forecast to the farmdocdaily website. The agricultural economist says there are three things he sees.Hubbs :23 …for 2017/18 based on those numbers.Quote Summary - Increased acreage. Increased ending stocks. Lower prices. Now, just how much …

2017 Soybean Prospects | an interview with Todd Hubbs

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2017 Soybean Prospects | an interview with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois There are three points University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs says farmers need to remember about soybeans this year; acreage, stocks, and price.

The Mild Winter & Spring Insects

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The Mild Winter & Spring Insects
Kelly Estes, Entomologist - PRI ISWS - University of Illinois The very mild winter in Illinois has caused many people to wonder if there will be more bugs to contend with this spring. Todd Gleason has more on the outlook with a University of Illinois based entomologist.

Stink Bugs Invading Illinois Homes

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Stink Bugs Invading Illinois Homes
Kelly Estes, Entomologist - PRI ISWS - University of Illinois A new kind of stink bug is making a big move in Illinois. Todd Gleason files this report on why people are finding the shield-shaped insect in their homes, and how the bugs may impact yards, gardens, and farms.

Consider Using ARP for Soybeans

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Consider Using ARP for Soybeans
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
farmdoc daily source articleIt seems likely the price of soybeans at harvest this fall could be much lower than it is now. Todd Gleason reports one of the options a farmer might consider because of this potential is choosing a different crop insurance plan. Federal crop insurance comes in two basic revenue protection…
3:04 radio
3:19 radio self-containedFederal crop insurance comes in two basic revenue protection forms, R-P and A-R-P. R-P stands for Revenue Protection and A-R-P stands for Area Risk Protection. The difference between the two says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey is simple enough to understand. Schnitkey :23 …rather the farm yield for RP. Quote Summary - RP is what most people buy, Revenue Protection. It is a farm level product and makes payments based on what happens to farm yields. ARP is a county level product. So, it makes payments …

UofI Alum Propst Elected IPPA President

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UofI Alum Propst Elected IPPA President
Jason Propst, Hog Producer & President IPPA - Neoga, IllinoisA University of Illinois Animal Sciences alum has been elected president of the Illinois Pork Producers Association.

New Fertility Products for the Hog Industry

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New Fertility Products for the Hog Industry
Rob Knox, Extension Swine Specialist - University of Illinois Farmers raising pigs around the planet are always looking for ways to improve the productivity of their breeding herds. They have long used artificial insemination to increase fertility and improve genetics. Todd Gleason has more on the latest technologies in this area.3:25 radio
3:50 radio self-containedIf, like me, you visit with livestock producers very often you’ll soon land on the topic of the breeding herd. More likely than not the discussion will involve some novel approaches to increasing fertility. For instance I once covered some research that involved garage door openers. Turns out that if you can track how often a heifer is being mounted by its lot companions - other heifers - then you can better time when to put the bull in the pen. Just put the garage door opener on the heifers back and set up a computer to track how often and when it is clicked. That’s …

Online Financial Planning Webinar & Course

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Online Financial Planning Webinar & Course
Kathy Sweedler, Extension Consumer Economics - University of IllinoisThere are two financial planning resources young people can access online from the University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environmental Sciences. The first is a one-hour long webinar. The second a four-week course. Both are free of charge, although for a small fee a certificate can be earned from the course work.

Don't Wait Until You're Stressed to Open a Savings Account

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Don’t Wait Until You’re Stressed to Open a Savings Account
Kathy Sweedler, Extension Consumer Economics - University of IllinoisThe time to start a savings account is today. Choosing to start saving when you are already under financial stress simply does not work.

Corn Consumption Update

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Corn Consumption Update
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisA University of Illinois agricultural economist has been thinking about the supply and demand for corn in the United States and elsewhere. Todd Gleason files this update on how fast the big crop harvested last fall is being used.U.S. farmers harvested more than…
2:50 radio
3:01 radio self-contained U.S. farmers harvested more than fifteen billion bushels of corn last fall. That’s a very, very big crop. It is expected there will be more than the usual amount leftover from it by the time the next crop comes in. Todd Hubbs has been thinking a lot about that and how the corn crop is used. He says exports have been strong. Factually 69% of what USDA thinks will be shipped out, has either been shipped or booked, already. And, we’re not even half-way into the marketing year. Hubbs :28 …it is a wait-and-see scenario in my mind.Quote Summary - So, meeting that 2.25 billion bushels USDA projected for…

Assessing Argentina Soybean Yield Risks | an interview with Todd Hubbs

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Assessing Argentina Soybean Yield Risks | an interview with Todd Hubbs
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois



by Todd Hubbs, Scott Irwin, and Darrel Good
source article

We recently began a series of articles to evaluate the history of corn and soybean yields and deviations from trend yield in Brazil and Argentina. The objective of the yield analysis is to provide a basis for forming expectations about the likely yields of the 2017 crops. The first six articles focused on the alternative sources of historical yield estimates, the selection of the appropriate series to use in the analysis for both corn and soybeans, the selection of the best-fitting trend model for each commodity and country, trend yield deviations in each country for corn, and trend yield deviations in Brazil for soybeans (farmdoc daily, November 2, 2016; November 9, 2016; November 16, 2016; December 14, 2016; December 15, 2016; and January 12, 2016). Today’s article examines soybean yi…

Iowa Court Decision on Field Tiles | an interview with Jonathan Coppess

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Iowa Court Decision on Field Tiles | an interview with Jonathan Coppess
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of IllinoisThe Iowa Supreme Court has ruled drainage districts in the state cannot be sued for the cleanup of nitrates in drinking water. Justice Thomas Waterman authored the majority opinion, writing that policy deciding who pays for nitrate removal is the jurisdiction of Iowa lawmakers. This was a win for the drainage districts says University of Illinois Agricultural Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess. However, he says the Clean Water Act implications of the suit, about whether or not field tiles are point sources that can be regulated, remains to be addressed.“So the big question under the Clean Water Act, as I understand it, is the Des Moines Water Works is claiming that the agricultural stormwater exemption under the Clean Water Act does not apply to drainage districts. In this case, because once it comes through the pipes it becomes …