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Showing posts from September, 2017

Field & Combine Fire Prevention

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Field & Combine Fire Prevention
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionThe latest drought monitor from the United States government shows dry conditions worsening in Illinois. Todd Gleason has more on the steps farmers can take to prevent field and combine fires this fall. 5:02
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Fall Garden Mums in the Garden

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Fall Garden Mums in the Garden
Kari Houle, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog postIt’s easy to buy potted mums in the fall, but did you know you can put them right into the ground. Next year they’ll come back. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois…

Planting Trees in the Fall

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Planting Trees in the Fall
Beth Allhands, University of Illinois ExtensionWith a few exceptions fall is the best time to plant trees. Todd Gleason has more on the reasons why and some how-to advice from the University of Illinois.

Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years

If you’re on Medicare and happen to have an unusually high taxable income year it will raise your premiums, but not right away. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois Tax School. Two years after a big income year the Federal government takes some of that money back by increasing Medicare premiums says Bob Rhea (ray), a presenter for the U of I Tax School.Quote Summary - For people who are drawing Medicare and paying Medicare premiums the IRS has a rule that says if you have a large income in one year, we wait two years and then look back and determine if you need to pay a higher Medicare premium because you had high income two years prior. Rhea says a typical Medicare Part B and Part D prescription drug plan runs about $150 per month or about $3,600 per year for a married couple. He says it is possible for that to balloon to as much as $12,000 for a single year event because of the sale of a business or other asset. Quote Summary - And we don’t find that out until two y…

Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years

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Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years
Bob Rhea, University of Illinois Tax School Lecturer | FBFMIf you’re on Medicare and happen to have an unusually high taxable income year it will raise your premiums, but not right away. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois Tax School. Two years after a big income year the Federal…
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1:17 radio self-contained Two years after a big income year the Federal government takes some of that money back by increasing Medicare premiums says Bob Rhea (ray), a presenter for the U of I Tax School.Rhea :20 …had high income two years prior. Quote Summary - For people who are drawing Medicare and paying Medicare premiums the IRS has a rule that says if you have a large income in one year, we wait two years and then look back and determine if you need to pay a higher Medicare premium because you had high income two years prior. Rhea says a typical Medicare Part B and Part D prescription drug plan runs about $1…

Big Income Years Impact Medicare Premiums 2 years Out

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Big Income Years Impact Medicare Premiums 2 years Out
Bob Rhea, University of Illinois Tax School Lecturer | FBFMFarmers, business owners, and others on Medicare might find a bigger bill in the mail than expected. Todd Gleason has more on how big income years produce big Medicare premiums two years later.

Growmark Introduces Simulator to Train Drivers

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Growmark Introduces Simulator to Train Drivers
Erik Wilcox, Equipment Manager - GrowmarkWe often hear about pilots using simulators to train before they actually fly. As of this year Growmark FS is using a simulator to train its sprayer operators. Todd Gleason has more. This month the company invited reporters to its…
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1:40 tv cgThis month the company invited reporters to its training center in Bloomington, Illinois and after a brief introduction invited them to take a spin in their brand new RoGator. Not a real one, but a simulator that seems pretty darned real even, says Growmark Equipment Manager Erik Wilcox, to those that drive the sprayer for a living. Wilcox :18 …we are headed in the right direction.Quote Summary - I’ve had a lot of doubting Thomases come in and say, “this is just a video game and not anything worthwhile” and with each and every one of them I challenge them to just get on and give me the feedback. Every on…

$45 Million for Photosynthesis Research

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$45 Million for Photosynthesis Research
(R) IL 13th, Representative Rodney Davis - United States CongressLast Friday (week / Sep 15, 2017), as Todd Gleason reports, political and agricultural leaders gathered on the University of Illinois campus to see transformative work by scientists in photo-synthetic efficiency. Actually it’s a project called R.I.P.E (ripe)….
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2:02 tv cgActually it’s a project called R.I.P.E.. That stands for Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency. It is a $45 million, five-year reinvestment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), and the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID). Illinois Congressman Rodney Davis, a member of the House of Representatives ag committee toured there research facilities, fields, and labs. He says he was impressed (tv skip to soundbite #2).Davis :41 …on less land to feed more people years fro…

Reducing Regs Would Benefit Low-Income Households & Farmers

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Reducing Regs Would Benefit Low-Income Households & Farmers
Craig Gundersen, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe Senate Ag Committee Thursday (today/yesterday) held a hearing on USDA’s food and nutrition programs and how they relate to the farm bill. On that subject, Todd Gleason reports, a University of Illinois agricultural economist thinks the divide between farmers and those using SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program sometimes called food stamps, should probably close ranks around a couple of issues, including governmental regulations.1:39 radio
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TV VOICERThe U of I’s Craig Gundersen says there’s plenty of common ground for farmers and low-income households to plow and it all involves back pocket issues. Gundersen :35 …would have a huge benefit for low-income households.Quote Summary - One of the keys ways that we can eliminate food security in the United States is to make sure food prices are low. Low food pr…