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Showing posts from June, 2017

Food Deserts, Amazon Prime, & SNAP

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Food Deserts, Amazon Prime, & SNAP
Craig Gundersen, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
Amazon Prime EBT PageThere is a new twist for USDA’s food and feeding programs. Part of 2014 Farm Bill is piloting ten new delivery systems that will allow people using the SNAP program to order food online for home delivery. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Craig Gundersen says when you look deeper this program can do a lot to help those who cannot always help themselves or that simply don’t have easy access to a grocery store. He says this is because there are food deserts in the United States.Gundersen 1:21 …through some of these home delivery programs.
audio & video clips availableThe Amazon Prime program is already in place for EBT card holders. EBT stands for Electronic Benefits Transfer. The discounted Amazon Prime membership, $5.99 per month rather than $10.99, cannot be purchased with the card. Food is available to those using USDA’s SNAP, WIC, …

USDA’s June 30 Grain Stocks Report for Corn

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USDA’s June 30 Grain Stocks Report for Corn
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Friday the United States Department of Agriculture will estimate how much corn is left in the country. This amount will need to sustain the nation through the fall harvest. Todd Gleason has more on the Grain Stocks report. The Grain Stocks report is released once a quarter…
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3:43 radio self-contained The Grain Stocks report is released once a quarter by USDA. It is made up of two parts. The first is a survey, nearly a census, of the number of bushels - in this case of corn - a grain elevator, terminal, or other type of certified storage facility has in possession. These are tallied as off farm bushels. The other part is more of a guesstimate of how many on farm bushels are in storage. When combined these two surveys provide a picture of how many bushels are available in the United States, the available supply. The market keeps track of this, too. When the repo…

Wood Chip Bioreactor Controls Tile Line Nitrate Load

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Wood Chip Bioreactor Controls Tile Line Nitrate Load
Laura Christianson, Crop Sciences - University of IllinoisThe Dudley Smith farm in Illinois is tiled and wired. Todd Gleason has more on how the University of Illinois is doing nitrogen loss research near Pana. Farmers gathered this week for a peek…
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1:45 tv cgFarmers gathered this week for a peek at the nitrogen loss control methods installed in Christian County. It’s a farm that rolls just a bit, but is pretty typical for the area other than the pastures on a portion of it. They came to hear from Laura Christianson. She’s a University of Illinois Crop Scientist.Christianson :27 …nitrate is taken out of the drainage water. Quote Summary - At the Dudley Smith farm we have a wood chip bioreactor installed. A wood chip bioreactor is a little mini water treatment plant to clean nitrate out of tile drainage. The thing that makes the Dudley Smith bioreactor different is that is has…

What Makes a Top Third Farm

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What Makes a Top Third Farm
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThere are just two items that make the difference between a top third farm and an average farm. Todd Gleason has more…This University of Illinois study was…
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1:38 radio self-containedThis University of Illinois study was on a small set in Mclean County. This was done to limit the influences of weather and a few other factors. Gary Schnitkey says he wanted to know why some farms made more than others. Turns out, the answer is pretty simple.Schnitkey :22 …machinery depreciation and interest cost.Quote Summary - What we found were distinct cost differences between the two groups. This was a $45 per acre difference between the average group and the high return group. The $45 came primarily in two items; machinery depreciation and interest cost.The more profitable farms tended to have lower machinery and non-land interest cost. The two are related says the University of Illinoi…

Feeding Wheat CoProducts to Pigs

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READER
Feeding Wheat CoProducts to Pigs
Hans Stein, Animal Scientist - University of Illinois Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the quality of protein in wheat middlings and red dog. Both are co-products of the wheat milling process. Each can be fed to pigs and other livestock.There is information about the digestibility of crude protein in some wheat co-products produced in Canada and China, says University of Illinois Animal Scientist Hans Stein, but only very limited information about the nutritional value of wheat middlings and red dog produced in the United States.Stein and U of I researcher Gloria Casas fed wheat middlings from 8 different states and red dog from Iowa to growing pigs. Despite the variety in the wheat middlings sources the concentration of crude protein were generally consistent. However, they did find some variation in the digestibility of the amino acids.The red dog contained slightly less crude protein than wheat mid…

Check Dicamba Soybeans After Spraying

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Check Dicamba Soybeans After Spraying
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois Farmers are turning to an old technology this year to control weeds in their fields. Todd Gleason has more on what they can expect from a new, old-product.Dicamba has been around for about half-a-century…
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1:36 tv cg Dicamba has been around for about half-a-century. It is a corn herbicide, but soybeans have been modified to tolerate it. This was done because so many weeds have modified themselves to resist being killed by glyphosate, commonly known as Round-Up. The primary problem, says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager, is waterhemp. Hager :11 ….but it is not excellent. It is not as consistent. Quote Summary - Dicamba, in the 50 years that we’ve used it, has never been excellent on any of the pigweed species. It can be good. It can be very good, but it is not excellent. It is not as consistent. This inc…

Hog Prices Continue to be Higher

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Hog Prices Continue to be Higher
Chris Hurt, Extension Agricultural Economist - Purdue University Despite more hogs coming to market this year, the price of pork remains higher. Todd Gleason has more on some of the reasons why. For agricultural commodities, larger supplies generally…
2:07 radio 2:12 radio self-containedQuote Summary - For agricultural commodities, larger supplies generally result in lower prices. This year’s hog market is going against that adage with both larger supplies and higher prices. Purdue University Extension Agricultural Economist Christ Hurt says this is because demand is really good.Hurt :25 …twenty-two percent of our domestic production.Quote Summary - The most important reason for higher prices involves favorable international trade for U.S. pork. Pork exports have been up 17 percent and pork imports have been down 10 percent. For trade data available so far this year, pork exports have accounted for 22 percent of our domestic production.Thi…

Crop Progress Reports & End of Season Yields

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Crop Progress Reports & End of Season Yields
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read blog postLast week USDA released its first national corn condition rating of the season. The crop, as you’ll hear, wasn’t in great shape. While it doesn’t mean much at this time of year, Todd Gleason reports there is a relationship between the first crop condition rating and the end of the season yield. The weekly Crop Progress report is mostly…
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2:22 tv cg The weekly Crop Progress report is mostly the work of Extension and FSA employees, at the least the data collection part. They report local crop conditions to state USDA offices, mostly on Monday morning, who in-turn tally those numbers and pass them along to Washington, D.C. for compilation and release on Monday afternoon. Work at the University of Illinois shows a strong relationship between the end-of-season crop condition ratings and crop yield, however, agric…

Master Gardeners Bloom through Training

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Master Gardeners Bloom through Training
Kelly Allsup, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of Illinois
read blog postMasters Gardeners spend time in the community giving back in wondrous ways. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Kelly Allsup about the volunteer program, its great success, and heartfelt giving.

Dealing with Wind Damaged Trees

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Dealing with Wind Damaged Trees
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture Specialist - University of Illinois
read blog postHigh winds can take a toll on trees. Assessing the damage and setting about clean up is an important task for the future health of the tree and the landscape surrounding it. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension Horticulture Specialist Chris Enroth about what to do.

Another Rough Income Year for Grain Farmers

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Another Rough Income Year for Grain Farmers
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois It looks like 2017 will be another rough year for grain farmers in the United States. Todd Gleason has more on the projected incomes.Even in Illinois, where the trend line yield for corn is 200…
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2:14 Even in Illinois, where the trend line yield for corn is 200 bushels to the acre and 61 for soybeans, the average income on a 1500 acre grain for this year is just $25,000. That’s not good says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey.Schnitkey :24 …if these projections hold.Quote Summary - That $25,000 isn’t enough to cover all the family living withdrawals and capital purchase expenses needed for a family farm of this size. Seventy to eighty-thousand dollars is needed to be sustainable in the long run. So, we are looking, again, at some financial deterioration if these projections hold. It is a projection that wasn’t quite so low earlier in th…