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Showing posts from April, 2017

Autism Resources at the University of Illinois

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Autism Resources at the University of Illinois
Susan Sloop, Extension Family Life Educator - University of IllinoisLearn more about autism and the resources available at the University of Illinois with U of I Extension’s Susan Sloop.theautismprogram.org

How to Make a Compost Pile | with Duane Friend

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How to Make a Compost Pile | with Duane Friend
Duane Friend, Extension Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois Composting can be a great way to eliminate yard and garden waste along with some table scraps. It is easy to create a home compost pile.directions on the web

Evaluating Barley Yellow Dwarf Resistance in Oats

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Evaluating Barley Yellow Dwarf Resistance in Oats
Fred Kolb, Crop Scientist - University of Illinois Doing research on crops can be tedious. It also ensures diseases and pests won’t over take them. Todd Gleason has more…Fred Kolb heads up the small grains breeding…
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1:23 tv cgFred Kolb heads up the small grains breeding program at the University of Illinois. He and his crew were out working on the south farms last week (Wednesday, April 18). They swing specialized tubes to deliver a little corn meal and an Aphid that carries Barley Yellow Dwarf disease. The aphid, says Kolb, infects the oats.Kolb :43 …several in the U.S. and several in Canada.Quote Summary - We are inoculating these oats with Barley Yellow Dwarf virus. And in order to that we rear aphids in the greenhouse, the aphids carry the virus, and then we put the aphids on the hills, and they infect the plants with the virus. We can then evaluate all these different genot…

Cattle | Increase Conception Rates after Lush Spring Turnout

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Cattle | Increase Conception Rates after Lush Spring Turnout
Travis Meteer, Extension Beef Educator - University of Illinois
Dan Shike, Animal Scientist - University of Illinois

During the winter most cattle are supplemented with dry forages, grains, and co-products. This ration is balanced and delivered to cattle. Then spring comes along and cattle are put out to grass. While green grass solves a lot of problems associated with winter feeding (manure, pen maintenance, calf health, and labor demands), it can, as Todd Gleason reports, pose nutritional challenges especially for newly bred cows.

That lush green grass forage has three major…
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That lush green grass forage has three major challenges when it comes to meeting cattle nutrition requirements.
it can lack enough dry matterit is high in protein, but the excess can become a problem without the dry matterand it is low in fiber The beef cattle specialists at the Universit…

Choosing Nitrogen Rates

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Choosing Nitrogen Rates
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of Illinois
read blog post The growing season has started and most corn farmers have already applied nitrogen. It is a very expensive plant food and, as Todd Gleason reports, getting the rate right may mean using a little less.Here’s how the University of Illinois nitrogen…
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2:08 radio self-containedHere’s how the University of Illinois nitrogen recommendation used to work. It was formula equal to roughly one-point-two times the expected yield minus the nitrogen leftover from the previous crop. That “yield-goal-based system” recommends too much for today’s corn hybrids says University of Illinois Extension Agronomist Emerson Nafziger.Nafziger :13 …up more than requirements for nitrogen have gone up.Quote Summary - That yield-goal-based system flat-out doesn’t work anymore. The reason it doesn’t is that our yields have gone up a lot, and we are clearly showing that yields have gone up more…

Working to Create New Illini Brand Soybean Varieties

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Working to Create New Illini Brand Soybean Varieties Troy Cary, Crop Sciences - University of Illinois Lauran Widman, ACES Graduate Student - University of IllinoisTroy Cary & Lauran Widman (wihd-man) are working to create twelve-thousand 2017 University of Illinois soybean breeding program plots. Todd Gleason caught up with them on Tuesday morning and put together this look at some of the pre-planting season work.They started out as individually selected…
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Troy Cary, Crop Sciences
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Lauran Widman, ACES Graduate Student University of Illinois–YouTube Link

How to Boil, Color, and use Easter Eggs

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How to Boil, Color, and use Easter Eggs
Mary Liz Wright, Extension Nutrition & Wellness - University of Illinois
read blog postIf you haven’t made Easter Eggs for the weekend, you’re in luck. There is still time and Todd Gleason has the how-to details with University of Illinois Extension’s Mary Liz Wright.

Dicamba Soybeans | how to manage herbicide applications

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Dicamba Soybeans | how to manage herbicide applications
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois

read more from Aaron Hager, University of Illinois Extension

Farmers going to the field this spring will be using a brand new type of soybean. Todd Gleason has more on why dicamba-resistant varieties will require them to exercise caution when making herbicide applications.

Dicamba is a very old herbicide…
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Dicamba is a very old herbicide. It has been in use for more than four decades. It kills broadleaf plants and one of the most sensitive of these says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has long been the soybean.
Hager :13 …trying to look at how soybean are.
Quotes Summary - It is one of the most sensitive broadleaf species that is grown in Illinois. You can look in the literature and find studies that have been done now for forty or fifty years really trying to look at how soybean are. Recent wor…

Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Sting Like a Bee

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Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Sting Like a Bee
Jason Haupt, Energy & Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois
read blog spotPollinators play a significant role in keeping habitats healthy and diverse. They are important to agriculture pollinating crops and help in ensuring a good healthy yield. When most people think of pollinators, their first thought is honeybees. However, there are so many more bees than just honey- bees (which are non-native) and more than 3,500 species of native bees in the United States with 228 of them found in Illinois. Without bees, much of the produce that you love to have in the summer would not be available in the quantities or the quality that you love. Peppers, tomatoes, many root vegetables, and many fruits need bees to pollinate and produce healthy produce. Bees ensure that the flowers properly pollinate and produce healthy and abundant fruits, seeds, and vegetables. Research has also shown that an increased na…

Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Float Like a Butterfly

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Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Float Like a Butterfly
Jason Haupt, Energy & Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois
read blog spotWhen you are looking to attract butterflies and other pollinators to your yard, you need to think about providing for all stages in the life of the insects that you want to attract. Insects have multiple life stages, and each stage has a different food requirement. Milkweed is one of the most common plants chosen to attract butterflies, Monarchs specifically, but Milkweed only provides for one of the life stages of the Monarch’s life cycle. To attract and keep the butterflies coming to your yard, you need to provide food for the larval stage (caterpillar), the pupa (chrysalis), and the adult (butterfly) stages. Each stage has specific requirements.

Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Feathered Friends

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Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Feathered Friends
Jason Haupt, Energy & Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois
read blog spotAttracting wildlife to your yard is something in which everyone seems to be interested. But knowing how to do this is what many people lack. As you think about attracting wildlife to your yard, the first step is to start looking at your yard as a habitat. All habitats have four elements: water, shelter, food, and space.