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Showing posts from March, 2017

Corn & Soybean Planting Date Recommendations

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Corn & Soybean Planting Date Recommendations
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of Illinois Coming up, we’ll hear some planting date recommendations from Emerson Nafziger. Todd Gleason reports the University of Illinois agronomist is surprised by the consistency between corn and soybeans. The University of Illinois has conducted planting date…
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2:40 radio self-containedThe University of Illinois has conducted planting date studies for decades. Emerson Nafziger smiles to himself when he says he’s been here for more than a couple of them. It’s the last 10 years he says that has really changed things.Nafziger :28 …as it probably was twenty or thirty years ago.The big surprise we are finding is that corn and soybean responses are so similar. What I think has happened with genetic improvement in both crops is that they have both become more stress tolerant and resilient. Consequently, late planting is not quite so damaging to yield potential as i…

Are Native Plants Better than Non-Native

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Are Native Plants Better than Non-Native
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog articleThe time of year has come to think about what plants you’d like to put in your yard and garden. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Chris Enroth about how he decides what to plant, and… what to constrain.

Are Cooking Oils Interchangeable

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Are Cooking Oils Interchangeable
Jenna Smith, Extension Nutrition & Wellness, University of Illinois
read blog articleAs you read a recipe, you see it calls for canola oil, but all you have is olive oil. Do you reach for the canola or put on your shoes and head to the store? Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Jenna Smith about the interchangeability of cooking oils.

The American Robin: Living up to its Superhero Image

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The American Robin: Living up to its Superhero Image
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of Illinois

by Chris Enroth, University of Illinois Extension

After an exceptionally mild winter, I noted my first robin sighting about three weeks ago. During that initial observation, scores of robins had arrived in my yard. Spring is a time of year when the migratory American robin can be found scouring the earth in search of protein. Sipping on my coffee, wave after wave of robins hopped through the yard, stopping to cock their head, as if listening for worms in the soil below. Scratching and digging through my leaf mulch, these red-breasted thrushes, found quite a feast.




Our American Robin suffers from an unfortunate Latin/scientific name coincidence- Turdus migratorius. Thumbing through various literature, ornithologists with an impeccably matter-of-fact tone describe the origin of Turdus as Latin for “thrush.”

Though my first sighting of a r…

On the Value of Ethanol in the Gasoline Blend

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On the Value of Ethanol in the Gasoline Blend
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisRead farmdocDaily ArticleThere has been much debate and much written about the likely costs and benefits of including ethanol in the domestic gasoline supply. Costs and benefits fall into two major categories–environmental and economic (e.g., Stock, 2015). One economic consideration is the potential impact on domestic gasoline prices from augmenting the gasoline supply with biofuels. A second economic consideration, and one that has received the most attention, is the cost of ethanol relative to petroleum-based fuel. What has been missing from the analysis of the value of ethanol in the gasoline blend is an estimate of the net value of ethanol based on: i) an energy penalty relative to gasoline; and ii) an octane premium based on the lower price of ethanol relative to petroleum sources of octane. This farmdocDaily article provides an analysis of that net value since J…

Spring Lawn Care | How to Sow Grass Seed

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Spring Lawn Care | How to Sow Grass Seed
John Fulton, Extension County Director - University of IllinoisIf you live in central Illinois you have a choice to make today. You can either decide to control the crabgrass in your lawn, or you can try to fix the dead or thin areas. Todd Gleason has more on the how-to..Spring is about a month earlier than usual this year…
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2:18 radio self-containedSpring is about a month earlier than usual this year across a large part of the eastern United States. It definitely means now is the time to start doing some pre-season lawn care says University of Illinois Extension’s John Fulton. He’s in central Illinois where the time has come to control crabgrass or sow seed. He says you can’t do both, at least not in the same spot. Fulton :16 …kill your germinating grass seeds. Quote Summary - You want to either seed new grass or control crabgrass. You can’t do both in the same season. That’s number one because the same products that wil…

Spring Lawn Maintenance and Seeding

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Spring Lawn Maintenance and Seeding
John Fulton, Extension County Director - University of Illinoislink to blog articleby John Fulton, University of Illinois ExtensionHere we are in the first half of March, and the forsythia is in bloom. This marks the beginning of the crabgrass germination. It is an entire month early, when compared to average. Applications of crabgrass preventers are usually repeated in four to six weeks, but two repeated applications may be suggested this year due to the very early season.Use of a crabgrass preventer is very effective, and the most common way to attack the problem. There are a few products out there, and they are often combined with fertilizer. They all basically kill small seeds as they germinate. They will also do the same with grass seed you have sown, so the two operations do not work together. If you sow seed, you live with the crabgrass for the year. Timing is critical for crabgrass control, and we may have already missed the fir…

Nutrition and Kidney Stones

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Nutrition and Kidney Stones
Lisa Peterson, Nutrition and Wellness Educator - University of Illinois Extension see blog postIt’s National Kidney month. Up next University of Illinois Extension’s Todd Gleason has some ways to avoid kidney stones. About a half a million Americans will go…
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3:04 radio self-containedAbout a half a million Americans will go to the emergency room this year doubled over in pain only to find out there’s not much to do except wait for the kidney stone to pass. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, kidney stones are hard, pebble-like, mineral deposits that form in one or both kidneys. Stones vary in size, shape, and composition. Some kidney stones are as small as a grain of sand, or as large as a pea. Kidney stones form when urine becomes highly concentrated allowing minerals to stick together forming the stones. Because of the variation in size and shape of stones, some kidney stones move throug…