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Showing posts from February, 2017

Global Trade of Agricultural Commodities Expected to Grow

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Global Trade of Agricultural Commodities Expected to Grow
Robert Johannson, Chief Economist - United States Department of AgricultureChina purchases two-thirds of the soybeans traded on the planet. Todd Gleason has more on this and other markets for U.S. crops. Over the next ten years, USDA expects global soybean…
1:40 radio
1:47 radio self-contained Over the next ten years, USDA expects global soybean trade to increase by 25% and that Chinese purchases will account for 85% of the increase. The numbers were presented at the Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington D.C., (today, Thursday, Feb 23, 2017) by USDA Chief Economist Rob Johannson. He says the projections are based on the assumption the number of middle-class households in China will double to nearly 250 million by the year 2024. Johannson :14 …India is expected to triple by 2024.Quote Summary - Those households will start demanding more meat, protein, and processed foods in their diet. And looking to other potent…

February Application of NH3 O.K.

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VOICER
February Application of NH3 O.K.
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of IllinoisThe warm weather in the Midwest has farmers itching to go to the field to get some pre-season work done. University of Illinois Extension Agronomist Emerson Nafziger says it is ok to apply anhydrous ammonia to corn acres.Nafziger :16 …that’s the most important thing. Quote Summary - It is o.k. to do it. I would liken it more to a fall application than a spring application. The good news is soil conditions are pretty good right now because we haven’t had much rain (across the state) in February. That’s the most important thing. Again, Nafziger says as long as soil conditions are good, a late winter anhydrous ammonia application should work just like a fall application.

Casting a Data Science Company | an interview with Robb Fraley

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Casting a Data Science Company | an interview with Robb Fraley
Robb Fraley, Chief Technology Officer - MonsantoMonsanto used to be a chemical company that made herbicides. It then transitioned to a genetic-traits company that produced seeds. Now, as it is set to merge with Bayer, the Chief Technology Officer for Monsanto looks to be casting the St. Louis based agricultural giant into the data-science world of Apple and Samsung. Todd Gleason has this interview with Robb Fraley from the 2017 Illinois Soybean Summit in Peoria.

Stink Bugs Invading Illinois Homes

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Stink Bugs Invading Illinois Homes
Kelly Estes, Entomologist - PRI ISWS - University of Illinois A new kind of stink bug is making a big move in Illinois. Todd Gleason files this report on why people are finding the shield-shaped insect in their homes, and how the bugs may impact yards, gardens, and farms.

New Fertility Products for the Hog Industry

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New Fertility Products for the Hog Industry
Rob Knox, Extension Swine Specialist - University of Illinois Farmers raising pigs around the planet are always looking for ways to improve the productivity of their breeding herds. They have long used artificial insemination to increase fertility and improve genetics. Todd Gleason has more on the latest technologies in this area.3:25 radio
3:50 radio self-containedIf, like me, you visit with livestock producers very often you’ll soon land on the topic of the breeding herd. More likely than not the discussion will involve some novel approaches to increasing fertility. For instance I once covered some research that involved garage door openers. Turns out that if you can track how often a heifer is being mounted by its lot companions - other heifers - then you can better time when to put the bull in the pen. Just put the garage door opener on the heifers back and set up a computer to track how often and when it is clicked. That’s …

Don't Wait Until You're Stressed to Open a Savings Account

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Don’t Wait Until You’re Stressed to Open a Savings Account
Kathy Sweedler, Extension Consumer Economics - University of IllinoisThe time to start a savings account is today. Choosing to start saving when you are already under financial stress simply does not work.