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Showing posts from 2017

What Time Is It

What Time Is It
Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory
USNO Master Clock Voice Announcer
www.time.govTime through the ages has been adapted for many purposes. The Romans were known to change the calendar to keep a politician in office longer. Some calendars work off moon cycles, others don’t. Todd Gleason files this report on the Gregorian calendar and how it is used to tell time.USNO Master Clock Voice Announcer… 2:45Nat Sound: USNO Master Clock Voice Announcer Music: Up Full and UnderThis is the official voice of time in the United States. It is the U.S. Naval Observatory Master Clock Announcer, a voice many radio & television stations depend upon. The U.S. Naval Observatory’s written mission includes determining the positions and motions of the Earth, Sun, Moon, planets, stars and other celestial objects, providing astronomical data; determining precise time; measuring the Earth’s rotation; and maintaining the Master Clock for the United States. The U.S. works off the Gr…

Turkey Facts (self contained for Thanksgiving Day)

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Turkey Facts (self contained for Thanksgiving Day)
http://urbanext.illinois.edu/turkey/Running Time – 2:02For University of Illinois Extension I’m Todd Gleason. Happy Thanksgiving. Here’s a list of turkey facts, you might find of interest.Ben Franklin, in a letter to his daughter, proposed the turkey as the official United States bird.In 2012, the average American ate 16 pounds of turkey.The heaviest turkey ever raised was 86 pounds, about the size of a large dog.A 15 pound turkey usually has about 70 percent white meat and 30 percent dark meat.The male turkey is called a tom.The female turkey is called a hen.The turkey was domesticated in Mexico and brought to Europe in the 16th century.Wild turkeys can fly for short distances up to 55 miles per hour.Wild turkeys can run 20 miles per hour.Turkeys’ heads change colors when they become excited.Most of the turkeys raised for commercial production are White Hollands.It takes 75–80 pounds of feed to raise a 30 pound tom turkey…

Using the Productivity Index to Figure Cash Rents

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Using the Productivity Index to Figure Cash Rents
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Right now farmers are in the middle of negotiating 2018 cash rents. This while their incomes have been depressed for four years. Todd Gleason reports Agricultural economist Gary Schnitkey has been working up a way for landowners and their tenants to feel better about bringing cash rents down. The University of Illinois number cruncher has…
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2:00 radio self-containedThe University of Illinois number cruncher has developed a formula to derive cash rent from a fields P.I.. That’s the Productivity Index. It is benchmarked, in a fashion, to USDA’s Cash Rents Survey and uses a geographic adjustment tied to the CRD, that’s USDA’s Crop Reporting District. This allows for demand patterns in an area to show up in the formula. Schnitkey, in a farmdocDaily article says the P.I. and CRD adjustment explains 91% of the variability in the average cash rents as repor…

A Better Choice | Common Milkweed for Monarch Butterflies

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A Better Choice | Common Milkweed for Monarch Butterflies
Jason Haupt, Extension Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinoisby Jason Haupt
Friday November 3, 2017We have been hearing about how Monarch Butterflies are in trouble. The question is “what to do to help the Monarch’s?” The common answer has been to plant more milkweed, but is this the best advice to give? Is the answer to the Monarch question much more complicated than just planting more milkweed?Monarch Butterflies are amazing creatures. I cannot think of any other creature that begins a journey in one place and finds its way to a place that it has never been. Monarchs, from much of North America, spend the winter months in the highlands in southern Mexico. They make this journey from the northern part of North America, flying all the way down to Mexico.The conservation of Monarch Butterflies is a complicated question. One of the biggest influences on populations has been the loss of habitat, which is w…

Calculating N-Rates for Corn | with Emerson Nafziger

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Calculating N-Rates for Corn | with Emerson Nafziger
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois Agronomist Emerson Nafziger says deep prairie soils can provide up to one-hundred-pounds of N annually. This makes nitrogen fertilizer applications less limiting than once thought. Todd Gleason talks with Nafziger about how farmers should calculate anhydrous ammonia rates this fall.17:32 soq

Avoiding Field & Combine Fires

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Avoiding Field & Combine Fires
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionWe’ve been hearing about range and brush fires out west all year long. Now, the threat has come to the corn belt. Todd Gleason has more on how farmers can work to avoid combine and field fires this harvest season. 2:15 radio
2:24 radio self-contained Dry conditions from the Dakota’s to Illinois should keep farmers wary of accidentally starting a fire. It’s not something that aren’t used to thinking about each harvest, but one to take special note of this season says Duane Friend from the University of Illinois.Friend :37 …and you can end up with a field fire.Quote Summary - And it is one of those things where you may have a combine or a truck out in the field and field fires don’t always just start immediately. Sometimes they can start from plant materials which have been smoldering for 15 to 30 minutes. So, if somebody is driving a vehicle with a hot exhaust pipe through a field and it comes…

Dealing with Fall Drought in the Home Landscape

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Dealing with Fall Drought in the Home Landscape
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture - University of IllinoisIt appears the dry weather is going to last through the fall. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois on how to care for your yard and landscape.

Field & Combine Fire Prevention

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Field & Combine Fire Prevention
Duane Friend, University of Illinois ExtensionThe latest drought monitor from the United States government shows dry conditions worsening in Illinois. Todd Gleason has more on the steps farmers can take to prevent field and combine fires this fall. 5:02
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Fall Garden Mums in the Garden

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Fall Garden Mums in the Garden
Kari Houle, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog postIt’s easy to buy potted mums in the fall, but did you know you can put them right into the ground. Next year they’ll come back. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois…

Planting Trees in the Fall

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Planting Trees in the Fall
Beth Allhands, University of Illinois ExtensionWith a few exceptions fall is the best time to plant trees. Todd Gleason has more on the reasons why and some how-to advice from the University of Illinois.

Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years

If you’re on Medicare and happen to have an unusually high taxable income year it will raise your premiums, but not right away. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois Tax School. Two years after a big income year the Federal government takes some of that money back by increasing Medicare premiums says Bob Rhea (ray), a presenter for the U of I Tax School.Quote Summary - For people who are drawing Medicare and paying Medicare premiums the IRS has a rule that says if you have a large income in one year, we wait two years and then look back and determine if you need to pay a higher Medicare premium because you had high income two years prior. Rhea says a typical Medicare Part B and Part D prescription drug plan runs about $150 per month or about $3,600 per year for a married couple. He says it is possible for that to balloon to as much as $12,000 for a single year event because of the sale of a business or other asset. Quote Summary - And we don’t find that out until two y…

Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years

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Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years
Bob Rhea, University of Illinois Tax School Lecturer | FBFMIf you’re on Medicare and happen to have an unusually high taxable income year it will raise your premiums, but not right away. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois Tax School. Two years after a big income year the Federal…
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1:17 radio self-contained Two years after a big income year the Federal government takes some of that money back by increasing Medicare premiums says Bob Rhea (ray), a presenter for the U of I Tax School.Rhea :20 …had high income two years prior. Quote Summary - For people who are drawing Medicare and paying Medicare premiums the IRS has a rule that says if you have a large income in one year, we wait two years and then look back and determine if you need to pay a higher Medicare premium because you had high income two years prior. Rhea says a typical Medicare Part B and Part D prescription drug plan runs about $1…

Big Income Years Impact Medicare Premiums 2 years Out

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Big Income Years Impact Medicare Premiums 2 years Out
Bob Rhea, University of Illinois Tax School Lecturer | FBFMFarmers, business owners, and others on Medicare might find a bigger bill in the mail than expected. Todd Gleason has more on how big income years produce big Medicare premiums two years later.

Growmark Introduces Simulator to Train Drivers

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Growmark Introduces Simulator to Train Drivers
Erik Wilcox, Equipment Manager - GrowmarkWe often hear about pilots using simulators to train before they actually fly. As of this year Growmark FS is using a simulator to train its sprayer operators. Todd Gleason has more. This month the company invited reporters to its…
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1:40 tv cgThis month the company invited reporters to its training center in Bloomington, Illinois and after a brief introduction invited them to take a spin in their brand new RoGator. Not a real one, but a simulator that seems pretty darned real even, says Growmark Equipment Manager Erik Wilcox, to those that drive the sprayer for a living. Wilcox :18 …we are headed in the right direction.Quote Summary - I’ve had a lot of doubting Thomases come in and say, “this is just a video game and not anything worthwhile” and with each and every one of them I challenge them to just get on and give me the feedback. Every on…

$45 Million for Photosynthesis Research

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$45 Million for Photosynthesis Research
(R) IL 13th, Representative Rodney Davis - United States CongressLast Friday (week / Sep 15, 2017), as Todd Gleason reports, political and agricultural leaders gathered on the University of Illinois campus to see transformative work by scientists in photo-synthetic efficiency. Actually it’s a project called R.I.P.E (ripe)….
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2:02 tv cgActually it’s a project called R.I.P.E.. That stands for Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency. It is a $45 million, five-year reinvestment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), and the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID). Illinois Congressman Rodney Davis, a member of the House of Representatives ag committee toured there research facilities, fields, and labs. He says he was impressed (tv skip to soundbite #2).Davis :41 …on less land to feed more people years fro…

Reducing Regs Would Benefit Low-Income Households & Farmers

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Reducing Regs Would Benefit Low-Income Households & Farmers
Craig Gundersen, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe Senate Ag Committee Thursday (today/yesterday) held a hearing on USDA’s food and nutrition programs and how they relate to the farm bill. On that subject, Todd Gleason reports, a University of Illinois agricultural economist thinks the divide between farmers and those using SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program sometimes called food stamps, should probably close ranks around a couple of issues, including governmental regulations.1:39 radio
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TV VOICERThe U of I’s Craig Gundersen says there’s plenty of common ground for farmers and low-income households to plow and it all involves back pocket issues. Gundersen :35 …would have a huge benefit for low-income households.Quote Summary - One of the keys ways that we can eliminate food security in the United States is to make sure food prices are low. Low food pr…

CME Group Provides Scholarships for Agriculture

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Agricultural companies are always on the hunt for good employees, but those with college educations can be hard to find. Todd Gleason reports from the Illinois State Fair that the world’s largest options and futures exchange is hoping to inspire a few more kids to further their education.
The CME Group, for the third year in a row…

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The CME Group, for the third year in a row at the Illinois State Fair, is providing the kids showing the Grand Champion animals $5000 scholarships for their education funds. This year says CME’s Tim Andriesen they’ve upped that ante a bit and will also provide nine $1000 scholarships. He says this is because agriculture will need a lot of really bright people to provide food for the planet.

Andriesen :18 …they are going to develop.

Quote Summary - The U.N. will tell you that there will be nine-billion people to feed in 2050. That is going to require a lot of growth in agriculture. It will r…

Google Makes $1.5 Million Gift to 4-H

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Google, through its philanthropic arm, has made a $1.5 million gift to 4-H across the nation. The company is providing both funding support and virtual reality equipment to 4-H youth computer science programs. It made the announcement at the Illinois State Fair Friday, August 11, 2017.

How USDA NASS Gathers Crop Production Report Data

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USDA NASS will release the first corn and soybean Crop Production Report of the season Thursday August 10th, 2017. Todd Gleason talks with USDA NASS State Statistician Mark Schleusener (shloy-seh-ner) about how the information is collected and calculated.

How to Control Aggressive Garden Plants

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Aggressive, invasive, and garden-thug are all terms commonly used by gardeners to describe those garden perennials that tend to overtake intended areas. It all starts with good intention. Usually a garden friend who wants to share a division of a plant they have an abundance of, or a gorgeous plant at the garden center whose label fails to note its aggressive growth habit.

Extrapolating Yields from USDA's Crop Conditions

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Extrapolating Yields from USDA’s Crop Conditions
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois It’s about this time of year that USDA’s Crop Condition reports can be used, in part, to develop corn and soybean yields. Todd Gleason has more on why that is the case and some projections. The agricultural economists at the University… 2:17 radio
2:26 radio self-contained The agricultural economists at the University of Illinois have been tweaking yields out of the USDA crop conditions reports for quite some time. They say the later in the season it gets the more accurate they become. Right about now is usually when the good to excellent ratings, along with all the rest, begin to zero in on what’s really happening across America says Darrel Good.Good :40 …correlation between final ratings and yields. We do know that the initial ratings for both crops are generally a bit on the high side. That is crops always look good early in the season before weather has had it…

Barley, Beer, Budweiser

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Barley, Beer, Budweiser
Alan Slater, Director Midwest Barley Operations - Anheuser Busch Jim Howe, Howe Seed Farms - Casselton, North DakotaWhen you reach for that ice cold Budweiser it has a lot farm country in it. Anheuser Busch celebrated its relationship with barley growers this month (July 19 & 20, 2017). Todd Gleason has more from a harvest table at Howe Seed Farms about twenty miles due west of Fargo, North Dakota.1:42 radio
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1:44 tv 2:00 tv cg The barley malt delivered to Anheuser Busch in St. Louis, Missouri comes from farmers way up north in the United States. It’s processed in Moorhead, Minnesota. Alan Slater is the Director of Midwest Barley Operations and he spent some time earlier this month letting folks know just how important the barley farmers, and it is pretty safe to say he knows a lot of them, are to making beer. Slater :22 ….rural communities and moving on to the end product.Quote Summary - We get to deliver this barley f…

Butterfly Weed | a milkweed for your yard & garden

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Butterfly Weed | a milkweed for your yard & garden
Candice Hart, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog postThe butterfly weed is a favorite of Candice Hart as a great cut flower, but also as a milkweed that supports the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly. Commonly known as butterfly weed, this long-lived and striking perennial is native to much of the continental United States, along with Canadian provinces Ontario and Quebec.

Food Deserts, Amazon Prime, & SNAP

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Food Deserts, Amazon Prime, & SNAP
Craig Gundersen, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
Amazon Prime EBT PageThere is a new twist for USDA’s food and feeding programs. Part of 2014 Farm Bill is piloting ten new delivery systems that will allow people using the SNAP program to order food online for home delivery. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Craig Gundersen says when you look deeper this program can do a lot to help those who cannot always help themselves or that simply don’t have easy access to a grocery store. He says this is because there are food deserts in the United States.Gundersen 1:21 …through some of these home delivery programs.
audio & video clips availableThe Amazon Prime program is already in place for EBT card holders. EBT stands for Electronic Benefits Transfer. The discounted Amazon Prime membership, $5.99 per month rather than $10.99, cannot be purchased with the card. Food is available to those using USDA’s SNAP, WIC, …

Wood Chip Bioreactor Controls Tile Line Nitrate Load

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Wood Chip Bioreactor Controls Tile Line Nitrate Load
Laura Christianson, Crop Sciences - University of IllinoisThe Dudley Smith farm in Illinois is tiled and wired. Todd Gleason has more on how the University of Illinois is doing nitrogen loss research near Pana. Farmers gathered this week for a peek…
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1:45 tv cgFarmers gathered this week for a peek at the nitrogen loss control methods installed in Christian County. It’s a farm that rolls just a bit, but is pretty typical for the area other than the pastures on a portion of it. They came to hear from Laura Christianson. She’s a University of Illinois Crop Scientist.Christianson :27 …nitrate is taken out of the drainage water. Quote Summary - At the Dudley Smith farm we have a wood chip bioreactor installed. A wood chip bioreactor is a little mini water treatment plant to clean nitrate out of tile drainage. The thing that makes the Dudley Smith bioreactor different is that is has…

What Makes a Top Third Farm

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What Makes a Top Third Farm
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThere are just two items that make the difference between a top third farm and an average farm. Todd Gleason has more…This University of Illinois study was…
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1:38 radio self-containedThis University of Illinois study was on a small set in Mclean County. This was done to limit the influences of weather and a few other factors. Gary Schnitkey says he wanted to know why some farms made more than others. Turns out, the answer is pretty simple.Schnitkey :22 …machinery depreciation and interest cost.Quote Summary - What we found were distinct cost differences between the two groups. This was a $45 per acre difference between the average group and the high return group. The $45 came primarily in two items; machinery depreciation and interest cost.The more profitable farms tended to have lower machinery and non-land interest cost. The two are related says the University of Illinoi…

Feeding Wheat CoProducts to Pigs

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Feeding Wheat CoProducts to Pigs
Hans Stein, Animal Scientist - University of Illinois Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the quality of protein in wheat middlings and red dog. Both are co-products of the wheat milling process. Each can be fed to pigs and other livestock.There is information about the digestibility of crude protein in some wheat co-products produced in Canada and China, says University of Illinois Animal Scientist Hans Stein, but only very limited information about the nutritional value of wheat middlings and red dog produced in the United States.Stein and U of I researcher Gloria Casas fed wheat middlings from 8 different states and red dog from Iowa to growing pigs. Despite the variety in the wheat middlings sources the concentration of crude protein were generally consistent. However, they did find some variation in the digestibility of the amino acids.The red dog contained slightly less crude protein than wheat mid…

Check Dicamba Soybeans After Spraying

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Check Dicamba Soybeans After Spraying
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois Farmers are turning to an old technology this year to control weeds in their fields. Todd Gleason has more on what they can expect from a new, old-product.Dicamba has been around for about half-a-century…
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1:36 tv cg Dicamba has been around for about half-a-century. It is a corn herbicide, but soybeans have been modified to tolerate it. This was done because so many weeds have modified themselves to resist being killed by glyphosate, commonly known as Round-Up. The primary problem, says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager, is waterhemp. Hager :11 ….but it is not excellent. It is not as consistent. Quote Summary - Dicamba, in the 50 years that we’ve used it, has never been excellent on any of the pigweed species. It can be good. It can be very good, but it is not excellent. It is not as consistent. This inc…

Master Gardeners Bloom through Training

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Master Gardeners Bloom through Training
Kelly Allsup, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of Illinois
read blog postMasters Gardeners spend time in the community giving back in wondrous ways. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Kelly Allsup about the volunteer program, its great success, and heartfelt giving.

Dealing with Wind Damaged Trees

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Dealing with Wind Damaged Trees
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture Specialist - University of Illinois
read blog postHigh winds can take a toll on trees. Assessing the damage and setting about clean up is an important task for the future health of the tree and the landscape surrounding it. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension Horticulture Specialist Chris Enroth about what to do.

Don’t Risk a Lot to Save a Little

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Don’t Risk a Lot to Save a Little
Karen Chan, University of Illinois Extension
read blog post“Don’t risk a lot to save a little”, that simple phrase has stuck with University of Illinois Extension’s Karen Chan through many years. All the way back she says to when she learned it while studying for her Certified Financial Planner designation. It is one of three basic principles of risk management. The idea is not to try saving a nickel when that decision might end up costing $10. Karen has a list of examples.

6 Ways to Age Successfully

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6 Ways to Age Successfully
Karla Belzer, Extension Family Life Educator - University of Illinois
read blog postStudies have shown there are six main characteristic to aging successfully:Maintaining a positive or optimistic attitude. People who are more positive and optimistic are more resilient due to their creative, flexible, and open ways of thinking about things. Surround yourself with positive, supportive people. Let go of worry and practice self-care by managing your stress, laughing, and practicing positive self-talk.Stay socially active. Get involved in a cause or interest, pursue a passion, and do something you enjoy each day. Being socially active will help you reduce stress and benefit your mental and physical well-being.Live with purpose. Looking beyond yourself through giving to others is a hallmark of people who live with purpose. Consider volunteering in your community and think of ways you can give back. Share a talent or skill with others. Work as a mentor …

Autism Resources at the University of Illinois

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Autism Resources at the University of Illinois
Susan Sloop, Extension Family Life Educator - University of IllinoisLearn more about autism and the resources available at the University of Illinois with U of I Extension’s Susan Sloop.theautismprogram.org

How to Make a Compost Pile | with Duane Friend

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How to Make a Compost Pile | with Duane Friend
Duane Friend, Extension Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois Composting can be a great way to eliminate yard and garden waste along with some table scraps. It is easy to create a home compost pile.directions on the web

Evaluating Barley Yellow Dwarf Resistance in Oats

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Evaluating Barley Yellow Dwarf Resistance in Oats
Fred Kolb, Crop Scientist - University of Illinois Doing research on crops can be tedious. It also ensures diseases and pests won’t over take them. Todd Gleason has more…Fred Kolb heads up the small grains breeding…
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1:23 tv cgFred Kolb heads up the small grains breeding program at the University of Illinois. He and his crew were out working on the south farms last week (Wednesday, April 18). They swing specialized tubes to deliver a little corn meal and an Aphid that carries Barley Yellow Dwarf disease. The aphid, says Kolb, infects the oats.Kolb :43 …several in the U.S. and several in Canada.Quote Summary - We are inoculating these oats with Barley Yellow Dwarf virus. And in order to that we rear aphids in the greenhouse, the aphids carry the virus, and then we put the aphids on the hills, and they infect the plants with the virus. We can then evaluate all these different genot…

Cattle | Increase Conception Rates after Lush Spring Turnout

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Cattle | Increase Conception Rates after Lush Spring Turnout
Travis Meteer, Extension Beef Educator - University of Illinois
Dan Shike, Animal Scientist - University of Illinois

During the winter most cattle are supplemented with dry forages, grains, and co-products. This ration is balanced and delivered to cattle. Then spring comes along and cattle are put out to grass. While green grass solves a lot of problems associated with winter feeding (manure, pen maintenance, calf health, and labor demands), it can, as Todd Gleason reports, pose nutritional challenges especially for newly bred cows.

That lush green grass forage has three major…
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That lush green grass forage has three major challenges when it comes to meeting cattle nutrition requirements.
it can lack enough dry matterit is high in protein, but the excess can become a problem without the dry matterand it is low in fiber The beef cattle specialists at the Universit…

Choosing Nitrogen Rates

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Choosing Nitrogen Rates
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of Illinois
read blog post The growing season has started and most corn farmers have already applied nitrogen. It is a very expensive plant food and, as Todd Gleason reports, getting the rate right may mean using a little less.Here’s how the University of Illinois nitrogen…
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2:08 radio self-containedHere’s how the University of Illinois nitrogen recommendation used to work. It was formula equal to roughly one-point-two times the expected yield minus the nitrogen leftover from the previous crop. That “yield-goal-based system” recommends too much for today’s corn hybrids says University of Illinois Extension Agronomist Emerson Nafziger.Nafziger :13 …up more than requirements for nitrogen have gone up.Quote Summary - That yield-goal-based system flat-out doesn’t work anymore. The reason it doesn’t is that our yields have gone up a lot, and we are clearly showing that yields have gone up more…

Working to Create New Illini Brand Soybean Varieties

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Working to Create New Illini Brand Soybean Varieties Troy Cary, Crop Sciences - University of Illinois Lauran Widman, ACES Graduate Student - University of IllinoisTroy Cary & Lauran Widman (wihd-man) are working to create twelve-thousand 2017 University of Illinois soybean breeding program plots. Todd Gleason caught up with them on Tuesday morning and put together this look at some of the pre-planting season work.They started out as individually selected…
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Lauran Widman, ACES Graduate Student University of Illinois–YouTube Link

How to Boil, Color, and use Easter Eggs

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How to Boil, Color, and use Easter Eggs
Mary Liz Wright, Extension Nutrition & Wellness - University of Illinois
read blog postIf you haven’t made Easter Eggs for the weekend, you’re in luck. There is still time and Todd Gleason has the how-to details with University of Illinois Extension’s Mary Liz Wright.

Dicamba Soybeans | how to manage herbicide applications

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Dicamba Soybeans | how to manage herbicide applications
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois

read more from Aaron Hager, University of Illinois Extension

Farmers going to the field this spring will be using a brand new type of soybean. Todd Gleason has more on why dicamba-resistant varieties will require them to exercise caution when making herbicide applications.

Dicamba is a very old herbicide…
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Dicamba is a very old herbicide. It has been in use for more than four decades. It kills broadleaf plants and one of the most sensitive of these says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has long been the soybean.
Hager :13 …trying to look at how soybean are.
Quotes Summary - It is one of the most sensitive broadleaf species that is grown in Illinois. You can look in the literature and find studies that have been done now for forty or fifty years really trying to look at how soybean are. Recent wor…

Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Sting Like a Bee

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Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Sting Like a Bee
Jason Haupt, Energy & Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois
read blog spotPollinators play a significant role in keeping habitats healthy and diverse. They are important to agriculture pollinating crops and help in ensuring a good healthy yield. When most people think of pollinators, their first thought is honeybees. However, there are so many more bees than just honey- bees (which are non-native) and more than 3,500 species of native bees in the United States with 228 of them found in Illinois. Without bees, much of the produce that you love to have in the summer would not be available in the quantities or the quality that you love. Peppers, tomatoes, many root vegetables, and many fruits need bees to pollinate and produce healthy produce. Bees ensure that the flowers properly pollinate and produce healthy and abundant fruits, seeds, and vegetables. Research has also shown that an increased na…

Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Float Like a Butterfly

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Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Float Like a Butterfly
Jason Haupt, Energy & Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois
read blog spotWhen you are looking to attract butterflies and other pollinators to your yard, you need to think about providing for all stages in the life of the insects that you want to attract. Insects have multiple life stages, and each stage has a different food requirement. Milkweed is one of the most common plants chosen to attract butterflies, Monarchs specifically, but Milkweed only provides for one of the life stages of the Monarch’s life cycle. To attract and keep the butterflies coming to your yard, you need to provide food for the larval stage (caterpillar), the pupa (chrysalis), and the adult (butterfly) stages. Each stage has specific requirements.

Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Feathered Friends

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Birds, Bees, & Wild Things | Feathered Friends
Jason Haupt, Energy & Environmental Stewardship - University of Illinois
read blog spotAttracting wildlife to your yard is something in which everyone seems to be interested. But knowing how to do this is what many people lack. As you think about attracting wildlife to your yard, the first step is to start looking at your yard as a habitat. All habitats have four elements: water, shelter, food, and space.

Corn & Soybean Planting Date Recommendations

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Corn & Soybean Planting Date Recommendations
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of Illinois Coming up, we’ll hear some planting date recommendations from Emerson Nafziger. Todd Gleason reports the University of Illinois agronomist is surprised by the consistency between corn and soybeans. The University of Illinois has conducted planting date…
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2:40 radio self-containedThe University of Illinois has conducted planting date studies for decades. Emerson Nafziger smiles to himself when he says he’s been here for more than a couple of them. It’s the last 10 years he says that has really changed things.Nafziger :28 …as it probably was twenty or thirty years ago.The big surprise we are finding is that corn and soybean responses are so similar. What I think has happened with genetic improvement in both crops is that they have both become more stress tolerant and resilient. Consequently, late planting is not quite so damaging to yield potential as i…

Are Native Plants Better than Non-Native

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Are Native Plants Better than Non-Native
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog articleThe time of year has come to think about what plants you’d like to put in your yard and garden. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Chris Enroth about how he decides what to plant, and… what to constrain.

Are Cooking Oils Interchangeable

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Are Cooking Oils Interchangeable
Jenna Smith, Extension Nutrition & Wellness, University of Illinois
read blog articleAs you read a recipe, you see it calls for canola oil, but all you have is olive oil. Do you reach for the canola or put on your shoes and head to the store? Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Jenna Smith about the interchangeability of cooking oils.

The American Robin: Living up to its Superhero Image

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The American Robin: Living up to its Superhero Image
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of Illinois

by Chris Enroth, University of Illinois Extension

After an exceptionally mild winter, I noted my first robin sighting about three weeks ago. During that initial observation, scores of robins had arrived in my yard. Spring is a time of year when the migratory American robin can be found scouring the earth in search of protein. Sipping on my coffee, wave after wave of robins hopped through the yard, stopping to cock their head, as if listening for worms in the soil below. Scratching and digging through my leaf mulch, these red-breasted thrushes, found quite a feast.




Our American Robin suffers from an unfortunate Latin/scientific name coincidence- Turdus migratorius. Thumbing through various literature, ornithologists with an impeccably matter-of-fact tone describe the origin of Turdus as Latin for “thrush.”

Though my first sighting of a r…

On the Value of Ethanol in the Gasoline Blend

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On the Value of Ethanol in the Gasoline Blend
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisRead farmdocDaily ArticleThere has been much debate and much written about the likely costs and benefits of including ethanol in the domestic gasoline supply. Costs and benefits fall into two major categories–environmental and economic (e.g., Stock, 2015). One economic consideration is the potential impact on domestic gasoline prices from augmenting the gasoline supply with biofuels. A second economic consideration, and one that has received the most attention, is the cost of ethanol relative to petroleum-based fuel. What has been missing from the analysis of the value of ethanol in the gasoline blend is an estimate of the net value of ethanol based on: i) an energy penalty relative to gasoline; and ii) an octane premium based on the lower price of ethanol relative to petroleum sources of octane. This farmdocDaily article provides an analysis of that net value since J…

Spring Lawn Care | How to Sow Grass Seed

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Spring Lawn Care | How to Sow Grass Seed
John Fulton, Extension County Director - University of IllinoisIf you live in central Illinois you have a choice to make today. You can either decide to control the crabgrass in your lawn, or you can try to fix the dead or thin areas. Todd Gleason has more on the how-to..Spring is about a month earlier than usual this year…
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2:18 radio self-containedSpring is about a month earlier than usual this year across a large part of the eastern United States. It definitely means now is the time to start doing some pre-season lawn care says University of Illinois Extension’s John Fulton. He’s in central Illinois where the time has come to control crabgrass or sow seed. He says you can’t do both, at least not in the same spot. Fulton :16 …kill your germinating grass seeds. Quote Summary - You want to either seed new grass or control crabgrass. You can’t do both in the same season. That’s number one because the same products that wil…

Spring Lawn Maintenance and Seeding

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Spring Lawn Maintenance and Seeding
John Fulton, Extension County Director - University of Illinoislink to blog articleby John Fulton, University of Illinois ExtensionHere we are in the first half of March, and the forsythia is in bloom. This marks the beginning of the crabgrass germination. It is an entire month early, when compared to average. Applications of crabgrass preventers are usually repeated in four to six weeks, but two repeated applications may be suggested this year due to the very early season.Use of a crabgrass preventer is very effective, and the most common way to attack the problem. There are a few products out there, and they are often combined with fertilizer. They all basically kill small seeds as they germinate. They will also do the same with grass seed you have sown, so the two operations do not work together. If you sow seed, you live with the crabgrass for the year. Timing is critical for crabgrass control, and we may have already missed the fir…

Nutrition and Kidney Stones

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Nutrition and Kidney Stones
Lisa Peterson, Nutrition and Wellness Educator - University of Illinois Extension see blog postIt’s National Kidney month. Up next University of Illinois Extension’s Todd Gleason has some ways to avoid kidney stones. About a half a million Americans will go…
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3:04 radio self-containedAbout a half a million Americans will go to the emergency room this year doubled over in pain only to find out there’s not much to do except wait for the kidney stone to pass. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, kidney stones are hard, pebble-like, mineral deposits that form in one or both kidneys. Stones vary in size, shape, and composition. Some kidney stones are as small as a grain of sand, or as large as a pea. Kidney stones form when urine becomes highly concentrated allowing minerals to stick together forming the stones. Because of the variation in size and shape of stones, some kidney stones move throug…

Global Trade of Agricultural Commodities Expected to Grow

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Global Trade of Agricultural Commodities Expected to Grow
Robert Johannson, Chief Economist - United States Department of AgricultureChina purchases two-thirds of the soybeans traded on the planet. Todd Gleason has more on this and other markets for U.S. crops. Over the next ten years, USDA expects global soybean…
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1:47 radio self-contained Over the next ten years, USDA expects global soybean trade to increase by 25% and that Chinese purchases will account for 85% of the increase. The numbers were presented at the Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington D.C., (today, Thursday, Feb 23, 2017) by USDA Chief Economist Rob Johannson. He says the projections are based on the assumption the number of middle-class households in China will double to nearly 250 million by the year 2024. Johannson :14 …India is expected to triple by 2024.Quote Summary - Those households will start demanding more meat, protein, and processed foods in their diet. And looking to other potent…