Posts

Showing posts from 2017

Friday’s USDA Grain Stocks Unlikely to Change Corn Market

ifr170929–254
Friday’s USDA Grain Stocks Unlikely to Change Corn Market
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Friday the United States Department of Agriculture will close out last fall’s harvest and marketing year with the release of the fourth quarter Grain Stocks report. Todd Gleason reports it is not expected to impact the price of corn.

Fall Garden Mums in the Garden

ifr170922–253
tcp170922–02
Fall Garden Mums in the Garden
Kari Houle, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog postIt’s easy to buy potted mums in the fall, but did you know you can put them right into the ground. Next year they’ll come back. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois…

Planting Trees in the Fall

ifr170922–252
tcp170922–01
Planting Trees in the Fall
Beth Allhands, University of Illinois ExtensionWith a few exceptions fall is the best time to plant trees. Todd Gleason has more on the reasons why and some how-to advice from the University of Illinois.

Margin Protection Crop Insurance Decision Due

ifr170922–251
Margin Protection Crop Insurance Decision Due
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisFarmers have until the end of this month to decide if they’d like to take USDA’s new Margin Protection Crop Insurance plan. Todd Gleason has more…Known as M-P, the program most closely aligns…
1:08 radio
1:18 radio self-containedKnown as M-P, the program most closely aligns with the current A-R-P, or Area Revenue Protection crop insurance plan. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey says while there are difference the one of note is the price setting period. It locks in input prices (the margin) based on corresponding futures traded in Chicago for urea, DAP, diesel fuel, and interest rates. Schnitkey :18 …that would be an advantage.Quote Summary - The other side of it you might be interested in is setting a projected price now versus in February. We know that our projected prices for Margin Protection insurance are $3.96 for corn and…

Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years

If you’re on Medicare and happen to have an unusually high taxable income year it will raise your premiums, but not right away. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois Tax School. Two years after a big income year the Federal government takes some of that money back by increasing Medicare premiums says Bob Rhea (ray), a presenter for the U of I Tax School.Quote Summary - For people who are drawing Medicare and paying Medicare premiums the IRS has a rule that says if you have a large income in one year, we wait two years and then look back and determine if you need to pay a higher Medicare premium because you had high income two years prior. Rhea says a typical Medicare Part B and Part D prescription drug plan runs about $150 per month or about $3,600 per year for a married couple. He says it is possible for that to balloon to as much as $12,000 for a single year event because of the sale of a business or other asset. Quote Summary - And we don’t find that out until two y…

Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years

ifr170922–250
Plan for Big Medicare Premiums After Big Income Years
Bob Rhea, University of Illinois Tax School Lecturer | FBFMIf you’re on Medicare and happen to have an unusually high taxable income year it will raise your premiums, but not right away. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois Tax School. Two years after a big income year the Federal…
1:06 radio
1:17 radio self-contained Two years after a big income year the Federal government takes some of that money back by increasing Medicare premiums says Bob Rhea (ray), a presenter for the U of I Tax School.Rhea :20 …had high income two years prior. Quote Summary - For people who are drawing Medicare and paying Medicare premiums the IRS has a rule that says if you have a large income in one year, we wait two years and then look back and determine if you need to pay a higher Medicare premium because you had high income two years prior. Rhea says a typical Medicare Part B and Part D prescription drug plan runs about $1…

Big Income Years Impact Medicare Premiums 2 years Out

ifr170922–249
Big Income Years Impact Medicare Premiums 2 years Out
Bob Rhea, University of Illinois Tax School Lecturer | FBFMFarmers, business owners, and others on Medicare might find a bigger bill in the mail than expected. Todd Gleason has more on how big income years produce big Medicare premiums two years later.

Margin Protection Insurance | an interview with Gary Schnitkey

ifr170922–147
Margin Protection Insurance | an interview with Gary Schnitkey
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisGary Schnitkey assesses the value of Margin Protection Insurance against ARP and RP plans.

Growmark Introduces Simulator to Train Drivers

Image
ifr170922–246
Growmark Introduces Simulator to Train Drivers
Erik Wilcox, Equipment Manager - GrowmarkWe often hear about pilots using simulators to train before they actually fly. As of this year Growmark FS is using a simulator to train its sprayer operators. Todd Gleason has more. This month the company invited reporters to its…
1:23 radio
1:38 radio self-contained
1:25 tv
1:40 tv cgThis month the company invited reporters to its training center in Bloomington, Illinois and after a brief introduction invited them to take a spin in their brand new RoGator. Not a real one, but a simulator that seems pretty darned real even, says Growmark Equipment Manager Erik Wilcox, to those that drive the sprayer for a living. Wilcox :18 …we are headed in the right direction.Quote Summary - I’ve had a lot of doubting Thomases come in and say, “this is just a video game and not anything worthwhile” and with each and every one of them I challenge them to just get on and give me the feedback. Every on…

Corn and Soybean Production Outlook in 2017–18

ifr170922–245
Corn and Soybean Production Outlook in 2017–18
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Given the price reaction, the market remains uncertain about the USDA’s September forecast of 2017 corn and soybean production. Todd Gleason has more with the commodity markets specialist from the University of Illinois.

$45 Million for Photosynthesis Research

Image
ifr170915–244
$45 Million for Photosynthesis Research
(R) IL 13th, Representative Rodney Davis - United States CongressLast Friday (week / Sep 15, 2017), as Todd Gleason reports, political and agricultural leaders gathered on the University of Illinois campus to see transformative work by scientists in photo-synthetic efficiency. Actually it’s a project called R.I.P.E (ripe)….
2:33 radio
3:11 radio self-contained
1:45 tv
2:02 tv cgActually it’s a project called R.I.P.E.. That stands for Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency. It is a $45 million, five-year reinvestment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), and the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID). Illinois Congressman Rodney Davis, a member of the House of Representatives ag committee toured there research facilities, fields, and labs. He says he was impressed (tv skip to soundbite #2).Davis :41 …on less land to feed more people years fro…

Reducing Regs Would Benefit Low-Income Households & Farmers

ifr170915–241
Reducing Regs Would Benefit Low-Income Households & Farmers
Craig Gundersen, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe Senate Ag Committee Thursday (today/yesterday) held a hearing on USDA’s food and nutrition programs and how they relate to the farm bill. On that subject, Todd Gleason reports, a University of Illinois agricultural economist thinks the divide between farmers and those using SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program sometimes called food stamps, should probably close ranks around a couple of issues, including governmental regulations.1:39 radio
2:05 radio self-contained
TV VOICERThe U of I’s Craig Gundersen says there’s plenty of common ground for farmers and low-income households to plow and it all involves back pocket issues. Gundersen :35 …would have a huge benefit for low-income households.Quote Summary - One of the keys ways that we can eliminate food security in the United States is to make sure food prices are low. Low food pr…

Storing Corn and Soybeans in 2017

The current price structure of corn and soybean futures markets indicate positive carry in both markets and raises the question of whether producers should make decisions about grain sales. Todd Gleason reports the decision by producers to store corn or soybeans should be determined by the returns to storage.There will be a lot of corn around this fall…
3:14 radio
3:35 radio self contained ifr170908–228
Storing Corn and Soybeans in 2017
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read blog postThere will be a lot of corn around this fall. USDA projects about sixteen-and-half billion bushels when you add what’s leftover from last year to this year’s harvest. It is projecting about four-point-eight billion bushels of soybeans. That’s a lot of both crops, but University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs isn’t worried about running out of space to store it. In fact, the market is urging farmers to go ahead and store both crops at the moment by pricing futures con…

Interviews from the Farm Progress Show

How Harvey Will Impact Fuel Supply Infrastructure
Dave Chatterton, Powerline Group - Champaign, IllinoisMonday Todd Gleason spoke with Dave Chatterton at the Powerline Group about how Hurricane Harvey is impacting the nation’s fuel supply infrastructure.Southern States Crop Tour Review
Jeremy Wilson, Crop IMS - Effingham, Illinois The corn crop in the south is good. Very good in fact. Todd Gleason talks with Jeremy Wilson from Crop IMS.Discussing Dicamba Damage with Robb Fraley
Robb Fraley, Monsanto Company - St. Louis, Missouri Doug Maxwell, Crops Researcher - University of IllinoisMonsanto’s Robb Fraley dropped by the University of Illinois tent at the Farm Progress Show to talk about dicamba and soybeans. Todd Gleason has more…Recruiting Higher Ed Ag Students to Illinois UniversitiesRecruiters from Illinois State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, and the University of Illinois are planning to work together to keep more agricultural students in state. Todd Gleason discussed the …

2010 Corn Yields and this Season

Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read blog post

Yield is the final factor now in play for this year’s corn crop. Todd Gleason has more on how looking back to the 2010 and 2011 growing seasons might offer some insight.

USDA settled the acreage figure in June…
2:20 radio
2:27 radio self-contained



USDA settled the acreage figure in June, and while it could be updated for corn in the October Crop Production report, enough of the season has passed for most to be satisfied it won’t change much. This leaves yield as the only determining factor then for U.S. corn production. Right now that is set at 169.5 bushels to the acre nationwide. It could change thinks University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs. If it does, he says, it might follow a pattern like the corn crop of 2010 or maybe 2011.

Hubbs :40 …under similar scenario with pollination issues.

Quote Summary - The last few years the USDA’s August forecast has been within a bushel of the final estimat…

Owned & Share Cropped Land Making up Cash Rent Losses

Image
The high price of cash rent for corn ground in Illinois has been a loser over the last three seasons. It looks like that may continue for two more years. Todd Gleason has more on how owned ground, and share cropped acres have been making up the difference.





ifr170825–213
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

Assessing the Prospects for 2017 Corn Production

The August Crop Production report surprised many market observers by forecasting 2017 corn production at 14.153 billion bushels. In particular, the corn yield forecast of 169.5 bushels per acre came under scrutiny due to higher than expected yield forecasts in major producing states. The question is whether the corn production forecast will change enough to result in higher prices than those currently reflected the market.



ifr170825–212
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read blog post

CME Group Provides Scholarships for Agriculture

Image
ifr170818–211

Agricultural companies are always on the hunt for good employees, but those with college educations can be hard to find. Todd Gleason reports from the Illinois State Fair that the world’s largest options and futures exchange is hoping to inspire a few more kids to further their education.
The CME Group, for the third year in a row…

1:38 radio
1:57 radio self-contained
1:49
1:57 tv cg





The CME Group, for the third year in a row at the Illinois State Fair, is providing the kids showing the Grand Champion animals $5000 scholarships for their education funds. This year says CME’s Tim Andriesen they’ve upped that ante a bit and will also provide nine $1000 scholarships. He says this is because agriculture will need a lot of really bright people to provide food for the planet.

Andriesen :18 …they are going to develop.

Quote Summary - The U.N. will tell you that there will be nine-billion people to feed in 2050. That is going to require a lot of growth in agriculture. It will r…

NAFTA Negotiations Start Wednesday

Image
ifr170818–210

Trade negotiators from Mexico and Canada will gather in Washington, D.C. this week to update NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement. Todd Gleason has more…

The Trump Administration wants to update the 1994 pact… 1:39 radio
1:49 radio self-contained
1:42 tv 1:52 tv cg





The Trump Administration wants to update the 1994 pact to include data transfer protections, ensure products produced in Mexico comply more closely with U.S. environmental and labor laws, and to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with the NAFTA countries. Traveling in the Midwest last week U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue voiced a much shorter list.

Perdue :37 …do no harm to agriculture in those negotiations.

Quote Summary - Not all sectors have benefitted equally. We know that. Our vegetable and fruit producers in the south, whether it is in Texas or Florida have not done as well. But the grain guys up here have done very, very well. DDGs and other things are going well. We want to make sure th…

Google Makes $1.5 Million Gift to 4-H

Image
ifr170811–207

Google, through its philanthropic arm, has made a $1.5 million gift to 4-H across the nation. The company is providing both funding support and virtual reality equipment to 4-H youth computer science programs. It made the announcement at the Illinois State Fair Friday, August 11, 2017.

Todd Hubbs Review August Crop Reports

ifr170811-204
USDA Crop Production report.

Corn production is forecast at 14.2 billion bushels, down 7 percent from last year. Based on conditions as of August 1, yields are expected to average 169.5 bushels per acre, down 5.1 bushels from 2016. If realized, this will be the third highest yield and production on record for the United States. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 83.5 million acres, unchanged from the June forecast but down 4 percent from 2016.

Soybean production is forecast at 4.38 billion bushels, up 2 percent from last year. Based on August 1 conditions, yields are expected to average 49.4 bushels per acre, down 2.7 bushels from last year. Area for harvest in the United States is forecast at a record high 88.7 million acres, unchanged from the June forecast but up 7 percent from 2016. Planted area for the Nation is estimated at a record high 89.5 million acres, also unchanged from June.

All wheat production, at 1.74 billion bushels, is down 1 percent from the Jul…

How USDA NASS Gathers Crop Production Report Data

ifr170804–197

USDA NASS will release the first corn and soybean Crop Production Report of the season Thursday August 10th, 2017. Todd Gleason talks with USDA NASS State Statistician Mark Schleusener (shloy-seh-ner) about how the information is collected and calculated.

Assessing the Pulse of the Next Farm Bill Debate with Carl Zulauf

ifr170804–196
read blog post

Thirteen agricultural economists put together short papers describing issues that will surface during the writing of the next farm bill. For each issue, the author describes the “policy setting” and details “farm bill issues” that likely will arise during negotiations. Each issue then has a “what to watch for” summary. These papers, along with an overview, are presented in an article posted to the farmdocDaily website.

How to Control Aggressive Garden Plants

ifr170804–198
read blog post

Aggressive, invasive, and garden-thug are all terms commonly used by gardeners to describe those garden perennials that tend to overtake intended areas. It all starts with good intention. Usually a garden friend who wants to share a division of a plant they have an abundance of, or a gorgeous plant at the garden center whose label fails to note its aggressive growth habit.

Extrapolating Yields from USDA's Crop Conditions

ifr170804–195
Extrapolating Yields from USDA’s Crop Conditions
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois It’s about this time of year that USDA’s Crop Condition reports can be used, in part, to develop corn and soybean yields. Todd Gleason has more on why that is the case and some projections. The agricultural economists at the University… 2:17 radio
2:26 radio self-contained The agricultural economists at the University of Illinois have been tweaking yields out of the USDA crop conditions reports for quite some time. They say the later in the season it gets the more accurate they become. Right about now is usually when the good to excellent ratings, along with all the rest, begin to zero in on what’s really happening across America says Darrel Good.Good :40 …correlation between final ratings and yields. We do know that the initial ratings for both crops are generally a bit on the high side. That is crops always look good early in the season before weather has had it…

EPA Must Make Good Lost Biofuels Gallons

ifr170804–194
EPA Must Make Good Lost Biofuels Gallons
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The courts have ruled in favor of biofuels made from corn and soybeans. Todd Gleason has more on what the ruling could mean for ethanol and biodiesel.The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for Washington… 2:32 radio
2:40 radio self-contained The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for Washington, D.C. under took a case to define the meaning of three words in the Renewable Fuel Standard written by the United States Congress. The three words, a phrase, are “inadequate domestic supply”. Congress through them says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin granted the Environmental Protection Agency, the EPA, the right to grant a waiver allowing energy producers not to follow the law. Irwin :12 …you cannot require someone to consume it.Which commonsense would say, yes, you need that kind of escape clause in the statute that would say if a biofuel is not being produced you…

U.S. Circuit Court Rules in Favor of Biofuels

ifr170728–193
U.S. Circuit Court Rules in Favor of Biofuels
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled against the United States Environmental Protection Agency Friday. Todd Gleason has more on how the ruling could impact biofuels production in the United States.

Why North Dakota Farmers Plant Corn & Soybeans

ifr170728–192
Why North Dakota Farmers Plant Corn & Soybeans
Mark Formo, Farmer - Litchville, North Dakota Jim Howe, Farmer - Casselton, North DakotaThe Dakota’s have been opting for a changing crop rotation over the last decade and half. Todd Gleason reports farmers there have been searching out the best alternatives. Mark Formo is from Litchville…
1:58 radio
2:10 radio self-contained Mark Formo is from Litchville. That’s about 85 miles west of Fargo. He used to plant sun flowers. He doesn’t anymore because the blackbirds, you heard me right, blackbirds were eating up his profits. Formo :19 …anything from an 82 to a 95 day corn. Quote Summary - We lost hundreds of pounds per acre to blackbirds and we just needed something else to do. That and we know that corn varieties, and genetics are phenomenal for corn. We try to raise anything from an 82 to a 95 day corn. Those are really short season varieties by comparison to the 110 day corn farmers in the I states use, Illinois, Indiana,…

Soybean Exports Stronger than Expected, but...

ifr170728–190
Soybean Exports Stronger than Expected, but…
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe price of soybeans has remained strong, but there is good reason not to be overly optimistic. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois.Farmers in South America harvested a big bean…
1:31 radio
1:41 radio self-containedFarmers in South America harvested a big bean crop this year. No, that’s not right, Brazilian farmers harvested an enormous soybean crop. Despite this U.S. soybean exports have remained very strong much later into the calendar year than usual. It wasn’t expected says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs, and he says it is a positive sign.Hubbs :12 …about 48 it is going to be a huge crop.Quote Summary - Having said that, we are still looking at eighty-nine-and-a-half million acres of soybeans with an undetermined yield right now. If it hits trend of about 48, it is going to be a huge crop. Hubbs has been watching the supp…

Soybeans More Profitable than Corn

ifr170728–189
Soybeans More Profitable than Corn
read blog postSoybeans have been more profitable than corn over the last three years, and an ILLINOIS agricultural economist expects that to continue to be the case this year and next. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois… Gary Schnitkey has updated crop budgets…
1:06 radio
1:19 radio self contained Gary Schnitkey has updated crop budgets for highly productive central Illinois farmland. It shows, as was the case in 2013, 2014, 2015, & 2016, that planting soybeans will make farmers more money than planting corn this year and in 2018. The cash price of corn will need to exceed $4.00 a bushel if that is to change, at least with soybeans in the high $9.00 a bushel range. Schnitkey in his farmdocDaily article, you can find that online, says there are four points to be aware of as it relates to the 2017 and 18 crop budgets. first, these can change as expected yields and price evolvesecond, repeating this, corn needs to be a…

A Weather Market & Corn Yields

ifr170728–186
A Weather Market & Corn Yields
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe corn market has been up and down with the weather forecast this summer. Todd Gleason has this look at current conditions impacting price. Each day the weather changes and just as often…
1:52 radio
1:59 radio self-contained Each day the weather changes and just as often, it seems, so has the direction of corn prices. Todd Hubbs from the University of Illinois was of the opinion a couple of weeks ago that corn market had a some upside potential. It did, but now, maybe it doesn’t. This has him thinking about the number of acres of corn in the United States, the impact of the weather on yield, and how the market might react August 10th when the United States Department of Agriculture releases the first corn crop production report of the season.Hubbs :40 …with about 168/169 yield on August 10th. Quote Summary - We talk about increased corn acreage and maybe a yield loss below tren…

Barley, Beer, Budweiser

Image
ifr170721–184
Barley, Beer, Budweiser
Alan Slater, Director Midwest Barley Operations - Anheuser Busch Jim Howe, Howe Seed Farms - Casselton, North DakotaWhen you reach for that ice cold Budweiser it has a lot farm country in it. Anheuser Busch celebrated its relationship with barley growers this month (July 19 & 20, 2017). Todd Gleason has more from a harvest table at Howe Seed Farms about twenty miles due west of Fargo, North Dakota.1:42 radio
2:00 radio self-contained
1:44 tv 2:00 tv cg The barley malt delivered to Anheuser Busch in St. Louis, Missouri comes from farmers way up north in the United States. It’s processed in Moorhead, Minnesota. Alan Slater is the Director of Midwest Barley Operations and he spent some time earlier this month letting folks know just how important the barley farmers, and it is pretty safe to say he knows a lot of them, are to making beer. Slater :22 ….rural communities and moving on to the end product.Quote Summary - We get to deliver this barley f…

Butterfly Weed | a milkweed for your yard & garden

ifr170630–169
Butterfly Weed | a milkweed for your yard & garden
Candice Hart, Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois
read blog postThe butterfly weed is a favorite of Candice Hart as a great cut flower, but also as a milkweed that supports the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly. Commonly known as butterfly weed, this long-lived and striking perennial is native to much of the continental United States, along with Canadian provinces Ontario and Quebec.

Food Deserts, Amazon Prime, & SNAP

ifr170630–168
Food Deserts, Amazon Prime, & SNAP
Craig Gundersen, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
Amazon Prime EBT PageThere is a new twist for USDA’s food and feeding programs. Part of 2014 Farm Bill is piloting ten new delivery systems that will allow people using the SNAP program to order food online for home delivery. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Craig Gundersen says when you look deeper this program can do a lot to help those who cannot always help themselves or that simply don’t have easy access to a grocery store. He says this is because there are food deserts in the United States.Gundersen 1:21 …through some of these home delivery programs.
audio & video clips availableThe Amazon Prime program is already in place for EBT card holders. EBT stands for Electronic Benefits Transfer. The discounted Amazon Prime membership, $5.99 per month rather than $10.99, cannot be purchased with the card. Food is available to those using USDA’s SNAP, WIC, …

USDA’s June 30 Grain Stocks Report for Corn

ifr170630–167
USDA’s June 30 Grain Stocks Report for Corn
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Friday the United States Department of Agriculture will estimate how much corn is left in the country. This amount will need to sustain the nation through the fall harvest. Todd Gleason has more on the Grain Stocks report. The Grain Stocks report is released once a quarter…
3:29 radio
3:43 radio self-contained The Grain Stocks report is released once a quarter by USDA. It is made up of two parts. The first is a survey, nearly a census, of the number of bushels - in this case of corn - a grain elevator, terminal, or other type of certified storage facility has in possession. These are tallied as off farm bushels. The other part is more of a guesstimate of how many on farm bushels are in storage. When combined these two surveys provide a picture of how many bushels are available in the United States, the available supply. The market keeps track of this, too. When the repo…

Wood Chip Bioreactor Controls Tile Line Nitrate Load

Image
ifr170623–164
Wood Chip Bioreactor Controls Tile Line Nitrate Load
Laura Christianson, Crop Sciences - University of IllinoisThe Dudley Smith farm in Illinois is tiled and wired. Todd Gleason has more on how the University of Illinois is doing nitrogen loss research near Pana. Farmers gathered this week for a peek…
1:38 radio
1:45 radio self-contained
1:38 tv
1:45 tv cgFarmers gathered this week for a peek at the nitrogen loss control methods installed in Christian County. It’s a farm that rolls just a bit, but is pretty typical for the area other than the pastures on a portion of it. They came to hear from Laura Christianson. She’s a University of Illinois Crop Scientist.Christianson :27 …nitrate is taken out of the drainage water. Quote Summary - At the Dudley Smith farm we have a wood chip bioreactor installed. A wood chip bioreactor is a little mini water treatment plant to clean nitrate out of tile drainage. The thing that makes the Dudley Smith bioreactor different is that is has…

What Makes a Top Third Farm

ifr170623–163
What Makes a Top Third Farm
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThere are just two items that make the difference between a top third farm and an average farm. Todd Gleason has more…This University of Illinois study was…
1:28 radio
1:38 radio self-containedThis University of Illinois study was on a small set in Mclean County. This was done to limit the influences of weather and a few other factors. Gary Schnitkey says he wanted to know why some farms made more than others. Turns out, the answer is pretty simple.Schnitkey :22 …machinery depreciation and interest cost.Quote Summary - What we found were distinct cost differences between the two groups. This was a $45 per acre difference between the average group and the high return group. The $45 came primarily in two items; machinery depreciation and interest cost.The more profitable farms tended to have lower machinery and non-land interest cost. The two are related says the University of Illinoi…

Feeding Wheat CoProducts to Pigs

ifr170623–161
READER
Feeding Wheat CoProducts to Pigs
Hans Stein, Animal Scientist - University of Illinois Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the quality of protein in wheat middlings and red dog. Both are co-products of the wheat milling process. Each can be fed to pigs and other livestock.There is information about the digestibility of crude protein in some wheat co-products produced in Canada and China, says University of Illinois Animal Scientist Hans Stein, but only very limited information about the nutritional value of wheat middlings and red dog produced in the United States.Stein and U of I researcher Gloria Casas fed wheat middlings from 8 different states and red dog from Iowa to growing pigs. Despite the variety in the wheat middlings sources the concentration of crude protein were generally consistent. However, they did find some variation in the digestibility of the amino acids.The red dog contained slightly less crude protein than wheat mid…

Check Dicamba Soybeans After Spraying

Image
ifr170623–159
Check Dicamba Soybeans After Spraying
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois Farmers are turning to an old technology this year to control weeds in their fields. Todd Gleason has more on what they can expect from a new, old-product.Dicamba has been around for about half-a-century…
1:19 radio
1:31 radio self-contained
1:21 tv
1:36 tv cg Dicamba has been around for about half-a-century. It is a corn herbicide, but soybeans have been modified to tolerate it. This was done because so many weeds have modified themselves to resist being killed by glyphosate, commonly known as Round-Up. The primary problem, says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager, is waterhemp. Hager :11 ….but it is not excellent. It is not as consistent. Quote Summary - Dicamba, in the 50 years that we’ve used it, has never been excellent on any of the pigweed species. It can be good. It can be very good, but it is not excellent. It is not as consistent. This inc…

Hog Prices Continue to be Higher

ifr170609–152
Hog Prices Continue to be Higher
Chris Hurt, Extension Agricultural Economist - Purdue University Despite more hogs coming to market this year, the price of pork remains higher. Todd Gleason has more on some of the reasons why. For agricultural commodities, larger supplies generally…
2:07 radio 2:12 radio self-containedQuote Summary - For agricultural commodities, larger supplies generally result in lower prices. This year’s hog market is going against that adage with both larger supplies and higher prices. Purdue University Extension Agricultural Economist Christ Hurt says this is because demand is really good.Hurt :25 …twenty-two percent of our domestic production.Quote Summary - The most important reason for higher prices involves favorable international trade for U.S. pork. Pork exports have been up 17 percent and pork imports have been down 10 percent. For trade data available so far this year, pork exports have accounted for 22 percent of our domestic production.Thi…

Crop Progress Reports & End of Season Yields

Image
ifr170609–149
Crop Progress Reports & End of Season Yields
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read blog postLast week USDA released its first national corn condition rating of the season. The crop, as you’ll hear, wasn’t in great shape. While it doesn’t mean much at this time of year, Todd Gleason reports there is a relationship between the first crop condition rating and the end of the season yield. The weekly Crop Progress report is mostly…
2:02 radio
2:20 radio self-contained
2:02 tv
2:22 tv cg The weekly Crop Progress report is mostly the work of Extension and FSA employees, at the least the data collection part. They report local crop conditions to state USDA offices, mostly on Monday morning, who in-turn tally those numbers and pass them along to Washington, D.C. for compilation and release on Monday afternoon. Work at the University of Illinois shows a strong relationship between the end-of-season crop condition ratings and crop yield, however, agric…

Master Gardeners Bloom through Training

ifr170602–148
Master Gardeners Bloom through Training
Kelly Allsup, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of Illinois
read blog postMasters Gardeners spend time in the community giving back in wondrous ways. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension’s Kelly Allsup about the volunteer program, its great success, and heartfelt giving.

Dealing with Wind Damaged Trees

ifr170602
Dealing with Wind Damaged Trees
Chris Enroth, Extension Horticulture Specialist - University of Illinois
read blog postHigh winds can take a toll on trees. Assessing the damage and setting about clean up is an important task for the future health of the tree and the landscape surrounding it. Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Extension Horticulture Specialist Chris Enroth about what to do.

Another Rough Income Year for Grain Farmers

ifr170602–146
Another Rough Income Year for Grain Farmers
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois It looks like 2017 will be another rough year for grain farmers in the United States. Todd Gleason has more on the projected incomes.Even in Illinois, where the trend line yield for corn is 200…
2:06
2:14 Even in Illinois, where the trend line yield for corn is 200 bushels to the acre and 61 for soybeans, the average income on a 1500 acre grain for this year is just $25,000. That’s not good says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey.Schnitkey :24 …if these projections hold.Quote Summary - That $25,000 isn’t enough to cover all the family living withdrawals and capital purchase expenses needed for a family farm of this size. Seventy to eighty-thousand dollars is needed to be sustainable in the long run. So, we are looking, again, at some financial deterioration if these projections hold. It is a projection that wasn’t quite so low earlier in th…

Post-Emergence Herbicides in Corn

Image
ifr170602–144
Post-Emergence Herbicides in Corn
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois
read blog postIt is time for farmers to control weeds in their corn fields. However, as Todd Gleason reports, the cool, wet start to the growing season makes it doubly important to read and follow herbicide labels.1:55 radio
1:58 radio self-contained
1:56 tv
2:00 tv cg Farmers are heading to the field again. This time with machinery used to control weeds. The post-emergence herbicide labels they’ll be following usually allow applications to be made at various growth stages says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager.(Gleason Stand Up) Hager says it is really important to read the label, making sure to get the height, or the stage, maybe both, of the crop correct.This is because most all of the products for corn have a growth stage listed on the label beyond which applications, at least broadcast applications, should not be made. It is usually either plant h…

Don’t Risk a Lot to Save a Little

ifr170526–143
Don’t Risk a Lot to Save a Little
Karen Chan, University of Illinois Extension
read blog post“Don’t risk a lot to save a little”, that simple phrase has stuck with University of Illinois Extension’s Karen Chan through many years. All the way back she says to when she learned it while studying for her Certified Financial Planner designation. It is one of three basic principles of risk management. The idea is not to try saving a nickel when that decision might end up costing $10. Karen has a list of examples.

Treat NOW for Emerald Ash Borer

ifr170526–142
Treat NOW for Emerald Ash Borer
Phil Nixon, Extension Entomologist - University of Illinois
read blog postEmerald ash borer adults are emerging from Illinois to Ohio and points northward. Todd Gleason has more on what to do if you want to save your tree.They’ll continue to do so for several weeks…
1:20 radio
1:37 radio self-containedThey’ll continue to do so for several weeks and it means now is the time to treat for them in hopes of saving your Ash tree. This should most definitely be done if the emerald ash borer has been found within fifteen miles of your tree says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Phil Nixon.Nixon : …find the girls and you eliminate the problem.Quote Summary - If you treat the trees on an annual or bi-annual basis for approximately 20 years, this is about the amount of time it will take for the untreated trees to all die, then the number of emerald ash borer drops down and the boys cannot find the girls and you eliminate the problem. Again,…

Adjusting Nitrogen for this Corn Crop

Image
ifr170526–141
Adjusting Nitrogen for this Corn Crop
Emerson Nafziger, Agronomist - University of Illinois
read blog postDespite the wet weather many think may be causing nitrogen fertilizer to get away from corn plants, it is still far too early to make that decision. Todd Gleason has more…While it seems likely some nitrogen fertilizer…
2:14 radio
2:27 radio self-contained
2:17 tv
2:27 tv cgWhile it seems likely some nitrogen fertilizer has moved out of the upper soil as a result of rainfall this year University of Illinois Agronomist Emerson Nafziger says if soils dry out, the torrential rains stop, the sun shines, and the weather gets warmer things should be all good.Nafziger :29 …to look good in almost every field. The crop is going to tell us this. If by the middle of June some of the crop has really greened up nicely and some has not, then we might need to think about those that haven’t and determine if enough nitrogen is missing to cause this to take place. My suspicion is we will…

Trump Administration Budget Sets Farm Bill Guide Posts

ifr170526–139
Trump Administration Budget Sets Farm Bill Guide Posts
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois This week the Trump Administration released its FY18 budget. It includes harsh cuts to agricultural entitlement programs. Todd Gleason discusses the plan with University of Illinois Agricultural Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess.