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Showing posts from May, 2016

Corn Prices to Reflect Summer Wx & Demand Strength

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Corn Prices to Reflect Summer Wx & Demand Strength
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Summer has arrived and so has the critical three month period in which the nation’s food supply will be established. The commodity markets will follow weather conditions, crop ratings, and weather forecasts in order to form yield expectations. Todd Gleason reports the starting place is typically to assume a normal growing season. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel… 3:33 radio
3:48 radio self contained University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good starts each growing season, generally speaking, in the same way. He analyzes the market using a normal growing season conditions. This calculation for corn puts the University of Illinois 2016 national average yield at 166.4 bushels to the acre. One of the factors that influences the direction and magnitude of early yield adjustments is the timeliness of planting, recognizing that yield…

University of Illinois Weed Science Field Research Tour

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VOICER (radio & tv)
University of Illinois Weed Science Field Research Tour
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois The Extension scientists on the University of Illinois campus in Urbana-Champaign have scheduled their annual field day. The Weed Science tour is set for Wednesday June 29th says Aaron Hager.Hager :24 …plots on the Animal Sciences tracts.Quote Summary - It’ll be at the South Farms and will begin roughly between 7:30 and 8:00 o’clock in the morning. It will be very similar in terms of format to what we’ve done before. We’ll all gather around the South Farms at the Seed House for a few introductory remarks and comments, and then everybody will get back into their vehicles and we’ll car pool across Windsor Road and look at some of the research plots on the Animal Sciences tracts. Again, the 2016 University of Illinois Weed Science Field Day is Wednesday, June 29th at the University of Illinois Crop Sciences Research and Education Cent…

Will Summer Pricing Opportunities Materialize for Corn & Soybeans

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Will Summer Pricing Opportunities Materialize for Corn & Soybeans
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The very low price of corn and soybeans, and predictions for even lower prices later in the year, has farmers worried. They’re wondering, even hopeful, if a summer weather rally could offer up a pricing opportunity. Todd Gleason reports Darrel Good tries to answer this question in the May 23rd Weekly Outlook on the FarmDocDaily website.There are a couple of factors the online article addresses…
4:03 radio
4:23 radio self contained There are a couple of factors the online article addresses. The first is pretty simple. Boiled down Darrel Good says a supply problem in South America is a demand boost for North America, in this case for both corn and soybeans.Good :13 …appears exports may exceed these higher projections. Quote Summary - Weekly exports for both crops continue to be larger than needed to reach the USDA’s most recent export projection…

$4.20 Corn Needed to Stabilize Grain Farm Income

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$4.20 Corn Needed to Stabilize Grain Farm Income
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
link to article onlineGrain farmers throughout the Midwest are suffering through a third straight year of losses and prices don’t look to go high enough, yet, to stabilize net incomes. A University of Illinois study suggests the cash price of corn needs to be $4.20 a bushel to make that happen. Todd Gleason has more…It’s been a rough couple of years and grain farmers…
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2:13 radio self contained
1:59 tv
2:19 tv cgIt’s been a rough couple of years and grain farmers need higher prices to stabilize their operations. Stable means $60,000 in on and off farm income on a 1500 acre corn and soybean farm in central Illinois says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey. Schnitkey :25 …see gains in net income and financial stability.Quote Summary - To have that happen prices have to be a $4.20 for corn, $10.20 for soybeans. If we hav…

Marestail Control Prior to Planting

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Marestail Control Prior to Planting
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois
link to article onlineFarmers in Illinois, other states too, are struggling to control glyphosate resistant weeds. Todd Gleason has more on marestail. Marestail can be one of the most challenging…
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1:20 radio self containedMarestail can be one of the most challenging under no-till conditions prior to planting soybeans. More often than not farmers are using a tank mix of glyphosate and 2,4-D (two-four-dee). Sometimes the problem is that the weed is already too big to control, at others says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager is its just that the 2,4-D isn’t doing the job any better than the glyphosate.Hager :37 …of the tank mix that still has activity. Quote Summary - Well, there are some alternatives that can be used for control of mares tail in a burn down scenario. A product called Sharpen could be included with glyphosate/2,4-D to try to …

Summer Weather, El Niño, & Corn Yields

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Summer Weather, El Niño, & Corn Yields
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe agricultural economists at the land grant university in Illinois have gone through 56 years of weather data to see if there is any connection between the current El Niño event and trend yields for corn. Todd Gleason has more…The ag economists at Illinois say the trend…
2:59 radio
3:13 radio self contained The trend yield for corn has been going up 1.8 bushels per yer for about 50 years say the number crunchers from the University of Illinois. It means, under normal weather conditions with a little adjustment upward, this year’s corn crop should average 166.2 bushels to the acre nationwide. U.S. Average Corn Yield, 1960–2015The 166.2 is the norm, but it lives within a range that would be indicative of really good years like 2004 and really bad years like 2012 says U of I’s Scott Irwin. Irwin :14 …doesn’t happen every year that we call El Niño.Quote Summary - And now w…

What's with all the Yellow Flowers in the Fields

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What’s with all the Yellow Flowers in the Fields
Aaron Hager, Weed Scientist - University of Illinois If you’ve been driving around a good part of the nation you’ll have noticed a lot of yellow flowers in the fields. Todd Gleason has more on this springtime show. Mostly you’ll see these yellow flowers in fields…
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1:32 radio self contained
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1:37 tv cgYou’ll see the bright color in fields stretching from Texas east to Florida, northward along the Atlantic coast to Virginia, and back west to Nebraska. It’s butterweed says University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager.Hager :14 …these very bright showy yellow flowers.Quote Summary - And butterweed is typically a species that germinates in the fall. It will overwinter as a small rosette of leaves and then about late April to the early part of May it bolts and produces these very bright showy yellow flowers.The bad news for farmers is that because the plant has flowered it is going to get much harder to con…

Summer Weather, El Niño, & Corn Yields

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Summer Weather, El Niño, & Corn Yields
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe agricultural economists at the land grant university in Illinois have gone through 56 years of weather data to see if there is any connection between the current El Niño event and trend yields for corn. Todd Gleason has more…The ag economists at Illinois say the trend…
2:59 radio
3:13 radio self contained The trend yield for corn has been going up 1.8 bushels per yer for about 50 years say the number crunchers from the University of Illinois. It means, under normal weather conditions with a little adjustment upward, this year’s corn crop should average 166.2 bushels to the acre nationwide. The 166.2 is the norm, but it lives within a range that would be indicative of really good years like 2004 and really bad years like 2012 says U of I’s Scott Irwin. Irwin :14 …doesn’t happen every year that we call El Niño.Quote Summary - And now what we want to ask is if we should…

Falling Cattle Prices, Where Is the Bottom

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Falling Cattle Prices, Where Is the Bottom
Chris Hurt, Agricultural Economist - Purdue University ExtensionThe price of cattle has been on a downward spiral for months and ranchers and farmers are wondering when it’ll hit bottom. Todd Gleason has more on the coming prospects for the price of beef. Cattle prices have had a rough spring…
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3:22 radio self containedCattle prices have had a rough spring. After peaking in late 2014 and early 2015, prices have been adjusting downward from very lofty peaks writes Purdue University Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt on the FarmDocDaily website. He says this is because back then high prices and the lure of profits caused beef producers to build the national herd.Hurt :14 …downward price pressure is expected this summer.Quote Summary - Expanding beef production and a remarkable recovery in total meat supplies continues to put downward pressure on cattle prices. Unfortunately, more downward price pressure is expect…