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Showing posts from June, 2016

Peoria 4-H Club to Make Contact with Astronaut

Peoria 4-H Club to Make Contact with Astronaut
Judy Schmidt, 4-H Youth Development - University of Illinois ExtensionA temporary 4-H Club in Peoria Illinois is just getting started on an out-of-this-world journey. Todd Gleason has more on how the club, and maybe your 11–14 year old too, will make contact with the International Space Station at the end of July. 0:57 radio
1:14 radio self containedTonight, through the month of July, 4-H’ers interested in radio, electronics, computers, space, and NASA will meet at the Peoria Riverfront Museum. It’s a club open to any 11–14 year olds around the state says Extension’s Judy Schmidt.Schmidt :30 …that’s when the actual call will happen.Quote Summary - It only meets four Tuesdays and it is in the evening from 6–7:30pm. This might make it more accessible for families that have to work. The first three sessions will be devoted to activities related to HAM radio, Morse code, and satellites. During the last session they’ll plan questions and what …

Modest Pork Expansion, but Brexit Casts Shadow

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Modest Pork Expansion, but Brexit Casts Shadow
Christ Hurt, Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist If you’re wondering how the Brexit will impact U.S. agriculture, you might skip on over to the FarmDocDaily website. You’ll find an article there titled Modest Pork Expansion, but Brexit Casts Shadow. It is written by Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. In it he says since the Brexit announcement, the dollar has increased by about 3.5 percent relative to the Euro and that the countries in the European Union have been the largest exporters of pork in the world for the last two years. He goes on say that farmers selling pork from the 19 countries in the EU that use the Euro now have an immediate price advantage over U.S. pork producers. too. Hurt :09 …competitor a sizable and immediate price advantage. Quote Summary - Brexit gives our biggest global pork competitor a sizable and immediate price advantage. You may read more from Purdue’s Chris Hurt about the #B…

University of Illinois Weed Science Field Research Tour

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VOICER (radio & tv)
University of Illinois Weed Science Field Research Tour
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois This Wednesday farmers and others interested in weeds can learn more at University of Illinois’ Weed Science Field Tour. The tour kicks off early in the morning says U of I’s Aaron Hager. Hager :24 …plots on the Animal Sciences tracts.Quote Summary - It’ll be at the South Farms and will begin roughly between 7:30 and 8:00 o’clock in the morning. It will be very similar in terms of format to what we’ve done before. We’ll all gather around the South Farms at the Seed House for a few introductory remarks and comments, and then everybody will get back into their vehicles and we’ll car pool across Windsor Road and look at some of the research plots on the Animal Sciences tracts. Again, the 2016 University of Illinois Weed Science Field Day is this Wednesday, June 29th at the University of Illinois Crop Sciences Research and Education Ce…

Agronomy Day on the South Farms August 18, 2016

URBANA, Ill. – Have questions about pest resistance or curious about the use of drones in agriculture? Plan to hear more on these and other topics related to crop sciences at the 59th annual Agronomy Day at the University of Illinois on August 18.

Field tour topics and speakers for Agronomy Day 2016 were recently announced. Topics include:

TOUR A
Cataloging the weapons arsenal of the Fusarium head blight pathogen
Genetic resistance for northern leaf blight and Goss’ wilt in corn
Stripe rust and scab resistance in wheat
Bt resistance in corn rootworm beetles Nematodes: How does the worm turn?

TOUR B
Nitrogen management: Balancing profitability with sustainability
Economics of nutrient management
Land values
Six weed management predictions to keep you up at night
Investigating low crop emergence in edamame

TOUR C
The show must go on: Balancing water use under continuously changing environmental conditions
Cover crops for soybean and corn rotation
Soybean planting date and variety matur…

National GMO Labeling Bill in Motion

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The U.S. Senate’s agricultural committee has reached a food labeling bill agreement that could set aside the state of Vermont’s GMO law. Ranking members Pat Roberts of Kansas, a Republican, and Debbie Stabenaw, a Michigan Democrat, announced a digital codes compromise. If the full Senate and the House pass the legislation food packages containing a narrowly defined set of genetically engineered ingredients would include a digital disclosure code or an on package symbol or language that the Agriculture Department would approve. The code, which could be scanned by a smartphone, would be accompanied by the sentence, “Scan here for more food information”.

The compromise narrowly defines genetically modified for the purposes of food labels. Only ingredients derived from GMO’s made by transferring genes from one organism to another would require labeling. Foods made with ingredients where the genetic code is edited - a deleted or duplicated gene for example - would not require the GMO notif…

Soybean Stocks, Acreage, and Weather

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Soybean Stocks, Acreage, and Weather
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The price of soybeans has rallied so much this season that one agricultural economist is doubtful there is much additional upside potential. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois.New crop soybeans are worth about two-and-half dollars…
2:18 radio 2:28 radio self containedNew crop soybeans are worth about two-and-half dollars more today than back in February when farmers purchased insurance to cover the price risk inherent in farming. The rise has to do with a short crop from South America, above average temperatures in the United States, and only scattered rainfall in the mid-section of the nation. Farmers can now sell beans for about $11 a bushel for fall delivery, and that doesn’t seem too bad to University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good.Good :23 …less sensitive to summer weather than are corn yields. Quote Summary - While there is a potential…

Corn Stocks, Acreage, and Yield

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Corn Stocks, Acreage, and Yield
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The price of corn in Chicago is up about 75 cents since the end of March and this may represent a good new crop corn marketing opportunity. Todd Gleason has more from the University of Illinois.The price strength comes from dry weather conditions…
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4:38 radio self containedThe price strength comes from dry weather conditions in South America and the associated strength in export demand for U.S. corn writes University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good on the Farm Doc Daily website. He also indicates there are expectations for planted acreage to fall short of intentions; and some recent yield concerns associated with an extended period of hot weather. Good says that last note is really important, but that the end of the month USDA reports are likely to weigh heavily on the trade.Good :24 …during the third quarter of the marketing year.Quote Summary - Prices wi…

State of Illinois Open Meetings Act Webinar June 16

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TCP–160608–02 State of Illinois Open Meetings Act Webinar June 16
Chris Casey, Extension Community & Economic Development - University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois Extension is hosting a webinar June 16, 2016 from noon to 1pm on the State of Illinois Open Meetings Act. It is sponsored in part by the State of Illinois Attorney General’s office and aimed at helping elected local government officials (and staff) understand the Opening Meetings Act and its requirements.REGISTER ONLINE

Fungicide Applications Improve Corn Silage Feed Efficiency

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Fungicide Applications Improve Corn Silage Feed Efficiency
Phil Cardoso, Dairy Science - University of IllinoisJune is National Dairy MonthSpraying a fungicide on corn in the Midwest has always been a 50/50 proposition related to cost. Half of the time it bumps yield by a couple of bushels and this can sometimes be enough to cover the cost. However, as Todd Gleason Reports, if that corn is going into silage, some new work from the University of Illinois says the improvement in feed efficiency for dairy cattle can pay for the fungicide not just once, but maybe twice. This is simple science to understand…
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2:26 radio self contained
2:00 tv
2:28 tv cg This is simple science to understand, yet it is important to note it seems only to apply to milk production. So, not for beef cattle. Dairy cows fed silage made from corn sprayed with a fungicide give more milk says University of Illinois Dairy Scientist Phil Cardoso (car-DOH-so)Cardoso :32 …less of that material, of …