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Showing posts from 2016

Food Access & Corner Stores | an interview with Amy Funk

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Food Access & Corner Stores | an interview with Amy Funk
Amy Funk, Extension Health & Nutrition - University of Illinois

University of Illinois Extension is working to find ways for corner stores in rural and urban areas to provide more fruits and vegetables. It hopes to resolve issues where populations no longer have access to a general grocery store.

Part II - Kids Use of Technology

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Part II - Kids Use of Technology
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Aaron Ebata, Professor of Social Development & Extension Specialist - University of Illinois

Part I - Just in Time Parenting

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Part I - Just in Time Parenting
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Aaron Ebata, Professor of Social Development & Extension Specialist - University of Illinois

Harrington Seed Destructor Testing

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Harrington Seed Destructor Testing
Adam Davis, USDA Agricultural Research Service - University of Illinois The Harrington Seed Destructor is being tested by the University of Illinois for field level efficacy to control herbicide resistant weeds.

Green Infrastructure & Neighborhoods an interview with Bill Sullivan

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Green Infrastructure & Neighborhoods an interview with Bill Sullivan
Bill Sullivan, Landscape Architect - University of Illinois There is good evidence that suggests small amounts of nature mixed into neighborhoods can make them friendlier places to live.

Green Infrastructure & Stress an interview with Bill Sullivan

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Green Infrastructure & Stress an interview with Bill Sullivan
Bill Sullivan, Landscape Architect - University of Illinois If you are looking for an easy way to release some of the stress in your life, you might think about taking a walk in a park or just buying some house plants.

Gardening | Why Not to Cut Your Perennials this Fall

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Gardening | Why Not to Cut Your Perennials this Fall
Kim Ellson, University of Illinois Extension Educator - Cook County, Illinois
sourceMost gardeners will associate the cutting and removal of perennials and raking of leaves as typical autumn chores. Naturally we want to ensure we are left with a garden that looks tidy and presentable, and we can rest assured that come springtime we will not have to tackle these chores in addition to controlling spring weeds. However removing all this plant material can be fatal for next year’s butterfly population.

Building Your Compost Pile

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Building Your Compost Pile
Duane Friend, Extension Educator - University of Illinois
SourcePut a pile of leaves, a cardboard box and a watermelon in your back yard, exposed to the elements, and they will eventually decompose. How long each takes to break down depends on a number of factors. Backyard composting is a process designed to speed up the breakdown or decomposing of organic materials. Let’s take a closer look at how we manipulate the process and speed things up.

Bring Herb Plants Indoors

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Bring Herb Plants Indoors
sourceHerbs can be attractive as well as tasty in the home says Sandy Mason from University of Illinois Extension.

Don't Let Your Herbs Go to Waste

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Don’t Let Your Herbs Go to Waste
Press ReleaseDrying herbs concentrates the flavors and freezing allows recreation of summer freshness throughout the year.

Hand Washing Prevents Disease

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Hand Washing Prevents Disease
Diane Reinhold, Extension Nutrition & Wellness Educator - University of Illinois
Press ReleaseThink about this: Do you wash your hands after taking out the garbage? Touching your face or hair? Petting the dog? Changing a diaper? Blowing your nose? Sneezing? Before and after putting on a Band-Aid? Before sitting down for a meal? Before and after handling raw meat? After using the bathroom? According to the 2015 annual Healthy Hand Washing Survey, only 66% of Americans report washing their hands after using the bathroom. Washing hands is the simplest and one of the most effective methods in preventing food poisoning. Spending an extra 20–30 seconds in the restroom properly washing hands can prevent hours spent in there later due to food poisoning.

Fall Lawn Care | seeding & over-seeding

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Fall Lawn Care; seeding & over-seeding
Tom Voigt, Extension Turf Grass Specialist - University of Illinois Fall is the best time of year to plant grass says Tom Voigt. He is a turf grass specialist for University of Illinois Extension. Take time this fall to assess your yard, patch dead areas, control weeds, and fertilize.

Dealing with Tree Leaves

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Dealing with Tree Leaves
Rhonda Ferree, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of IllinoisRather than bagging or removing fallen leaves, University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator Rhonda Ferree suggests using them in your yard.“The tree leaves that accumulate in and around your landscape represent a valuable natural resource that can be used to provide a good source of organic matter and nutrients for use in your landscape,” Ferree says. “Leaves contain 50 to 80 percent of the nutrients a plant extracts from the soil and air during the season. Therefore, leaves should be managed and used rather than bagged or burned.”Ferree says adding a 2-inch layer of leaf mulch adds approximately 150 pounds of nitrogen, 20 pounds of phosphorus, and 65 pounds of potassium per acre. Due to natural soil buffering and breakdown in most soil types, leaf mulch also has no significant effect on soil pH. Even oak leaves, which are acid (4.5 to 4.7 pH) when fresh, break down t…

Labor Day (First Monday in September)

Labor Day (First Monday in September)
Source: US Embassy Stockholm Sweden This piece is self contained. It needs no anchor introI’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois…
3:19I’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois Extension with a history of labor day in the United States. It’s adapted from a story found on the United States Embassy to Sweden’s website.Eleven-year-old Peter McGuire sold papers on the street in New York City. He shined shoes and cleaned stores and later ran errands. It was 1863 and his father, a poor Irish immigrant, had just enlisted to fight in the Civil War. Peter had to help support his mother and six brothers and sisters.Many immigrants settled in New York City in the nineteenth century. They found that living conditions were not as wonderful as they had dreamed. Often there were six families crowded into a house made for one family. Thousands of children had to go to work. Working conditions were even worse. Immigrant men, women and children worked in fact…

Marketing a Low Priced High Volume Corn Crop

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Marketing a Low Priced High Volume Corn Crop
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois The price of corn is predicted to stay low this coming year because the size of the crop should be really big. Todd Gleason has more on just how a farmer might go about marketing under such conditions. The numbers aren’t pretty as it relates to this…
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3:00 radio self contained The numbers aren’t pretty as it relates to this year’s corn crop, at least other than the number of bushels in the bin. It should be a great big one, something on the order of 15 billion bushels thinks Darrel Good. Each of those bushels will be worth a lot less than they would have been earlier in the year and now farmers must figure out how to make a lower price and a higher yield result in a sustainable income. The price is too low to call it anything more than sustainable and the crop is too big to put it all in storage says the University of Illinois agricultural economist.Good :49…

Control Mosquito Larvae & Protect Yourself

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Control Mosquito Larvae & Protect Yourself
Phil Nixon, Extension Entomologist - University of Illinois
Daren Bohannan, Mosquito Squad - Athens, Illinois

There are two types of mosquitos that carry disease. Todd Gleason has more on how to control them.





Foggers used by cities and towns…
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Foggers used by cities and towns can be a pretty effective tool for controlling mosquitos. They can even be used around the house. It is best, however, to start with the basics. Both types of disease carrying mosquitos need standing water to hatch. Get rid of it, especially if it is nasty water says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Phil Nixon.

Nixon :37 …the likelyhood of being bitten.
Quote Summary - Those mosquitos are quiet biters, they will sneak up and bite you. They are the ones in the case of the northern house mosquito, transmitting west nile virus and in the case of the Asian tiger mosquito Zika virus, if i…

Peoria 4-H Club to Make Contact with Astronaut

Peoria 4-H Club to Make Contact with Astronaut
Judy Schmidt, 4-H Youth Development - University of Illinois ExtensionA temporary 4-H Club in Peoria Illinois is just getting started on an out-of-this-world journey. Todd Gleason has more on how the club, and maybe your 11–14 year old too, will make contact with the International Space Station at the end of July. 0:57 radio
1:14 radio self containedTonight, through the month of July, 4-H’ers interested in radio, electronics, computers, space, and NASA will meet at the Peoria Riverfront Museum. It’s a club open to any 11–14 year olds around the state says Extension’s Judy Schmidt.Schmidt :30 …that’s when the actual call will happen.Quote Summary - It only meets four Tuesdays and it is in the evening from 6–7:30pm. This might make it more accessible for families that have to work. The first three sessions will be devoted to activities related to HAM radio, Morse code, and satellites. During the last session they’ll plan questions and what …

Marestail Control Prior to Planting

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Marestail Control Prior to Planting
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois
link to article onlineFarmers in Illinois, other states too, are struggling to control glyphosate resistant weeds. Todd Gleason has more on marestail. Marestail can be one of the most challenging…
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1:20 radio self containedMarestail can be one of the most challenging under no-till conditions prior to planting soybeans. More often than not farmers are using a tank mix of glyphosate and 2,4-D (two-four-dee). Sometimes the problem is that the weed is already too big to control, at others says University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager is its just that the 2,4-D isn’t doing the job any better than the glyphosate.Hager :37 …of the tank mix that still has activity. Quote Summary - Well, there are some alternatives that can be used for control of mares tail in a burn down scenario. A product called Sharpen could be included with glyphosate/2,4-D to try to …

What's with all the Yellow Flowers in the Fields

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What’s with all the Yellow Flowers in the Fields
Aaron Hager, Weed Scientist - University of Illinois If you’ve been driving around a good part of the nation you’ll have noticed a lot of yellow flowers in the fields. Todd Gleason has more on this springtime show. Mostly you’ll see these yellow flowers in fields…
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1:37 tv cgYou’ll see the bright color in fields stretching from Texas east to Florida, northward along the Atlantic coast to Virginia, and back west to Nebraska. It’s butterweed says University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager.Hager :14 …these very bright showy yellow flowers.Quote Summary - And butterweed is typically a species that germinates in the fall. It will overwinter as a small rosette of leaves and then about late April to the early part of May it bolts and produces these very bright showy yellow flowers.The bad news for farmers is that because the plant has flowered it is going to get much harder to con…

4-H Robotics Competition @ ILLINOIS

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4-H Robotics Competition @ ILLINOIS
Jessica Zarate (age 14), - Tigers Robotics 4-H Club - Aurora, Illinois
Caleb Widner (age 12), Power Surge Robotics 4-H Club - Normal, Illinois
Ross Schmidgall (age 15), - Power Surge Robotics 4-Club - Normal, Illinois

TV Downloads

Did you know 4-H, that’s the world’s largest youth organization, is into robots. It is, and so are kids. Todd Gleason has more from an amazing robotics competition held in mid-April on the University of Illinois campus in Champaign, Illinois.

How many kids do you think might show up…
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Soybeans, the Switch is On - TV

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Soybeans, the Switch is On - TV
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisEver since USDA released the Prospective Plantings report March 31st, many have been wondering if farmers will decide to switch a few corn acres to soybeans. The higher price of that crop, as Todd Gleason reports, seems to make this more likely.Farmers told USDA in March they would plant about 82.2…
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2:33 tv cg Farmers told USDA in March they would plant about 82.2 million acres of soybeans this season. This is one percent less than last year, and a million acres or so less than the trade had really expected. Prices have rallied since then and University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good thinks that million acres could be back in play, but that it won’t really change much.Good :33 …alter the supply expectation very much.Quote Summary - I tend to think there will be some modest switching given the price reaction we’ve had since that report was released. Soybeans …

Irwin & Good Explore El Niño Year USA Yields

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Irwin & Good Explore El Niño Year USA Yields
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois El Niño can have an impact on summer weather in the United States. Work at the University of Illinois points to poorer crop yields the summer following a strong El Niño that begins to fade late in the previous calendar year.

Irwin & Good Develop New Price Forecasting Mode

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Irwin & Good Develop New Price Forecasting Model
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois agricultural economists have developed a new price forecasting model for corn and soybeans. Todd Gleason talks with Scott Irwin about the model and how it reflects the “new era” of commodity prices.

Nafziger on 2016 Growing Season

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Nafziger on 2016 Growing Season
Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist - University of IllinoisUp next Univeristy of Illinois Extension Agronomist talks with Todd Gleason about the amount of nitrogen available to the corn plant during the growing season, how that fertilizer faired over the warm wet winter months, when to plant corn, and if it is ok to plant soybeans earlier than normal.

USDA March 31 Report Day React - interview with Darrel Good

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USDA March 31 Report Day React - interview with Darrel Good
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

Up next Todd Gleason talks with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good about today’s Prospective Plantings and Grain Stocks reports.

6:22 run time

Targeting the Middle of the Chain

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Targeting the Middle of the Chain
Sam Riskers, Administrator - USDA Rural Business-Cooperative Service Sara Eckhouse, Chief of Staff - USDA Agricultural Marketing Service Secretary Vilsack has identified strengthening local and regional food systems as one of the four pillars of USDA’s commitment to rural economic development. Part of this focus in on the middle of the supply chain. Todd Gleason reports USDA is helping to make investments in this space. Those local food systems investments aren’t all…
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3:07 radio self contained Those local food systems investments aren’t all targeted at producers, or the people who raise food. Some of it says Sam Rikkers, the Administrator for USDA’s Rural Business-Cooperative Service, are aimed at the people in the middle of the supply chain.Rikkers :31 …to have markets for their goods.Quote Summary - Well here is what we know. We know at USDA that a huge part of the folks we work for, particularly at Rural Development, are the…

USDA Toolkit Designed to help Pitch Local Foods

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USDA Toolkit Designed to help Pitch Local Foods
Sara Eckhouse, Chief of Staff - USDA Agricultural Marketing Service The United States Department of Agriculture has been moving to support local food production throughout the nation. The agency is focusing on bringing new farmers and businesses into rural and urban areas. To that end, as Todd Gleason reports, it has developed an online toolkit entrepreneurs can use to help pitch their ideas to lenders and local governments. The Local Food System Toolkit was developed…
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2:50 radio self contained The Local Food System Toolkit was developed by the Agricultural Marketing Service or A-M-S along with Colorado State University. It is supposed to help communities reliably evaluate the economic impact of investing in local and regional food systems says the Chief of Staff for AMS Sara Eckhouse.Eckhouse :40 …pillars for economic revitalization in rural communities.Quote Summary - The point is to really understand the econom…

2016 TPP Ratification Extremely Important

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2016 TPP Ratification Extremely Important
Tom Vilsack, United States Secretary of Agriculture - Washington, D.C.The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture continues to call on congress to ratify the Trans Pacific Partnership. Tom Vilsack says it is extremely important that the 12 nation trade pact be approved this year. Vilsack :31 …with commodity prices where they are today.Quote Summary - There are many reasons for that, but for agriculture it is about increasing market opportunities in Asia. Which is a fast growing market, particularly for our high value products. We are going to see significant tariff reduction and elimination on American agricultural products. Farm Bureau has proposed, and suggested, and studied this. They believe it will increase exports by over 5 billion dollars, and increase U.S. farm income by over 4 billion dollars. All of which I think is extremely important, especially with commodity prices where they are today.Tariffs on almost all U.S. farm pr…

Fewer Hogs and Higher Prices

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Fewer Hogs and Higher Prices
Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension Agricultural EconomistThe last Hogs and Pigs report is good news for pork producers. Todd Gleason reports it showed fewer hogs are being raised in the United States and that, in turn, should boost prices. Pork producers say they’ll reduce the size…
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2:04 radio self containedPork producers say they’ll reduce the size of their breeding herds. Or at least that’s what the latest Hogs and Pigs report showed. Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt says farrowing should begin slow this spring and summer. However, right now, the breeding herd is as big as it was at this same time last year. Still, it’s a pattern of change and reduction says Hurt.Hurt :20 …that has seemingly has now ended.Quote Summary - The herd had been in an expansion phase from the last half of 2014 through 2015. That expansion was largely because of record high profits due to baby pig losses from PED. That expansion phase seeming…

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture - interview with Tom Vilsack

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U.S. Secretary of Agriculture - interview with Tom Vilsack
Tom Vilsack, United States Secretary of Agriculture - Washington, D.C. Up next… U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack has a discussion about policy making news in Washington, D.C. including the TPP, the just announced Local Foods Toolkit, and GMO labeling laws. 10:18 self contained

USDA New Farmers & Businesses - Good Food Festival Interview

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USDA New Farmers & Businesses - Good Food Festival Interview
Sara Eckhouse, Chief of Staff - USDA Agricultural Marketing Service
Sam Riskers, Administrator - USDA Rural Business-Cooperative ServiceThe United States Department of Agriculture has been moving to support local food production throughout the nation. Todd Gleason has more on how and why the agency is focusing on bringing new farmers and businesses into rural and urban areas.

USDA Offers New Toolkit to Assess Economic Impact of Local Foods

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USDA Offers New Toolkit to Assess Economic Impact of Local Foods
Tom Vilsack, United States Secretary of Agriculture - Washington, D.C.Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has unveiled a new resource to help communities and businesses evaluate the economic benefits of investing in local food systems. The announcement was made Thursday to those attending the Good Food Festival and Conference in Chicago.Vilsack :35 …USDA to provide support across the board for this effort. Quote Summary - It is really designed to give us the ability to work with all of you. So that you can make the case to local government officials, to investors, to those interested in the good food movement, that this is a profitable venture, and that this makes economic sense. We think this toolkit makes that case more strongly and with better data which should lead to continued investment in the good food movement. It is a continuation of our effort at USDA to provide support across the board for th…

Good Food Festival & Conference | with Zach Grant

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Good Food Festival & Conference | with Zach Grant
Zach Grant, Local Food Systems & Small Farms Educator - University of Illinois Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of this week the University of Illinois Chicago Forum will host the Good Food Festival & Conference. It is all about raising, marketing, and eating locally grown fruits, vegetables, and meats. Todd Gleason has more with Zach Grant from University of Illinois Extension.

Why Urban Agriculture | with Zach Grant

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Why Urban Agriculture | with Zach Grant
Zach Grant, Local Food Systems & Small Farms Educator - University of Illinois Extension systems across the United States are targeting the development of local food systems around large and small communities. Todd Gleason has more on the reasons why with University of Illinois Extension Local Food Systems & Small Farms Educator Zach Grant.

Any Information in Mid-Year Soybean Stocks Estimate

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Any Information in Mid-Year Soybean Stocks Estimate
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisNext week (Thursday March 31) USDA will release the quarterly Grain Stocks report. Typically it is overshadowed by the Prospective Plantings report released on the same date. However, as Todd Gleason reports, it occasionally provides a surprise to the trade. For soybeans, the stocks estimate is often very near…
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4:10 radio self contained For soybeans, the stocks estimate is often very near the level expected by the market says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good. This is because we generally know how many soybeans are used at any point during year based off the magnitude of the domestic crush and the exports, both of which are tallied either by the government, the industry, or the two combined. The stocks estimate, says Good, really does indicated the magnitude of seed, feed, and residual use of soybeans in the previous quarter. U…

Are Soybeans-After-Soybeans Profitable | with Gary Schnitkey

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Are Soybeans-After-Soybeans Profitable | with Gary Schnitkey
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Economist - University of IllinoisLow commodity prices have farmers around the nation considering a different crop rotation. Some have been wondering if it might be more profitable to plant soybeans after soybeans this year. University of Illinois Extension Economist Gary Schnitkey addressed the issue on the FarmDocDaily website and told Todd Gleason farmers in northern and southern Illinois might consider the option.

Earlier Spring is Lawn Patching Time | with Rhonda Ferree

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Earlier Spring is Lawn Patching Time | with Rhonda Ferree
Rhonda Ferree, Extension Educator, Horticulture - University of IllinoisSpring is a good time to do early season lawn care. University of Illinois Extension Educator Rhonda Ferree tells Todd Gleason you might need to address some crabgrass in the your lawn or to patch some areas.

Grain Stocks & Prospective Plantings Reports Previews

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Grain Stocks & Prospective Plantings Reports Previews
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisUSDA will officially kick off the new year for the spring planted crops when it releases two reports on the last day of the month. Todd Gleason has this preview from the University of Illinois.The Grain Stocks and Prospective Plantings reports…
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2:30 radio self containedThe Grain Stocks and Prospective Plantings reports will be released March 31st. Darrel Good says both will help set the tone of the trade for corn and soybeans going forward. Good :33 …the potential size of the upcoming crops. Quote Summary - The Stocks report will be modestly important as it always is for corn. It will give us a reading on how fast we are feeding last year’s crop, but the real information will be in the Prospective Plantings report. It can be a mixed bag. This is because we all know actual plantings deviate from intentions. Certainly, though, when we see the Marc…

WASDE a Shade Friendly

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WASDE a Shade Friendly
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisUSDA’s March World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report didn’t really change much, still that seems a shade friendlier than before to University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good.

Crop Insurance Decisions & ARC County Payments

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Crop Insurance Decisions & ARC County Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Farmers have until March 15th to make crop insurance decisions related to this years spring planted crops. Todd Gleason has more on what corn and soybean producers in the Midwest might consider. The two also discuss the potential ARC County payments to be made on last fall’s harvest.

Starting Herb Seeds Indoors

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Starting Herb Seeds Indoors
Nancy Kreith, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of IllinoisURBANA, Ill. – Herbs are popular in many gardens, but it can be expensive to buy and transplant mature plants. That’s why University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator Nancy Kreith recommends starting herbs from seed indoors as spring approaches. March is a good time to begin.Thyme, rosemary, basil, sage, chives, and tarragon are good candidates for starting indoors. Many of these plants have very fine seeds and require a long germination period. If started early in March, they can be ready to transplant into the garden in mid to late May, depending on the region. Refer to Illinois State Water Survey for average frost free dates in your region at: www.isws.illinois.edu.To start herb seeds indoors, use a peat-based soil-less seed-starting mix in a 3- to 4-inch-deep container or seed-starting flat with drainage holes. Pre-moisten the mix with water until …

How to Move Plants Back Outside

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How to Move Plants Back Outside
Bruce Black, Extension Horticulture Educator - University of IllinoisURBANA, Ill. – Plants, like people and pets, prefer a particular environment to perk up and be prosperous, according to University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator Bruce J. Black.“In the spring, when you are ready to take your plants outside for the growing season, the plants are likely to suffer damage if they are not acclimated correctly to outdoor conditions,” explains Black. “Overwintered plants have become accustomed to indoor conditions and, like humans, adapt slowly to rapid changes in environment.”Environmental factors such as light, wind, and temperature are some examples of changes to keep in mind. Each factor causes a different physiological response in the plant.“Natural light intensity can decrease by up to 50 percent during the winter,” Black says. “Setting plants outdoors in direct sun without acclimating them to the increased lighti…

About NCSA's Blue Waters Super Computer

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About NCSA’s Blue Waters Super Computer
Scott Wilkin, NCSA Director Economic & Societal Impact - Univeristy of Illinois
Blue Waters Website
view Todd Gleason’s photosTodd Gleason tours the National Center for Supercomputing Applications Blue Waters facility on the University of Illinois campus.

The Meaning of Flowers

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The Meaning of Flowers
Source ArticleUp next… have you been wondering what flowers to give to your sweetheart, and just exactly what your choice is supposed to say to them? Todd Gleason has and he found an answer online from University of Illinois Extension’s Rhonda Ferree.

Annie's Project Interview with Ruth Hambleton

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Annie’s Project Interview with Ruth Hambleton
Ruth Hambleton, President Annie’s Project - Ashley, IllinoisUp next Todd Gleason from University of Illinois Extension explores Annie’s Project. It is a series of classes targeted to women wanting to learn more about record keeping and the farm.

Laughing, Learning, & Singing with Chili Peppers

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Laughing, Learning, & Singing with Chili Peppers
Chuck Voigt (retired), Extension Horticulture - University of Illinois Susan Belsinger, Culinary Herbalist - Brookfield, Maryland Sue Arnold, Central Indiana Herb Society - Indianapolis, IndianadownloadsOn a bright snowy Saturday in Urbana, Illinois about 300 herb enthusiasts gathered for the 17th time. Todd Gleason has more on the annual Herb Day.Herb Day is kind of a party lead by Chuck Voigt…
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2:29 tv cgHerb Day is kind of a party lead by Chuck Voigt. He just retired from University of Illinois Extension. He’s always smiling and singing. Nat Sound SingingChuck invites his friends to come to the “party” and then gets people to pay to see them, but for oh so much more. Voigt :15 …such a good time. That’s been the goal.Quote Summary - I like to think that is knowledge that is presented in a way that is so much fun, that it is like you are going to school, but you don’t know it…

Thinking Critically About How Organic Foods Sell

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Thinking Critically About How Organic Foods Sell
Brenna Ellison, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisOrganic food products are sold widely in the United States. The context in which these products are sold give them unique attributes from the consumer perspective. Todd Gleason has more with a University of Illinois agricultural economist on virtues, vices, and shelf space of organic foods.

Transitioning to Organic Grain Production

Transitioning to Organic Grain Production-playlist

MarketMaker to Connect Illinois Farmers Markets

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MarketMaker to Connect Illinois Farmers Markets
Janie Maxwell, Executive Director - Illinois Farmers Market Association
Dar Knipe, National Market Maker - Riverside ResearchA University of Illinois developed online database and marketing tool for farmers has matured into an independent business. MarketMaker is now working to better connect food to consumers through the Illinois Farmers Market Association.

Ag Policy & the Bourbon Trail

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Ag Policy & the Bourbon Trail
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois http://policymatters.illinois.edu/holiday-spirits-notes-from-the-bourbon-trail/ http://kybourbontrail.comUniversity of Illinois agricultural policy specialist Jonathan Coppess traveled the Kentucky Bourbon Trail and thought about how agricultural policy brought it into being.

Using Social Media to Market Locally Grown Foods

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Using Social Media to Market Locally Grown Foods
Andy Larson, Local Food Systems - University of Illinois ExtensionUniversity of Illinois Extension Educator Andy Larson talks about using social media like Facebook and Twitter to build a clientele base for locally grown foods and Know-Your-Farmer campaigns.

Farmer Ken Steffen Uses Social Media

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Farmer Ken Steffen Uses Social Media
Ken Steffen, Steffen Melon Farms - Tangier, Indiana