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Showing posts from September, 2015

Limited Pork Expansion

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Limited Pork Expansion
Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist The nation’s hog farmers have done a nice of job of not over reacting to last year’s record profits. Todd Gleason reports they’ve limited their expansion plans and consequently should see a good bottomline again for this year, and maybe next.For all of 2015, pork supplies are expected to be…
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3:14 radio self containedFor all of 2015, pork supplies are expected to be seven percent higher than in 2014. That year the price of pork averaged $76 mostly because the PED virus wreaked havoc on the industry. This years supplies have been farm more stable and supplies for 2016 should only be about one percent higher than in 2015. Hog prices are expected to average about $51 on a live weight basis for this year. Current projections for 2016 are for a similar average price and it means hog farmers will make money says Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. Hurt :29 …that further expansio…

Decreasing 2016 Cash Rents on Professionally Managed Farmland

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Decreasing 2016 Cash Rents on Professionally Managed Farmland
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisCash rents on professionally-managed farmland are set to decrease next year. That’s the conclusion of a survey in the state of Illinois. Todd Gleason has more…Each year, the Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers…
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2:17 tv cg Each year, the Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers asks its members how much, on average, they’re collecting for cash rent for the current year, and their expectations for next year. The survey provides a really good indicator of rents on professionally-managed farmland says Gary Schnitkey from the University of Illinois.Schnitkey :16 …down $32 from the 2015 rent.Quote Summary - We looked at that and for excellent quality farmland, 190 plus bushels per acre, the farm manages said rents in 2016 would be $318 per acre which is down $32…

How to Read the FSA Acreage Dump

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How to Read the FSA Acreage Dump
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisToday (Wednesday September 16, 2015) the Farm Service Agency released a new set of numbers. While these are preliminary figures of acreage and crops, Todd Gleason reports they do offer a hint of things to come in future official USDA estimates. First, it is really important to understand these numbers are raw…
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3:10 tv CG First, it is really important to understand these numbers are raw and come with no explanation. They are simply a monthly dump of the aggregated acreage figures reported to the FSA by those participating in federal farm programs. Participation requires them to report the number of planted, failed, and prevented plant acres of each program crop. These numbers are updated by FSA from August to January. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good explains how the raw numbers make their way into the official U…

$100,000,000 of Blender Pumps for 21 States

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$100,000,000 of Blender Pumps for 21 States
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack
Paul Jeschke, Farmer & Illinois Corn Marketing Board - Mazon, IllinoisThe U.S. Secretary of Agriculture held nothing back on the University of Illinois campus yesterday (Thursday Sept 10) when he talked about bio fuels and blender pumps for 21 states. Todd Gleason has more from the U of I’s Energy Farm just south of the Urbana-Champaign campus.The Secretary of Ag came to the U of I campus…
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2:13 radio self containedThe Secretary of Ag came to the U of I campus to talk about two things. The importance or agricultural research and blender pumps. However, he started his press conference with a shot over the bow of the oil industry. He thinks it is fearful of competition from farmers. Competition that Tom Vilsack says is making gasoline more affordable. Vilsack :22 …to create job opportunities in rural places. Quote Summary - They know it is reducing the cost of gasoline to con…

2016 Cash Rents May Need to Drop $100

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2016 Cash Rents May Need to Drop $100
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisFarm income this year is going to be dramatically lower than in the past. Next year doesn’t look any better even on highly productive central Illinois soils. Todd Gleason reports farmers must cut costs to survive, and that cash rents may need to come down by as much as one-hundred-dollars per acre. Let’s start with this year’s income from an…
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2:34 tv CGLet’s start with this year’s income from an acre of corn. Today a central Illinois farmer that raises 200 bushel corn can expect, on average, to be paid $3.65 for each bushel. That’s an income of $730 per acre, plus any government payments - let’s make it $800 even. These are the numbers being used by Gary Schnitkey at the University of Illinois.Schnitkey :41 …just be in the same ballpark of breaking even.Quote Summary - We have $800 of revenue, and we have been running …

Labor Day (First Monday in September)

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Labor Day (First Monday in September)
Source: US Embassy Stockholm Sweden
This piece is self contained. It needs no anchor introI’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois…
3:19I’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois Extension with a history of Labor Day in the United States. It’s adapted from a story found on the United States Embassy to Sweden’s website.Eleven-year-old Peter McGuire sold papers on the street in New York City. He shined shoes and cleaned stores and later ran errands. It was 1863 and his father, a poor Irish immigrant, had just enlisted to fight in the Civil War. Peter had to help support his mother and six brothers and sisters.Many immigrants settled in New York City in the nineteenth century. They found that living conditions were not as wonderful as they had dreamed. Often there were six families crowded into a house made for one family. Thousands of children had to go to work. Working conditions were even worse. Immigrant men, women and children w…

Lower Pork Costs Driven by Lower Meal Costs

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Lower Pork Costs Driven by Lower Meal Costs
Chris Hurt, Agricultural Economist - Purdue University ExtensionThe retail price of a pork chop is getting cheaper. Todd Gleason reports the price of soybean meal is one of the reasons for the decline. Soybean meal is an important but an “economically” secondary feed… 3:47 radio 4:06 radio self containedSoybean meal is an important but an “economically” secondary feed ingredient in hog diets compared to corn. Purdue University Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt thinks soybean meal costs, as a feed ingredient, have been about 22 percent of the total costs of raising hogs over the past decade. This compares to 32 percent for corn. In recent years soybean meal has been high priced. For the calendar years of 2012, 2013 and 2014 USDA reports that Decatur, Illinois high-protein meal has had annual averages between $440 and $480 per ton. But with a record U.S. soybean crop in the fall of 2014 and with the second largest crop likely comi…