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Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Use Multiple Effective Herbicides to Control Weeds

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Use Multiple Effective Herbicides to Control Weeds
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois

Going forward farmers should think more about using multiple herbicides that will control resistant weeds than simply using a single control method. Todd Gleason has the terms of this statement.

University of Illinois researchers pulled more that 500 site…
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University of Illinois researchers pulled more that 500 site years worth of data from a retail applicator to see how resistant weeds developed in farmers’ fields. What they found is this says U of I Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager… slowing the development and spread of resistant weeds happened best when a farmer used several different effective herbicides to control the weed every time an application was made. Here’s Hager.

Hager :20 …in tank mixtures when we make post emergence applications.

Quote Summary - What the results are suggesting is that using a residual herbicide can certainly be effective and helpful, but we really need to use multiple effective herbicides for each application. We also need to use multiple effective herbicides in tank mixtures when we make post emergence applications.

Here’s how farmers should consider applying this knowledge to their operations as it relates to the new soybean herbicide trait products entering the market.

Hager :37 …multiple effective herbicides every time we make an application.

Quote Summary - Really, here’s what our results are suggesting. Simply putting a residual down and then following up with a pre-mix combination of glyphosate with either 2–4D or dicamba, if the glyphosate effectiveness is already lost to that field, is not doing what we should be doing in using multiple effective herbicides every time we make an application. So, would there possibly be a third tank mix component we could include in a two way mix of dicamba glyphosate or 2–4D glyphosate if glyphosate effectiveness has already been compromised in that field.

Likewise, says Hager, a farmer should consider how many different modes or mechanisms of action can be made when the soil residual herbicide is applied prior to planting.