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Showing posts from May, 2015

Use Multiple Effective Herbicides to Control Weeds

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Use Multiple Effective Herbicides to Control Weeds
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of IllinoisGoing forward farmers should think more about using multiple herbicides that will control resistant weeds than simply using a single control method. Todd Gleason has the terms of this statement.University of Illinois researchers pulled more that 500 site…
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2:00 radio self contained University of Illinois researchers pulled more that 500 site years worth of data from a retail applicator to see how resistant weeds developed in farmers’ fields. What they found is this says U of I Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager… slowing the development and spread of resistant weeds happened best when a farmer used several different effective herbicides to control the weed every time an application was made. Here’s Hager.Hager :20 …in tank mixtures when we make post emergence applications.Quote Summary - What the results are suggesting is that using a residual herbici…

Slowing Herbicide Resistance Evolution

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Slowing Herbicide Resistance Evolution
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of IllinoisWeed scientists from the Univesity of Illinois have been trying help farmers manage the inevitable development of herbicide resistance for more than two decades. Todd Gleason reports there is now proof which advice actually works. Plants are quite capable of evolving…
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2:54 radio self contained Plants are quite capable of evolving. Weeds like waterhemp have evolved. These weeds are resistant to some of the herbicides used to control them. It was thought, by many weed scientists, this evolution would take place much more quickly with the overuse of any particular active ingredient. So, extension specialists like Aaron Hager from the University of Illinois promoted the rotation of herbicides and modes of action. They didn’t have proof this would work, but now they do with qualifications.Hager :47 …tank mixed herbicides every time an application is made. Quote Summar…

RFS Matters for Biodiesel

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RFS Matters for Biodiesel
Scott Irwin, Ag Economist - University of Illinois

The United States Environmental Protection Agency now says it will not update the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates until November. Todd Gleason reports this year’s RFS, no matter when it is released, is really important to the biodiesel industry.

More often than not when the federal government’s…
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More often than not when the federal government’s Renewable Fuel Standard is discussed people are thinking about corn based ethanol or other feedstocks that can produce ethanol. However, when U.S. EPA finally releases the RFS mandates it may be the biodiesel industry that pays the most attention says University of Illinois Ag Economist Scott Irwin.
Irwin :36 …to find out what happens.
Quote Summary - The industry for which the RFS is really a life or death matter is biodiesel. Because if the EPA would choose to go back to the RFS statutory level ma…

Poultry Research & the University of Illinois Campus

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Poultry Research & the University of Illinois Campus
Ken Koelkebeck, Extension Poultry Specialist - University of Illinois Illinois is NOT known as a key chicken production state. Regardless of this fact, the state’s Land Grant university is a primary player in the poultry industry. Todd Gleason has this review of ILLINOIS’ applied research prowess and its relationship to the state’s agricultural feed production history. Farmers in the Prairie State raise corn and soybeans…
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2:33 tv CG Farmers in the Prairie State raise corn and soybeans and they do it really well. These crops are used to feed animals and birds; chickens. Lots of chickens, but most of them are reared in other states. Much of the feed comes from Illinois and so does the research that supports the nation’s poultry industry says Ken Koelkebeck (coal-keg-beck) from the University of Illinois.Koelkebeck :33 …that came out color sexed males or females. Quote Summar…