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Showing posts from 2015

U of I Extension Food Safety Training for School Lunch Program

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U of I Extension Food Safety Training for School Lunch Program
Jennifer McCaffrey, Family and Consumer Sciences - University of Illinois Extension

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The Illinois State Board of Education has awarded four and half million dollars to University of Illinois Extension. The money will be used to help with the state’s school lunch program. Todd Gleason has more on how Extension plans to improve health and nutrition for nearly two million school aged kids.

The State Board of Education will use…
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The State Board of Education will use University of Illinois Extension to provide foodservice training and education to about 4000 school lunchrooms. Family & Consumer Sciences educators will create and deliver training on child nutrition standards and the cafeteria environment. The four-and-a-half-milion-dollar, three year effort starts in January with a monthly webinar series. A web training port…

Ethanol Production & 2016 Corn Consumption Prospects

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Ethanol Production & 2016 Corn Consumption Prospects
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisDownloadsCommodity traders are generally thinking last week’s EPA RFS rule making will cause more bushels of corn to be turned into ethanol next year. Todd Gleason reports University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good is more doubtful.Let’s start by building a corn for ethanol baseline…
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4:33 radio self contained Let’s start by building a corn for ethanol baseline to see why. The EIA, the U.S. Energy Information Administration, says U.S. production of fuel ethanol in 2014 totaled 14 billion 313 million gallons. That was about a billion gallons more than in 2013, and nearly 400 million gallons more than the record setting year of 2011. So, 14.313 billion gallons of ethanol were produced in 2014. During the first nine months of this year, writes Darrel Good on the Farm Doc Daily website, EIA shows production 3.6 percent larger than durin…

4 Step Weed Control Plan for Corn or Soybeans

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4 Step Weed Control Plan for Corn or Soybeans
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - Univeristy of Illinois

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Since the 1960’s farmers have been using herbicides to control weeds. Frankly, herbicide formulations haven’t changed that much and the weeds have managed to find ways to adapt. Todd Gleason has this four step plan from the Univesity of Illinois to control them in corn or soybeans.

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Some weeds have become resistant to the herbicides farmers use to control them. Others have lengthened their germination period, emerging later in the season, avoiding early spring control methods. University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has a four step plan farmers can use to maintain a competitive edge in corn or soybeans. It starts by planting into a weed free seedbed.

Hager :22 …vegetation without adequate control ahead of time.
Quote Summary - It is easy to achieve a weed free seedbed by either re…

EPA's RFS Decision will push Biodiesel Usage

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EPA’s RFS Decision will push Biodiesel Usage
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisDownloadsThe United States Environmental Protection Agency is beginning to comply with the letter of the law as it pertains to biofuels. Todd Gleason reports this could be a boon for biodiesel made from soybeans.2:14 radio
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EPA this week announced it would force oil companies to find more ways to use renewable fuels. This is something the oil industry has resisted saying it was too difficult to use much more than the ten percent ethanol blend already found in gasoline. This is called the blend wall and is actually less than the total number of gallons of renewable fuels congress mandated be used in 2016 when it originally wrote the law. Since not all cars can burn greater than 10 percent ethanol in gasoline, and the amount of gasoline used in the United States is less than the renewable f…

An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments

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An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
FarmDocDaily Source ArticleDownloadsFarmers and their bankers can get a jump on just how much income to expect from the ARC County program next fall. Todd Gleason has more on how NASS county yields can be used to anticipate the payments.Farm income is down dramatically…
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2:43 radio self contained Farm income is down dramatically. It means farmers will be going to bankers for production loans this winter. Those loans will be used to plant next season’s crops. The bankers will be looking for every clue they can to help them make solid lending decisions. One source of income they’ll want to calculate comes from the farm programs. However, the ARC County payments won’t be figured until the fall. It is possible to estimate these payments by substituting NASS county yields for the FSA computed yields says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitke…

FEFO - An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments

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FEFO - An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe Farm Service Agency (FSA) computes county yields used in calculating Agricultural Risk Coverage—County Option (ARC-CO) payments. FSA yields differ from county yields released by the National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS). While different, NASS yields will be useful in estimating 2015 ARC-CO payments when they are released in late February 2016. FSA likely will not release FSA yields until autumn of 2016. Many farmers, lenders, and landowners will desire payment estimates before the autumn. In many cases, NASS yields can be used to arrive at realistic estimates of ARC-CO payments. To aid in ARC-CO payment estimation, the average differences between FSA and NASS yields are reported in this article for corn in Illinois counties.

Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014

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Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisDownloadsThe price of seed corn has gone up a lot over the years. Not as much as the price of farmland, but as Todd Gleason reports, it is no distant second. 2:53 radio
3:03 radio self contained Over the eight years from 2006 to 2014 the per acre cost of seed corn increased 164 percent. The really big increases came in the first four years, ’06, ’07, ’08, and ’09…which happens to correspond with the primary the build out of the ethanol industry in the United States. Gary Schnitkey thought these numbers, pulled from the state’s aggregated FBFM - that stands for Farm Business Farm Management - record keeping service were pretty interesting. So, he decided to look at the increase and think about the seed corn industry. Schnitkey :40 …we’ve had some pretty large increase since then. Quote Summary - It’s interesting. Between 1995 and 2006 seed cost increased at an average annual ra…

Four Step Weed Control Plan for 2016

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Four Step Weed Control Plan for 2016
Aaron Hager, Weed Scientist - University of Illinois
VOICER Farmers battling herbicide resistant weeds are running out of control options. University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has this four step recommendation.Really a good four step plan for weed control… 2:00 radio & tv
…very significant challenges later in the growing season.Aaron Hager is an Extension Weed Scientist at the University of Illinois. You may read detailed information of his four step weed control plan online. Search for “bulletin” and “University of Illinois”.SoundCloud Embed
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Sideways Price Pattern to Continue for Corn

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Sideways Price Pattern to Continue for Corn
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe price of corn has been choppy, but trading sideways. Todd Gleason reports it is a trend likely to continue for sometime. USDA’s forecast of this year’s corn crop has…
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1:59 radio self contained USDA’s forecast of this year’s corn crop has been very stable since it was first made. It started at 168.8 bushels to the acre in August, dropped to 167 and half in September, and then rebounded to 168 last month. The total production forecast declined by only 131 million bushels, slightly less than one percent, from August to October. In addition, the USDA estimate of September 1 stocks of old crop corn came in almost exactly as expected. New yield and production forecasts will be released on November 10. Changes from the October forecasts are expected to be modest says Darrel Good. So, there’s not been much happening on the supply front to move the price of corn a…

Farmland Prices and Farm Solvency Then & Now

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Farmland Prices and Farm Solvency Then & Now
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Years of low commodity prices, and losses on the farm, have some wondering whether the agricultural boom-bust cycle of the 1970’s and 80’s is repeating itself. The balance sheets, as Todd Gleason reports, say probably not. There are some big differences between the farm crisis…
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There are some big differences between the farm crisis of the 1980’s and the current situation in middle America. Then, as now, commodity price had slumped after soaring for a few years. The price of farmland had skyrocketed, too, just like now. However, unlike today interest rates were high and farmers were deep in debt when the price of farmland finally bottomed 42 percent below its high. Gary Schnitkey wanted to know what would happen today in that kind of worst case scenario. So he ran the numbers. S…

World Health Organization Oversteps with Red Meat Assertion

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World Health Organization Oversteps with Red Meat Assertion
John Erdman, Food Scientist & Professor Emeritus - University of IllinoisWhile it has been known for quite sometime that processed meats… things like bacon and sausage and jerky… might slightly increase your risk of colorectal cancer. A professor emeritus of food science at the University of Illinois says the World Health Organization may have thrown up too much of a red flag on them, and certainly did so on red meat.Erdman :19 …overstep their bounds a little bit on that. Quote Summary - The W-H-O report then went into the red meats, the unprocessed meats, and suggested there is an increased risk of certain cancers. I think they did overstep their bounds a little bit on that. The W-H-O report admits it was unable to say the 800 studies they looked at correlated eating red meat with the development of cancer. The increased risk of contracting colorectal cancer from eating processed meat every day, puts …

Interview with Illinois Professor Emeritus on W-H-O Red Meat Release

Interview with Illinois Professor Emeritus on W-H-O Red Meat Release
John Erdman, Food Scientist & Professor Emeritus - University of IllinoisDiscussion with Food Science Professor Emeritus John Erdman about the World Health Organization’s red meat, processed meat as carcinogens 2015 release.

Crop Insurance Undercut by Budget Deal

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SPOT NEWS VOICER
Crop Insurance Undercut by Budget Deal Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois The federal government is expected to vote on the budget deal, maybe as soon as today. If it goes through unchanged one of the safety net programs for agriculture, crop insurance, will most definitely fall to the axe says University of Illinois Ag Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess. Coppess :11 …getting changes at this hour is an uphill climb.Quote Summary - I’ve heard that this saves about three billion dollars and that it is part of a big budget package. Getting changes at this hour is an uphill climb.Coppess is in Washington, D.C. today. He says the deal would not eliminate crop insurance, but might force premiums higher, and shrink the number of places capable of providing it.

Crop Insurance S.R.A. Capped at 8.9% Under Budget Deal

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Crop Insurance S.R.A. Capped at 8.9% Under Budget Deal
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois

The federal government is expected to vote on the budget deal, maybe as soon as today. If it goes through unchanged one of the safety net programs from agriculture will most definitely fall to the axe. Todd Gleason has more on what will happen to crop insurance.

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University of Illinois Ag Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess is in Washington, D.C. He says the deal would require the Obama Administration to renegotiate the Standard Reinsurance Agreement or S.R.A. and take 3 billion dollars out of the crop insurance program over a ten year period.

Coppess :44 …getting changes at this hour is an uphill climb.
Quote Summary - And within that renegotiation put a cap if you will, or a limit on the rate of return for crop insurance companies at a very low ra…

SPOT NEWS: World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat "Probably" Carcinogenic

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SPOT NEWS
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World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat “Probably” Carcinogenic

Red meat causes cancer. That’s what the headlines are saying, but as you’ll hear from Todd Gleason the W-H-O study doesn’t quite come to that conclusion.

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Monday (October 26, 2015) the World Health Organization suggested it would be good to limit the amount of red and processed meat we consume. There has been quite a firestorm in the media declaring “red meat causes cancer”.

That’s not actually what the W-H-O said in its press release. It actually classified the consumption of red meat as “probably” carcinogenic to humans. Going on to point out that processed meats, things like ham & sausage or hotdogs & corned beef, if eaten every day does increase the chance of getting colorectal cancer by 18%.

Again - red meat, steaks, pork chops and the like, “probably carcinogenic” but …

FEATURE - World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat "Probably" Carcinogenic

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FEATURE
World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat “Probably” CarcinogenicRed meat causes cancer. That’s what the headlines are saying, but as you’ll hear from Todd Gleason the W-H-O study doesn’t quite come to that conclusion.Monday (October 26, 2015) the World Health Organization suggested…
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3:09 radio self contained Monday (October 26, 2015) the World Health Organization suggested it would be good to limit the amount of red and processed meat we consume. There has been quite a firestorm in the media declaring “red meat causes cancer”. That’s not actually what the W-H-O said in its press release. It actually classified the consumption of red meat as “probably” carcinogenic to humans. Going on to point out that processed meats, things like ham & sausage or hotdogs & corned beef, if eaten every day does increase the chance of getting colorectal cancer by 18%. Again - red meat, steaks, pork chops and the like, “probably carcinogenic” but the 800 studie…

Beef: High Prices Cure High Prices

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Beef: High Prices Cure High Prices
Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist The adage that the cure for high prices is “High Prices” sure looks right for the beef market this year. Todd Gleason has more with Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. The price of beef cattle reached a record high…
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4:05 radio self contained The price of beef cattle reached a record high of about $170 for a hundred pounds in late 2014 and early 2015. It has plummeted since, dropping 50 bucks. Interestingly, hogs took a similar nose dive from mid-last year to this year and it seems likely the price of eggs, which skyrocketed last spring because of Avian Influenza, is destined for the same fate. Or so thinks Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. He says it is all part of agriculture’s boom/bust cycle.Hurt : …now seeking to better evaluate equilibrium.Quote Summary - When analyst look back on these boom/bust price patterns, the supply and demand dat…

Argentina's Presidential Election Important for Soybean Market

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Argentina’s Presidential Election Important for Soybean Market
Michael Cordonnier, Soybean and Corn Advisor - Hinsdale, IllinoisThis Sunday’s presidential election in Argentina is important to soybean farmers in the United States. Todd Gleason has more. The vying candidates have differing views… 1:09 radio 1:13 radio self containedThe vying candidates have differing views on the commodity export tax. If it is removed, South American agricultural expert Michael Cordonnier of Soybean and Corn Advisor says farmers in Argentina will plant corn rather than beans. Cordonnier :28 …will go out there and plant some more corn. Quote Summary - That would be a game changer in Argentina. If they take off those export taxes, the farmers would like to plant more corn. Because right not there are six times more acres of soybeans than corn. They want to rotate more because the government is forcing them to have a mono crop of soybeans. So, if they take off the export tax. I think instantl…

2016 Farmland Price Outlook

2016 Farmland Price Outlook
Todd Kuethe, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

While farmland prices likely will continue to see downward pressure into 2016, the capitalized values do not suggest the price of farmland is too high or in a bubble. Todd Gleason has more from the agricultural economists at the University of Illinois.

Three agricultural economist at ILLINOIS have written…
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Three agricultural economist at ILLINOIS have written an article about the value of farmland for the Farm Doc Daily website. It, in simple terms, says two things. First, the price of farmland is not too high, or even in an economic bubble. Secondly, the downturn in commodity prices does not point to a situation like the farm crisis of the 1980s. Here’s one of the co-authors of the article, Todd Kuethe.
Kuethe :41 …those movements always getting pushed down the line.
Quote Summary - So the two parts to that are, first, obviously cash rents. Which we expect to…

The Regular Climate Pattern of Brazil

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The Regular Climate Pattern of Brazil
Mike Tannura, tStorm Weather - Chicago, IllinoisThey say it is best to keep your friends close and your …let’s go with competitors in the soybean market… even closer. Todd Gleason has this story on how weather patterns in Brazil generally unfold year in and year out. The Brazilian climate is unique…
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2:51 radio self contained The Brazilian climate is unique. It is unlike anything that occurs in the United States. However, this country is poised to become the world’s most productive source of soybeans. It is expected to unseat the U.S. in 2017, though that could happen as early as next year. Farmers in the state of Mato Grosso grow most of soybeans in Brazil. Their winter months, unlike what happens in the United States from New Orleans to Minneapolis and Columbus to Omaha, are bone dry says University of Illinois alum and agricultural meteorologist Mike Tannura. Tannura :20 ..somewhere around ten inches of rain per month. .Q…

Which Way for Soybean Prices

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Which Way for Soybean Prices
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisSoybean prices have been on a roller coaster over the past three months. Todd Gleason has more on which direction is most likely to maintain control.The price swings reflect changing expectations…
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4:00 radio self contained The price swings reflect changing expectations about the size of the U.S. soybean crop, uncertain U.S. export prospects, and the potential impact of the weather as it relates to El NiƱo. Depending on how those factors unfold, soybean prices could move substantially in either direction over the next six months. Here’s the case University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good says that can be built if one believes the price of soybeans will move lower.Good :40 …as was the case this year.Quote Summary - The case for lower soybean prices starts with the expectation that the U.S. average soybean yield for the crop currently being harvested will exceed…

Don't Bet the Cash Rented Farm on a Loss

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Don’t Bet the Cash Rented Farm on a Loss
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois

It is very difficult to give up a farm, even one that is losing money because the cash rent is too high. Todd Gleason has a few simple guidelines one might follow to help them make that decision.

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Those farmers thinking they can withstand a loss on a farm next year because the cash rent is too high should put things in a longterm perspective to see if it is viable strategy. First and foremost says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey realistic expectations of future returns should be used.

Schnitkey :28 …question if those rents are sustainable. If they are not, then lower those rents.
Quote Summary - It is about long run prices. It has been suggested $4.60 corn and $10.60 soybeans. Some years we will be above that and some year…

Africa and Soybean Trials

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Africa and Soybean Trials
Abush Tesfaye, Jimma Agricultural Research Institute - Ethiopia
Godfree Chigeza, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture - Zambia The nations of Africa have struggled to feed themselves for decades. There are some places, like South Africa, that have successfully adapted some of world’s primary crops. Corn is a good example. Soybeans are also grown in Africa, but they’re not particularly high yielding varieties. Todd Gleason reports soybean breeders from three African institutions have been visiting the United States in hopes of making some improvements. The Soybean Innovation Lab is on the third floor…
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2:57 radio self contained The Soybean Innovation Lab is on the third floor of Mumford Hall at the University of Illinois. It is just an office space in the agricultural college. Well, not really just an office space. The lab works to find better ways for Africa to feed itself and grow local economies. This is much easier said th…

The Corn Crop is Unlikely to be Overestimated

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The Corn Crop is Unlikely to be Overestimated
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisAfter the Crop Production report was released last week some of the trade began to discuss the possibility USDA had overestimated the size of the U.S. corn crop. Todd Gleason reports this is not very likely.The USDA’s October 9 Crop Production report forecast…
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3:46 radio self contained USDA’s October 9 Crop Production report forecast the 2015 corn crop at about 13.6 billion bushels. That was down 30 million bushels from September and 660 million bushels smaller than last year. Commentary following the release of the report suggests some believe the corn crop is even smaller. One of the factors cited as evidence the crop may be smaller than forecast is the strong basis levels in many markets. This seems the make some sense. The argument is that a crop as large as forecast, particularly in the face of a rapid pace of harvest and a large soybean crop, would no…

Working Capital on the Farm

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Working Capital on the Farm
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisLow commodity prices are quickly eating into the reserves farmers built up over the last several years. Todd Gleason has more on agriculture’s ‘working capital’. Farmers built up working capital reserves over…
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2:37 radio self containedFarmers built up working capital reserves over a six year period lasting from 2006 to 2012. Those reserves have been tapped each year since then in order to keep operations running smoothly says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey. However they’re still well above the average from little more than a decade ago.Schnitkey :25 …2004 when it was average close to $200. Quote Summary - The average grain farm enrolled in the Illinois FBFM record keeping service had $588 of working capital per acre at the end of 2014. Working capital is current assets minus current liabilities. This is up considerably from 2000 to …

TPP Will Create 76,000 Ag Related Jobs

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TPP Will Create 76,000 Ag Related Jobs
Tom Vilsack, U.S. Secretary of AgricultureThe Obama administration is working to inform the public about the benefits of the new trade deal called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. To that end the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture has been talking about job creation. In general the U.S. Trade Representative’s office reports every billion dollars of U.S. exports creates fifty-eight-hundred jobs. However, Tom Vilsack says every billion dollars worth of agricultural exports creates sixty-five-hundred jobs.Vilsack :33 …supporting thousands of good paying jobs. Quote - And those jobs are generally higher paying jobs. Anywhere from 13 to 18% higher in income. So, this is really about creating jobs and it is estimated, anticipated, there will be about 130 billion dollars in additional trade will take place in terms of our exports going to other countries. Nine-percent of that, on average, is usually agriculture, so you can do the math. You …

Sell on Short Term Rallies - Darrel Good Interview

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Sell on Short Term Rallies - Darrel Good Interview
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Wednesday, September 30th USDA tallied how much of last fall’s harvest was still left in the bin. Todd Gleason spoke with University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good about the figures. He started the conversation by asking which of the numbers were most important. There are three numbers I think everybody looks…
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Limited Pork Expansion

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Limited Pork Expansion
Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist The nation’s hog farmers have done a nice of job of not over reacting to last year’s record profits. Todd Gleason reports they’ve limited their expansion plans and consequently should see a good bottomline again for this year, and maybe next.For all of 2015, pork supplies are expected to be…
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3:14 radio self containedFor all of 2015, pork supplies are expected to be seven percent higher than in 2014. That year the price of pork averaged $76 mostly because the PED virus wreaked havoc on the industry. This years supplies have been farm more stable and supplies for 2016 should only be about one percent higher than in 2015. Hog prices are expected to average about $51 on a live weight basis for this year. Current projections for 2016 are for a similar average price and it means hog farmers will make money says Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. Hurt :29 …that further expansio…

Decreasing 2016 Cash Rents on Professionally Managed Farmland

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Decreasing 2016 Cash Rents on Professionally Managed Farmland
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisCash rents on professionally-managed farmland are set to decrease next year. That’s the conclusion of a survey in the state of Illinois. Todd Gleason has more…Each year, the Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers…
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2:17 tv cg Each year, the Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers asks its members how much, on average, they’re collecting for cash rent for the current year, and their expectations for next year. The survey provides a really good indicator of rents on professionally-managed farmland says Gary Schnitkey from the University of Illinois.Schnitkey :16 …down $32 from the 2015 rent.Quote Summary - We looked at that and for excellent quality farmland, 190 plus bushels per acre, the farm manages said rents in 2016 would be $318 per acre which is down $32…

How to Read the FSA Acreage Dump

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How to Read the FSA Acreage Dump
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisToday (Wednesday September 16, 2015) the Farm Service Agency released a new set of numbers. While these are preliminary figures of acreage and crops, Todd Gleason reports they do offer a hint of things to come in future official USDA estimates. First, it is really important to understand these numbers are raw…
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3:10 tv CG First, it is really important to understand these numbers are raw and come with no explanation. They are simply a monthly dump of the aggregated acreage figures reported to the FSA by those participating in federal farm programs. Participation requires them to report the number of planted, failed, and prevented plant acres of each program crop. These numbers are updated by FSA from August to January. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good explains how the raw numbers make their way into the official U…

$100,000,000 of Blender Pumps for 21 States

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$100,000,000 of Blender Pumps for 21 States
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack
Paul Jeschke, Farmer & Illinois Corn Marketing Board - Mazon, IllinoisThe U.S. Secretary of Agriculture held nothing back on the University of Illinois campus yesterday (Thursday Sept 10) when he talked about bio fuels and blender pumps for 21 states. Todd Gleason has more from the U of I’s Energy Farm just south of the Urbana-Champaign campus.The Secretary of Ag came to the U of I campus…
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2:13 radio self containedThe Secretary of Ag came to the U of I campus to talk about two things. The importance or agricultural research and blender pumps. However, he started his press conference with a shot over the bow of the oil industry. He thinks it is fearful of competition from farmers. Competition that Tom Vilsack says is making gasoline more affordable. Vilsack :22 …to create job opportunities in rural places. Quote Summary - They know it is reducing the cost of gasoline to con…

2016 Cash Rents May Need to Drop $100

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2016 Cash Rents May Need to Drop $100
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisFarm income this year is going to be dramatically lower than in the past. Next year doesn’t look any better even on highly productive central Illinois soils. Todd Gleason reports farmers must cut costs to survive, and that cash rents may need to come down by as much as one-hundred-dollars per acre. Let’s start with this year’s income from an…
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2:34 tv CGLet’s start with this year’s income from an acre of corn. Today a central Illinois farmer that raises 200 bushel corn can expect, on average, to be paid $3.65 for each bushel. That’s an income of $730 per acre, plus any government payments - let’s make it $800 even. These are the numbers being used by Gary Schnitkey at the University of Illinois.Schnitkey :41 …just be in the same ballpark of breaking even.Quote Summary - We have $800 of revenue, and we have been running …

Labor Day (First Monday in September)

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Labor Day (First Monday in September)
Source: US Embassy Stockholm Sweden
This piece is self contained. It needs no anchor introI’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois…
3:19I’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois Extension with a history of Labor Day in the United States. It’s adapted from a story found on the United States Embassy to Sweden’s website.Eleven-year-old Peter McGuire sold papers on the street in New York City. He shined shoes and cleaned stores and later ran errands. It was 1863 and his father, a poor Irish immigrant, had just enlisted to fight in the Civil War. Peter had to help support his mother and six brothers and sisters.Many immigrants settled in New York City in the nineteenth century. They found that living conditions were not as wonderful as they had dreamed. Often there were six families crowded into a house made for one family. Thousands of children had to go to work. Working conditions were even worse. Immigrant men, women and children w…

Lower Pork Costs Driven by Lower Meal Costs

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Lower Pork Costs Driven by Lower Meal Costs
Chris Hurt, Agricultural Economist - Purdue University ExtensionThe retail price of a pork chop is getting cheaper. Todd Gleason reports the price of soybean meal is one of the reasons for the decline. Soybean meal is an important but an “economically” secondary feed… 3:47 radio 4:06 radio self containedSoybean meal is an important but an “economically” secondary feed ingredient in hog diets compared to corn. Purdue University Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt thinks soybean meal costs, as a feed ingredient, have been about 22 percent of the total costs of raising hogs over the past decade. This compares to 32 percent for corn. In recent years soybean meal has been high priced. For the calendar years of 2012, 2013 and 2014 USDA reports that Decatur, Illinois high-protein meal has had annual averages between $440 and $480 per ton. But with a record U.S. soybean crop in the fall of 2014 and with the second largest crop likely comi…