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Showing posts from 2015

4 Step Weed Control Plan for Corn or Soybeans

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4 Step Weed Control Plan for Corn or Soybeans
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - Univeristy of Illinois

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Since the 1960’s farmers have been using herbicides to control weeds. Frankly, herbicide formulations haven’t changed that much and the weeds have managed to find ways to adapt. Todd Gleason has this four step plan from the Univesity of Illinois to control them in corn or soybeans.

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Some weeds have become resistant to the herbicides farmers use to control them. Others have lengthened their germination period, emerging later in the season, avoiding early spring control methods. University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has a four step plan farmers can use to maintain a competitive edge in corn or soybeans. It starts by planting into a weed free seedbed.

Hager :22 …vegetation without adequate control ahead of time.
Quote Summary - It is easy to achieve a weed free seedbed by either re…

EPA's RFS Decision will push Biodiesel Usage

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EPA’s RFS Decision will push Biodiesel Usage
Scott Irwin, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisDownloadsThe United States Environmental Protection Agency is beginning to comply with the letter of the law as it pertains to biofuels. Todd Gleason reports this could be a boon for biodiesel made from soybeans.2:14 radio
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EPA this week announced it would force oil companies to find more ways to use renewable fuels. This is something the oil industry has resisted saying it was too difficult to use much more than the ten percent ethanol blend already found in gasoline. This is called the blend wall and is actually less than the total number of gallons of renewable fuels congress mandated be used in 2016 when it originally wrote the law. Since not all cars can burn greater than 10 percent ethanol in gasoline, and the amount of gasoline used in the United States is less than the renewable f…

An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments

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An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
FarmDocDaily Source ArticleDownloadsFarmers and their bankers can get a jump on just how much income to expect from the ARC County program next fall. Todd Gleason has more on how NASS county yields can be used to anticipate the payments.Farm income is down dramatically…
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2:43 radio self contained Farm income is down dramatically. It means farmers will be going to bankers for production loans this winter. Those loans will be used to plant next season’s crops. The bankers will be looking for every clue they can to help them make solid lending decisions. One source of income they’ll want to calculate comes from the farm programs. However, the ARC County payments won’t be figured until the fall. It is possible to estimate these payments by substituting NASS county yields for the FSA computed yields says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitke…

FEFO - An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments

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FEFO - An Early Jump on Computing ARC-CO Payments
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe Farm Service Agency (FSA) computes county yields used in calculating Agricultural Risk Coverage—County Option (ARC-CO) payments. FSA yields differ from county yields released by the National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS). While different, NASS yields will be useful in estimating 2015 ARC-CO payments when they are released in late February 2016. FSA likely will not release FSA yields until autumn of 2016. Many farmers, lenders, and landowners will desire payment estimates before the autumn. In many cases, NASS yields can be used to arrive at realistic estimates of ARC-CO payments. To aid in ARC-CO payment estimation, the average differences between FSA and NASS yields are reported in this article for corn in Illinois counties.

Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014

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Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisDownloadsThe price of seed corn has gone up a lot over the years. Not as much as the price of farmland, but as Todd Gleason reports, it is no distant second. 2:53 radio
3:03 radio self contained Over the eight years from 2006 to 2014 the per acre cost of seed corn increased 164 percent. The really big increases came in the first four years, ’06, ’07, ’08, and ’09…which happens to correspond with the primary the build out of the ethanol industry in the United States. Gary Schnitkey thought these numbers, pulled from the state’s aggregated FBFM - that stands for Farm Business Farm Management - record keeping service were pretty interesting. So, he decided to look at the increase and think about the seed corn industry. Schnitkey :40 …we’ve had some pretty large increase since then. Quote Summary - It’s interesting. Between 1995 and 2006 seed cost increased at an average annual ra…

Four Step Weed Control Plan for 2016

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Four Step Weed Control Plan for 2016
Aaron Hager, Weed Scientist - University of Illinois
VOICER Farmers battling herbicide resistant weeds are running out of control options. University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has this four step recommendation.Really a good four step plan for weed control… 2:00 radio & tv
…very significant challenges later in the growing season.Aaron Hager is an Extension Weed Scientist at the University of Illinois. You may read detailed information of his four step weed control plan online. Search for “bulletin” and “University of Illinois”.SoundCloud Embed
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Sideways Price Pattern to Continue for Corn

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Sideways Price Pattern to Continue for Corn
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe price of corn has been choppy, but trading sideways. Todd Gleason reports it is a trend likely to continue for sometime. USDA’s forecast of this year’s corn crop has…
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1:59 radio self contained USDA’s forecast of this year’s corn crop has been very stable since it was first made. It started at 168.8 bushels to the acre in August, dropped to 167 and half in September, and then rebounded to 168 last month. The total production forecast declined by only 131 million bushels, slightly less than one percent, from August to October. In addition, the USDA estimate of September 1 stocks of old crop corn came in almost exactly as expected. New yield and production forecasts will be released on November 10. Changes from the October forecasts are expected to be modest says Darrel Good. So, there’s not been much happening on the supply front to move the price of corn a…

Farmland Prices and Farm Solvency Then & Now

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Farmland Prices and Farm Solvency Then & Now
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Years of low commodity prices, and losses on the farm, have some wondering whether the agricultural boom-bust cycle of the 1970’s and 80’s is repeating itself. The balance sheets, as Todd Gleason reports, say probably not. There are some big differences between the farm crisis…
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There are some big differences between the farm crisis of the 1980’s and the current situation in middle America. Then, as now, commodity price had slumped after soaring for a few years. The price of farmland had skyrocketed, too, just like now. However, unlike today interest rates were high and farmers were deep in debt when the price of farmland finally bottomed 42 percent below its high. Gary Schnitkey wanted to know what would happen today in that kind of worst case scenario. So he ran the numbers. S…

World Health Organization Oversteps with Red Meat Assertion

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World Health Organization Oversteps with Red Meat Assertion
John Erdman, Food Scientist & Professor Emeritus - University of IllinoisWhile it has been known for quite sometime that processed meats… things like bacon and sausage and jerky… might slightly increase your risk of colorectal cancer. A professor emeritus of food science at the University of Illinois says the World Health Organization may have thrown up too much of a red flag on them, and certainly did so on red meat.Erdman :19 …overstep their bounds a little bit on that. Quote Summary - The W-H-O report then went into the red meats, the unprocessed meats, and suggested there is an increased risk of certain cancers. I think they did overstep their bounds a little bit on that. The W-H-O report admits it was unable to say the 800 studies they looked at correlated eating red meat with the development of cancer. The increased risk of contracting colorectal cancer from eating processed meat every day, puts …

Interview with Illinois Professor Emeritus on W-H-O Red Meat Release

Interview with Illinois Professor Emeritus on W-H-O Red Meat Release
John Erdman, Food Scientist & Professor Emeritus - University of IllinoisDiscussion with Food Science Professor Emeritus John Erdman about the World Health Organization’s red meat, processed meat as carcinogens 2015 release.

Crop Insurance Undercut by Budget Deal

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SPOT NEWS VOICER
Crop Insurance Undercut by Budget Deal Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois The federal government is expected to vote on the budget deal, maybe as soon as today. If it goes through unchanged one of the safety net programs for agriculture, crop insurance, will most definitely fall to the axe says University of Illinois Ag Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess. Coppess :11 …getting changes at this hour is an uphill climb.Quote Summary - I’ve heard that this saves about three billion dollars and that it is part of a big budget package. Getting changes at this hour is an uphill climb.Coppess is in Washington, D.C. today. He says the deal would not eliminate crop insurance, but might force premiums higher, and shrink the number of places capable of providing it.

Crop Insurance S.R.A. Capped at 8.9% Under Budget Deal

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Crop Insurance S.R.A. Capped at 8.9% Under Budget Deal
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois

The federal government is expected to vote on the budget deal, maybe as soon as today. If it goes through unchanged one of the safety net programs from agriculture will most definitely fall to the axe. Todd Gleason has more on what will happen to crop insurance.

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University of Illinois Ag Policy Specialist Jonathan Coppess is in Washington, D.C. He says the deal would require the Obama Administration to renegotiate the Standard Reinsurance Agreement or S.R.A. and take 3 billion dollars out of the crop insurance program over a ten year period.

Coppess :44 …getting changes at this hour is an uphill climb.
Quote Summary - And within that renegotiation put a cap if you will, or a limit on the rate of return for crop insurance companies at a very low ra…

SPOT NEWS: World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat "Probably" Carcinogenic

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SPOT NEWS
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World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat “Probably” Carcinogenic

Red meat causes cancer. That’s what the headlines are saying, but as you’ll hear from Todd Gleason the W-H-O study doesn’t quite come to that conclusion.

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Monday (October 26, 2015) the World Health Organization suggested it would be good to limit the amount of red and processed meat we consume. There has been quite a firestorm in the media declaring “red meat causes cancer”.

That’s not actually what the W-H-O said in its press release. It actually classified the consumption of red meat as “probably” carcinogenic to humans. Going on to point out that processed meats, things like ham & sausage or hotdogs & corned beef, if eaten every day does increase the chance of getting colorectal cancer by 18%.

Again - red meat, steaks, pork chops and the like, “probably carcinogenic” but …

FEATURE - World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat "Probably" Carcinogenic

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FEATURE
World Health Organization Classifies Red Meat “Probably” CarcinogenicRed meat causes cancer. That’s what the headlines are saying, but as you’ll hear from Todd Gleason the W-H-O study doesn’t quite come to that conclusion.Monday (October 26, 2015) the World Health Organization suggested…
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3:09 radio self contained Monday (October 26, 2015) the World Health Organization suggested it would be good to limit the amount of red and processed meat we consume. There has been quite a firestorm in the media declaring “red meat causes cancer”. That’s not actually what the W-H-O said in its press release. It actually classified the consumption of red meat as “probably” carcinogenic to humans. Going on to point out that processed meats, things like ham & sausage or hotdogs & corned beef, if eaten every day does increase the chance of getting colorectal cancer by 18%. Again - red meat, steaks, pork chops and the like, “probably carcinogenic” but the 800 studie…

Beef: High Prices Cure High Prices

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Beef: High Prices Cure High Prices
Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist The adage that the cure for high prices is “High Prices” sure looks right for the beef market this year. Todd Gleason has more with Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. The price of beef cattle reached a record high…
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4:05 radio self contained The price of beef cattle reached a record high of about $170 for a hundred pounds in late 2014 and early 2015. It has plummeted since, dropping 50 bucks. Interestingly, hogs took a similar nose dive from mid-last year to this year and it seems likely the price of eggs, which skyrocketed last spring because of Avian Influenza, is destined for the same fate. Or so thinks Purdue Extension Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt. He says it is all part of agriculture’s boom/bust cycle.Hurt : …now seeking to better evaluate equilibrium.Quote Summary - When analyst look back on these boom/bust price patterns, the supply and demand dat…

Argentina's Presidential Election Important for Soybean Market

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Argentina’s Presidential Election Important for Soybean Market
Michael Cordonnier, Soybean and Corn Advisor - Hinsdale, IllinoisThis Sunday’s presidential election in Argentina is important to soybean farmers in the United States. Todd Gleason has more. The vying candidates have differing views… 1:09 radio 1:13 radio self containedThe vying candidates have differing views on the commodity export tax. If it is removed, South American agricultural expert Michael Cordonnier of Soybean and Corn Advisor says farmers in Argentina will plant corn rather than beans. Cordonnier :28 …will go out there and plant some more corn. Quote Summary - That would be a game changer in Argentina. If they take off those export taxes, the farmers would like to plant more corn. Because right not there are six times more acres of soybeans than corn. They want to rotate more because the government is forcing them to have a mono crop of soybeans. So, if they take off the export tax. I think instantl…

The Regular Climate Pattern of Brazil

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The Regular Climate Pattern of Brazil
Mike Tannura, tStorm Weather - Chicago, IllinoisThey say it is best to keep your friends close and your …let’s go with competitors in the soybean market… even closer. Todd Gleason has this story on how weather patterns in Brazil generally unfold year in and year out. The Brazilian climate is unique…
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2:51 radio self contained The Brazilian climate is unique. It is unlike anything that occurs in the United States. However, this country is poised to become the world’s most productive source of soybeans. It is expected to unseat the U.S. in 2017, though that could happen as early as next year. Farmers in the state of Mato Grosso grow most of soybeans in Brazil. Their winter months, unlike what happens in the United States from New Orleans to Minneapolis and Columbus to Omaha, are bone dry says University of Illinois alum and agricultural meteorologist Mike Tannura. Tannura :20 ..somewhere around ten inches of rain per month. .Q…

Africa and Soybean Trials

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Africa and Soybean Trials
Abush Tesfaye, Jimma Agricultural Research Institute - Ethiopia
Godfree Chigeza, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture - Zambia The nations of Africa have struggled to feed themselves for decades. There are some places, like South Africa, that have successfully adapted some of world’s primary crops. Corn is a good example. Soybeans are also grown in Africa, but they’re not particularly high yielding varieties. Todd Gleason reports soybean breeders from three African institutions have been visiting the United States in hopes of making some improvements. The Soybean Innovation Lab is on the third floor…
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2:57 radio self contained The Soybean Innovation Lab is on the third floor of Mumford Hall at the University of Illinois. It is just an office space in the agricultural college. Well, not really just an office space. The lab works to find better ways for Africa to feed itself and grow local economies. This is much easier said th…

Working Capital on the Farm

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Working Capital on the Farm
Gary Schnitkey, Extension Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisLow commodity prices are quickly eating into the reserves farmers built up over the last several years. Todd Gleason has more on agriculture’s ‘working capital’. Farmers built up working capital reserves over…
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2:37 radio self containedFarmers built up working capital reserves over a six year period lasting from 2006 to 2012. Those reserves have been tapped each year since then in order to keep operations running smoothly says University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Gary Schnitkey. However they’re still well above the average from little more than a decade ago.Schnitkey :25 …2004 when it was average close to $200. Quote Summary - The average grain farm enrolled in the Illinois FBFM record keeping service had $588 of working capital per acre at the end of 2014. Working capital is current assets minus current liabilities. This is up considerably from 2000 to …

How to Read the FSA Acreage Dump

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How to Read the FSA Acreage Dump
Darrel Good, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisToday (Wednesday September 16, 2015) the Farm Service Agency released a new set of numbers. While these are preliminary figures of acreage and crops, Todd Gleason reports they do offer a hint of things to come in future official USDA estimates. First, it is really important to understand these numbers are raw…
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3:10 tv CG First, it is really important to understand these numbers are raw and come with no explanation. They are simply a monthly dump of the aggregated acreage figures reported to the FSA by those participating in federal farm programs. Participation requires them to report the number of planted, failed, and prevented plant acres of each program crop. These numbers are updated by FSA from August to January. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Darrel Good explains how the raw numbers make their way into the official U…

Labor Day (First Monday in September)

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Labor Day (First Monday in September)
Source: US Embassy Stockholm Sweden
This piece is self contained. It needs no anchor introI’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois…
3:19I’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois Extension with a history of Labor Day in the United States. It’s adapted from a story found on the United States Embassy to Sweden’s website.Eleven-year-old Peter McGuire sold papers on the street in New York City. He shined shoes and cleaned stores and later ran errands. It was 1863 and his father, a poor Irish immigrant, had just enlisted to fight in the Civil War. Peter had to help support his mother and six brothers and sisters.Many immigrants settled in New York City in the nineteenth century. They found that living conditions were not as wonderful as they had dreamed. Often there were six families crowded into a house made for one family. Thousands of children had to go to work. Working conditions were even worse. Immigrant men, women and children w…

USDA's Crop Yield Forecasting Method

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USDA’s Crop Yield Forecasting MethodUSDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will release the first survey-based yield and production forecasts for the 2015 corn and soybean crops this Wednesday (tomorrow/today). Even though a description of the NASS crop production forecast methodology is widely available, there always seems to be some misconceptions about how NASS makes corn and soybean yield forecasts. University of Illinois agricultural economists Darrel Good and Scott Irwin put together a brief overview of that methodology and posted to the FarmDocDaily website. While they say their summary does not do full justice to the very comprehensive forecasting methodology, it is useful to place the upcoming yield forecasts in the proper perspective. Todd Gleason has more on the how the report is calculated.NASS corn and soybean yield forecasts are made in August…
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The Economic Impact of a County Fair

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The Economic Impact of a County Fair
Zach Kennedy, Community & Economic Development - University of IllinoisHave you been to your local county fair this year. There is a pretty good chance that’s the case. Did you know in Illinois the county fairs create about 170 million dollars worth of economic activity. Todd Gleason does, and he files this report. These agricultural celebrations are money makers…
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1:39 tv cg These agricultural celebrations are money makers knitted tightly into the fabric of rural America and its economy.nat sound sheepThe Community and Economic Development crew at the University of Illinois surveyed fair goers last summer to get an idea just how much they spend and why they go. nat sound ticket boothEntertainment, of course is high on the list says Zach Kennedey. Kennedy :08 …were there just for the food. Quote Summary - We also found that they were there for anything ranging from doing activities to seei…

Feeding Poor Quality Wheat & Straw to Cattle

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Feeding Poor Quality Wheat & Straw to Cattle
Travis Meteer, Extension Beef Cattle Specialist - University of IllinoisThe soft red winter wheat crop in the United States is in pretty bad condition. Some of it will most certainly be fed to livestock. Todd Gleason has more on how beef producers should use wheat and wheat straw. The soft red winter wheat crop is in poor condition and some…
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2:31 radio self containedThe soft red winter wheat crop is in poor condition and some of it will not be used to make cookies and crackers and pastries. Instead it will be fed to livestock, most likely beef cattle. If this is the case the first thing to do with the wheat says University of Illinois Beef Cattle Specialist Travis Meteer (meh-tir) is to store it properly.Meteer :25 …and stop any future problems in storage. Quote Summary - What I mean by that is to quickly get the grain dried down and stop the growth of that mycotoxin. At higher moisture levels, over eighteen perce…

Wheat Consumption Tracks Our Eating Habits

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Wheat Consumption Tracks Our Eating Habits
USDA ERS

The following chart and commentary are posted to a USDA ERS website. Essentially it tracks how many pounds of wheat flour the average U.S. citizen has consumed per year since 1964. The ERS commentary on the reasons for the increase in consumption through the mid–1990’s and sudden drop near the turn of the century reflect the eating habits of a couple generations of Americans.

Wheat consumption stable among U.S. consumers in recent years


Per capita wheat flour consumption has been relatively stable in recent years, and is estimated in 2014 at 135 pounds per person, unchanged from 2013 but down 3 pounds from the recent peak in 2007. The 2014 estimate is down 11 pounds from the 2000 level when flour use started dropping sharply, partially due to increased consumer interest in low-carbohydrate diets. From the turn of the 20th century until about 1970, U.S. per capita wheat use generally declined, as strenuous physical labor bec…

The Declaration of Independence

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The Declaration of Independence
I’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois Extension…
3:16I’m Todd Gleason for University of Illinois Extension. Two-hundred-twenty-five years ago our fore-fathers declared sovereignty when 56 men of the American Colonies signed the Declaration of Independence. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson between June 11 and June 28, 1776. What Jefferson did was to summarize “self-evident truths” and set forth a list of grievances against the King in order to justify before the world the breaking of ties between the colonies and the Great Britain. What follows is an excerpt of the beginning and ending of the Unite States Declaration of Independence. Jefferson wrote:IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776…The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the sep…

Historical Accounts of the Weather’s Impact

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Historical Accounts of the Weather’s Impact
Mike Tannura, tStorm Weather - Chicago, IllinoisSelf Contained 3:57

Lawn & Garden Care | Bag Worms

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Lawn & Garden Care | Bag Worms
Phil Nixon, Extension Entomologist - University of IllinoisDepending on exactly where you live in Illinois it may be time to treat for bag worms on your trees and shrubs. Todd Gleason has more from University of Illinois Extension. Bag worms are caterpillars that commonly live in groups…
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2:29 radio self contained Bag worms are caterpillars that commonly live in groups. These groups are not colonies, the worms just live near each other. Honestly, bag worms live in little silk tents. They haul these tents, bags, around with them. The tents are camouflaged with pieces of leaves says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Phil Nixon.Nixon :31 …but also will get on deciduous trees.Quote Summary - Being detached pieces of foliage these will dry up and turn brown. Bag worms are problem primarily on needled evergreen trees; junipers including eastern red cedar, arborvitae, and eastern white pine. Bag worms are found almost exclu…

EPA's RFS Puts Biodiesel in the Drivers Seat

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EPA’s RFS Puts Biodiesel in the Drivers Seat
Scott Irwin, Ag Economist - University of IllinoisThe nation could be running on a lot more biodiesel in future. Todd Gleason reports the latest U.S. EPA proposal would firmly set a path to create a second biofuels industry in the United States. The United States Environmental Protection Agency…
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2:15 tv cgThe United States Environmental Protection Agency, by the authority of congress, sets mandates - within some congressional parameters - for the amount of renewable energy the nation should consume. Part of this energy plan has allowed U.S. farmers to build and deploy corn based ethanol as a gasoline additive. Phase two, as set out by congress and proposed by EPA in May, may do the same thing for biodiesel made from oilseeds says University of Illinois ag economist Scott Irwin.Irwin :18 …driver’s seat rather than corn based ethanol.Quote Summary - If one takes the EPA policy as given …

Use Multiple Effective Herbicides to Control Weeds

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Use Multiple Effective Herbicides to Control Weeds
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of IllinoisGoing forward farmers should think more about using multiple herbicides that will control resistant weeds than simply using a single control method. Todd Gleason has the terms of this statement.University of Illinois researchers pulled more that 500 site…
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2:00 radio self contained University of Illinois researchers pulled more that 500 site years worth of data from a retail applicator to see how resistant weeds developed in farmers’ fields. What they found is this says U of I Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager… slowing the development and spread of resistant weeds happened best when a farmer used several different effective herbicides to control the weed every time an application was made. Here’s Hager.Hager :20 …in tank mixtures when we make post emergence applications.Quote Summary - What the results are suggesting is that using a residual herbici…

Slowing Herbicide Resistance Evolution

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Slowing Herbicide Resistance Evolution
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of IllinoisWeed scientists from the Univesity of Illinois have been trying help farmers manage the inevitable development of herbicide resistance for more than two decades. Todd Gleason reports there is now proof which advice actually works. Plants are quite capable of evolving…
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2:54 radio self contained Plants are quite capable of evolving. Weeds like waterhemp have evolved. These weeds are resistant to some of the herbicides used to control them. It was thought, by many weed scientists, this evolution would take place much more quickly with the overuse of any particular active ingredient. So, extension specialists like Aaron Hager from the University of Illinois promoted the rotation of herbicides and modes of action. They didn’t have proof this would work, but now they do with qualifications.Hager :47 …tank mixed herbicides every time an application is made. Quote Summar…

RFS Matters for Biodiesel

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RFS Matters for Biodiesel
Scott Irwin, Ag Economist - University of Illinois

The United States Environmental Protection Agency now says it will not update the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates until November. Todd Gleason reports this year’s RFS, no matter when it is released, is really important to the biodiesel industry.

More often than not when the federal government’s…
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More often than not when the federal government’s Renewable Fuel Standard is discussed people are thinking about corn based ethanol or other feedstocks that can produce ethanol. However, when U.S. EPA finally releases the RFS mandates it may be the biodiesel industry that pays the most attention says University of Illinois Ag Economist Scott Irwin.
Irwin :36 …to find out what happens.
Quote Summary - The industry for which the RFS is really a life or death matter is biodiesel. Because if the EPA would choose to go back to the RFS statutory level ma…

Poultry Research & the University of Illinois Campus

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Poultry Research & the University of Illinois Campus
Ken Koelkebeck, Extension Poultry Specialist - University of Illinois Illinois is NOT known as a key chicken production state. Regardless of this fact, the state’s Land Grant university is a primary player in the poultry industry. Todd Gleason has this review of ILLINOIS’ applied research prowess and its relationship to the state’s agricultural feed production history. Farmers in the Prairie State raise corn and soybeans…
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2:33 tv CG Farmers in the Prairie State raise corn and soybeans and they do it really well. These crops are used to feed animals and birds; chickens. Lots of chickens, but most of them are reared in other states. Much of the feed comes from Illinois and so does the research that supports the nation’s poultry industry says Ken Koelkebeck (coal-keg-beck) from the University of Illinois.Koelkebeck :33 …that came out color sexed males or females. Quote Summar…

Protect Backyard Chickens from Avian Flu

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Protect Backyard Chickens from Avian Flu
Chet Utterback, Poultry Research Farm Manager - University of Illinois

More people than you might think are keeping chickens in their backyards. These birds, just as those grown commercially, are at risk to the H5N2 Avian Influenza virus. Todd Gleason has more on why and what keepers of backyard flocks can do to protect their birds.

Turkeys and chickens along the Mississippi River flyway…

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Turkeys and chickens along the Mississippi River flyway in the Midwest are at risk to catching the flu every year. This year a new highly contagious version of the virus called H5N2 has developed. It’s nasty and a bird killer. This is why the U.S. government is taking so much care to control its spread. The farm manager of the University of Illinois’ poultry research facilities, Chet Utterback, says commercial flocks aren’t the only birds at risk.

U…

Winter Feeding & the Cow Calf Operation

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Winter Feeding & the Cow Calf Operation
Dan Shike, Beef Specialist - University of Illinois Winter nutrition for the cow calf operation is key. Todd Gleason reports from Urbana, Illinois it may be the best opportunity to positively affect real income. This was the message heard during the annual…
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2:16 tv short-cg This was the message heard during the annual Beef & Beyond conference. It was clear and concise. The winter feeding program at a cow calf operation separates profitable farms from less profitable operations. It depends a lot on stored feed says University of Illinois Beef Cattle Specialist Dan Shike.Shike :12 …what’s the least cost approach.Quote Summary - How much stored feed are they having to purchase and what is their winter feeding program. We would like to graze as many days as we can, but if we can’t graze we have to feed them something. What’s the least cost approach.Least cost o…