Posts

WEDNESDAY WEBINAR

Image
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Tomorrow (Wednesday from noon to 1pm central) former University of Illinois President Bob Easter will make a presentation on feeding the world in the 21st Century. 
Bob is an animal scientist specializing in pork production. He has made annual trips to China to teach pork production for more than three decades. I can only speculate that he will take up AFS in some detail and incorporate that into his 21st Century presentation. 
It is free. You or someone in your shop should register. The information should be very, very good. 
Todd Gleason
----

Farmdoc Webinar: & in the 21st Century * Presented by Robert A. Easter, President Emeritus * Wed, Apr 17 - noon to 1 p.m. CDT * Will there be enough food by 2050? Protein demand, animal/crop production Registration: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1659489999268641293

Good Yields! Yes but a Warning | an interview with Gary Schnitkey

ifr190412–084
Good Yields! Yes but a Warning | an interview with Gary Schnitkey
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinoisby Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily articleOn a national basis, corn and soybean yields were near record-breaking levels in 2018, with exceptional yields in central Illinois and the eastern United States contributing heavily to those near-record U.S. yields. Other areas had below-trend yields. The county yields for corn and soybeans presented in this article illustrate these facts. Much higher U.S. yields are possible if all areas have exceptional yields. However, all areas including Illinois should not expect above-trend yields in every year.Corn YieldsThe 2018 corn yield for the United States was 176.4 bushels per acre, just .2 bushels below the record yield of 176.6 bushels per acre set in 2017 (all yields in this article are from QuickStats, a website maintained by the National Agricultural Statistical Service). From a…

USDA Reports Provide Surprises for Corn

ifr190405–072
USDA Reports Provide Surprises for Corn
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois


Friday’s USDA reports surprised the corn market. Todd Gleason has more on how more corn acreage than expected this year coupled with more corn leftover from last year than expected will influence prices.

by Todd Hubbs, University of Illinois
read farmdocdaily article
watch post USDA report webinar with Todd Hubbs and Scott Irwin

The USDA’s quarterly Grain Stocks report and annual Prospective Planting report delivered surprises to the corn market. A greater than expected corn stocks number combined with higher than expected planted acreage of corn gave very bearish news to corn prices. Soybean stocks and acreage came in neutral to slightly positive for soybean prices.

March 1 corn stocks came in at 8.605 billion bushels compared to an average trade guess of 8.335 billion bushels. The stocks estimate suggested feed and residual use of corn during the first half of the 2018–19 mar…

Pre-Season Tar Spot Checklist for Corn

ifr190329–069
Pre-Season Tar Spot Checklist for Corn
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of Illinois

Tar spot is a relatively new disease of corn in the Midwest. Todd Gleason has this pre-season checklist for farmers, roughly speaking, north of Interstate 80.

Tar spot has been showing up on field corn…
1:22 radio
1:28 radio self-contained



Tar spot has been showing up on field corn in Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, and Florida says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski (kleh-CHEH-ski).

Kleczewski :20 …where we’ve had the most pressure.
  Quote Summary - That’s where it is found right now. But in terms of severity, where we have seen it the most and the pressure is the highest, if you would take the lower portion of Lake Michigan and draw a section around there, that is where we’ve had the greatest severity right now. That is where we’ve had the most pressure.

Kleczewski (kleh-CHEH-ski) says this is because tar spot…

The Economic Advisability of Lowering 2019 N Rates on Corn

Image
ifr190322–061
The Economic Advisability of Lowering 2019 N Rates on Corn
Gary Schnitkey - Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois



by Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois
read farmdocDaily article

Spring field operations will soon begin, and nitrogen applications on corn will commence. More nitrogen will be applied this spring than is typical because wet weather limited fall applications. University-recommended nitrogen application rates in Illinois are between 140 and 180 pounds of actual nitrogen per acre for corn-following-soybeans. For farmers applying above those rates, application reductions seem prudent this year. If a farmer is uncomfortable lowering to the University-recommended rates, experimenting by leaving strips in fields seems prudent.

Why Consider Lowering Nitrogen Application Rates in 2019?

Two economic factors suggest urgency in lowering nitrogen rates this year. First, net incomes on Illinois farms could be extremely low in 2019. Proje…

Farmers Unlikely to Make Big Acreage Switch to Corn

ifr190301–040
Farmers Unlikely to Make Big Acreage Switch to Corn
Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe scuttlebutt in the trade, even in the numbers released by USDA at its February Agricultural Outlook Forum, is that the economics will push farmers to plant a lot more corn acres this year. Todd Gleason reports University of Illinois crop budgets don’t bear that out.Ag Economist Gary Schnitkey has updated budgets…
1:35 radio
1:53 radio self-contained Ag Economist Gary Schnitkey has updated budgets for corn and soybeans across the state. He knows USDA increased its expectation for corn acres around the nation by about 3 million acres but says he does not expect a big shift to corn in Illinois.Schnitkey :25 …more profitable for 2019 Quote Summary - What we find is that corn is projected to be more profitable than soybeans. This is the first year in a while that has happened. However, our budgets do not suggest shifting to more corn production. Particularly c…

Corn Acreage in 2019

ifr190222–033
Corn Acreage in 2019
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois read farmdocDaily articleThe number of acres of corn planted this spring will be a key factor in determining where the price of corn goes. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs took up the issue in this week’s farmdocDaily article. Todd Gleason has more on the prospects. He starts with a historical graph…
2:13 radio
2:29 radio self-contained He starts with a historical graph. It shows the principal crop acres in the United States and how those have changed since 1997. Both corn and soybean acreage have increased. Combined they’re up about 10 percent over the past two decades.INSERT fdd190218–01.pngIllinois’ Todd Hubbs uses that history to help put the number or corn and soybeans acres into perspective.Hubbs :43 …corn acreage we think we are going to see.Quote Summary - When we look at the harvest month corn to soybean futures price ratio this year it has been about 2.37. Th…