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KILL 9am Jun 22 | Farm Bill Vote Friday

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KILL 9am Jun 22 | Farm Bill Vote Friday
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois The House of Representatives is set to vote Friday (today) on a version of the farm bill that failed earlier in the year. Todd Gleason has more from the Univeristy of Illinois on how the vote may go, what the bill contains, and how it compares to the Senate’s version of the legislation.

Nothing to do about Seedling Diseases in Soybean

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Nothing to do about Seedling Diseases in Soybean
Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Plant Pathologist - University of IllinoisSoybean seed treatments aren’t working at the moment and there’s nothing a farmer can do. Todd Gleason has more from east central Illinois.1:47 radio
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2:01 tv cgIf you drive around much you’ll have noted some drown out areas in soybean fields, probably across the whole of the corn belt. Those are pretty easy to spot, but there are some areas that look like they’ve not been underwater - at least not for very long, if at all. They’re wilted back and showing signs of seedling diseases says University of Illinois Extension Plant Pathologist Nathan Kleczewski. Kleczewski :20 …are well past that point now. Quote Summary - Why am I seeing these diseases now? You must remember these soybeans have been in the ground for 30 or 40 days and seed treatments are going to only give us two to three weeks of protection. Under perfect cond…

Replacing Petrochemicals with Biochemicals made from Corn

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Replacing Petrochemicals with Biochemicals made from Corn
Vijah Singh, Agricultural Engineer - University of IllinoisFarmers gathered in St. Louis this week (June 4, 5, 6) to learn about future uses for the nation’s number one commodity crop. Todd Gleason has more from the Corn Utilization Technology Conference. CUTC happens every two years…
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2:02 tv cg CUTC happens every two years. It is a conference dedicated to future uses of corn. Vijay Singh is a regular. He works for the agricultural college at the University of Illinois and specializes in engineering ethanol processing plants. He sees them expanding to include biochemical production in the near future. Singh :23 …comes from the corn processing industry.Quote Summary - You know chemicals have been around, but they come from petroleum sources. Now what we are doing is rather than using petroleum sources is using renewable sources. That’s the big thing right now and for that we ne…

Corn Growth Stage and Post-Emergence Herbicides

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Corn Growth Stage and Post-Emergence Herbicides
Aaron Hager, Extension Weed Scientist - University of Illinois The month of May was one of the warmest on record across the Midwest. That heat has the corn crop growing really fast. As Todd Gleason reports, this means farmers will be short on time to get post-emergence herbicide applications done. The labels of most post-emergence corn…
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1:38 tv cg The labels of most post-emergence corn herbicides allow applications at various crop growth stages, but almost all product labels also indicate a maximum growth stage beyond which broadcast applications should not be made says University of Illinois Weed Scientist Aaron Hager. Hager :15 …twelve inch corn cutoff height.For product labels that indicate a specific corn height and growth state, Hager says farmers should be sure to follow the more restrictive of the two. Hager :18 …go with the development stage instead of the corn height.The …

Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials

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Western Corn Rootworm Research Trials
Nick Seiter, Extension Entomologist - University of Illinois When farmers want to know how well an insecticide works they turn to their Land Grant University for unbiased information. Todd Gleason has more from the western corn rootworm trials on the Urbana-Champaign campus. This little four row planter is outfitted…
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2:00 tv cgThis little four-row planter is outfitted with some pretty high tech stuff. All of which must be calibrated before it goes to the field where it will be used to plant a western corn rootworm trial. A trial that will assess how well twelve different current in-furrow liquid and granular insecticides work. Well, at least some of them are current products, others are experimentals says University of Illinois Extension Entomologist Nick Seiter. Seiter :25 …how effective they are.Quote Summary - We like to evaluate all the different options that are out there. There is alw…

How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans

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How to Play Trump’s China Deal for Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of IllinoisThe President has been tweeting about agriculture. He says the potential deal with China will result in “massive” export increases for farm commodities. Most have taken this to mean, at a minimum, that the flow of soybeans will be increased. University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs has been pondering the implications and the deal. Hubbs 4:04 …but a large increase is going to put a lot of pressure on prices. Todd Hubbs specializes is row crop commodity marketing at the University of Illinois. You may read his thoughts on marketing soybeans in today’s (this week’s) post to the farmdocDaily website.

Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans

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Market Outlook for Corn and Soybeans
Todd Hubbs, Agricultural Economist - University of Illinois Farmers, as we enter the last half of May, are nearing the end of the spring planting season and they are turning their attention again to the marketplace. Todd Gleason has more on how one agricultural economist sees prices playing out for the year. We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes…
2:47 radio 3:04 radio self-contained We’ll start with the last numbers USDA publishes in the Supply and Demand tables for each commodity, the season’s average price. For corn, that number - at the midpoint - is $3.80. University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Todd Hubbs is a bit more optimistic. He has it at $4.05. His soybean price, however, is less than USDA’s. The agency has it at $10.00 a bushel. Hubbs puts it at $9.45. The difference in viewpoint says Hubbs lands squarely on soybean exports.Hubbs :36 …whats going on currently in the market.Quote Summary - When we look forwa…